Ella Medler

Biography

Ella Medler is a novelist who lives in Cornwall, UK, with her husband and two teenage daughters. Born in Transylvania, Ella started her writing career as a child writing comedy sketches which she then performed stand-up with her friends mostly during school winter holidays. After graduation, she travelled the world working in financial development and absorbing languages and cultures along the way. After a few years pursuing a traditional career, Ella drifted back to writing and the arts. Nowadays, she could be more often found in her local theatre, where she gladly helps with anything, from costume making to script writing, on a voluntary basis.

Where to find Ella Medler online


Where to buy in print


Books

Not Juliet
By
Series: Addicted To Love Romance Collection, Book 1. Price: $1.99 USD. Words: 39,350. Language: English. Published: February 11, 2014. Category: Fiction » Romance » Suspense
(5.00 from 1 review)
Riella Smith, an unconventional Romany Princess, travels to Tuscany on the trail of her father’s challenger, to delay him and prevent bloodshed. What she expects is trouble from a fearsome rival. But life is rarely that easy. The trouble she finds is of a different kind. In the end she has to choose between her people and a myth: love at first sight. A grown-up romance for those unafraid to blush.
Blood is Power
By
Series: Hunter, Book 2. Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 88,120. Language: English. Published: July 16, 2013. Category: Fiction » Thriller & suspense » Action & suspense
(5.00 from 1 review)
Book 2 - Hunter Series In this second instalment of his story, Nick Hunter proceeds to track down and eliminate every person involved in his son’s kidnap. But where will the chase end? And has he bitten off more than he can chew? Nick discovers a tangled net of human trafficking and corruption, and world-class players with a penchant for disturbed obsessions. Gritty, dark, chock-full of suspense.
Blood Is Heavier
By
Series: Hunter, Book 1. Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 73,140. Language: English. Published: May 5, 2012. Category: Fiction » Thriller & suspense » Action & suspense
(4.86 from 7 reviews)
Nick Hunter used to be a contract killer. Shadows from his past step forward to shatter his short-lived peace and destroy his family. His wife is dead, his four-year old son kidnapped and it looks like someone is trying to frame him for murder. Under pressure, broken, is there anything Nick wouldn't do to rescue his son?

Ella Medler’s tag cloud


Smashwords book reviews by Ella Medler

  • Paradox - The Angels Are Here (Book 1) on March 23, 2012

    ‘A world where there are more questions than answers’ – Patti Roberts writes. A warning to her readers. Or it may be a challenge, a test. Book one of the Paradox Series, ‘The Angels Are Here’ is an introduction to a world where mortals and supernatural beings coexist, some consciously aware of each other, and most – completely oblivious. Soon after the opening scene of death and destruction in Altair, the Imperial City, we are introduced to a special child, Grace. Though she is very young – only eight years old – we immediately sense a cloud of mystery and deep significance hovering over her. This is no ordinary child, and we get drawn in, compelled to protect her. There is a feel of impending disaster which Patti Roberts seamlessly weaves through even the most innocent strands of her story. Our bleak foreboding comes true when Grace loses her father. That scene actually brought tears to my eyes. It shows great empathy and great understanding of the human nature. Brilliant portrayal of the weeks of grief, as well, and of the helplessness of a child who becomes a carer too early in life, a child who makes a conscious decision to grow up. Grace sends her imaginary friend away and starts looking after her mother. Patti Roberts knows how to build a credible character, and she does a great job of that with Grace and the passionate Grigorians – we have no doubts about Abbadon’s huge ego or Theria’s mischievousness. However, besides the deep bond between Grace and her father, I felt I didn’t really know much about the other characters. Perhaps I will learn more about them in Book two. Great portrayal of Angela, Grace’s new friend, who looks suitably incompatible with the human world, and the slip ups Wade makes as he gets more and more settled around Grace and Kate. The conversation between the two girls is believable and funny, just what you would expect at their ages. I feel there is more to the Joshua character, but he is insufficiently developed in this book, and so this is probably another little mystery to solve. Grace’s flashbacks are extremely well written – obviously Patti Roberts is in her element when writing dramatic scenes, no matter where in the world they may take place. I feel a special mention should be made regarding the impressive amount of detail Patti Roberts has accumulated and organised in clear sections for the complete enjoyment of her fan base. This lady loves to indulge her readers, and it shows. The cover art and graphics throughout the book are top quality, absolutely amazing, and the angel wings heart necklace – a masterpiece. All in all, a very enjoyable first book and a truly alluring fantasy world. This author is one to watch.
  • Paradox - The Angels Are Here (Book 1) on March 23, 2012

    ‘A world where there are more questions than answers’ – Patti Roberts writes. A warning to her readers. Or it may be a challenge, a test. Book one of the Paradox Series, ‘The Angels Are Here’ is an introduction to a world where mortals and supernatural beings coexist, some consciously aware of each other, and most – completely oblivious. Soon after the opening scene of death and destruction in Altair, the Imperial City, we are introduced to a special child, Grace. Though she is very young – only eight years old – we immediately sense a cloud of mystery and deep significance hovering over her. This is no ordinary child, and we get drawn in, compelled to protect her. There is a feel of impending disaster which Patti Roberts seamlessly weaves through even the most innocent strands of her story. Our bleak foreboding comes true when Grace loses her father. That scene actually brought tears to my eyes. It shows great empathy and great understanding of the human nature. Brilliant portrayal of the weeks of grief, as well, and of the helplessness of a child who becomes a carer too early in life, a child who makes a conscious decision to grow up. Grace sends her imaginary friend away and starts looking after her mother. Patti Roberts knows how to build a credible character, and she does a great job of that with Grace and the passionate Grigorians – we have no doubts about Abbadon’s huge ego or Theria’s mischievousness. However, besides the deep bond between Grace and her father, I felt I didn’t really know much about the other characters. Perhaps I will learn more about them in Book two. Great portrayal of Angela, Grace’s new friend, who looks suitably incompatible with the human world, and the slip ups Wade makes as he gets more and more settled around Grace and Kate. The conversation between the two girls is believable and funny, just what you would expect at their ages. I feel there is more to the Joshua character, but he is insufficiently developed in this book, and so this is probably another little mystery to solve. Grace’s flashbacks are extremely well written – obviously Patti Roberts is in her element when writing dramatic scenes, no matter where in the world they may take place. I feel a special mention should be made regarding the impressive amount of detail Patti Roberts has accumulated and organised in clear sections for the complete enjoyment of her fan base. This lady loves to indulge her readers, and it shows. The cover art and graphics throughout the book are top quality, absolutely amazing, and the angel wings heart necklace – a masterpiece. All in all, a very enjoyable first book and a truly alluring fantasy world. This author is one to watch.
  • Paradox - Progeny Of Innocence on March 30, 2012

    I do not remember when I have been more spellbound by a fantasy book before. I thought ‘The Angels Are Here’ was good, but not quite fully cooked. With Progeny of Innocence Patti Roberts is just showing off. This book delivers on so many levels. There is so much emotion in this story, so many human traits – the good (love, friendship, bravery and boldness) and the shameful (lust, egotism, self-indulgence, viciousness) all thrown together. But you can never misinterpret the true colour of a person. That weaker characterisation I saw in Book 1 here and there has gone completely. Patti Roberts has grown up. Her writing skills rival some of the very big names out there and I would be surprised if awareness of her talent doesn’t sky-rocket within a few short months. ‘The Angles Are Here’ was a sweet little introduction to a fantasy world that might or might not be real. With ‘Progeny Of Innocence’ we have no choice but to believe. It’s not a fantasy anymore, it is a certainty. ‘It is a shame,’ Patti says, ‘that real life events very rarely portray the grandiose victories personified in fiction’. Because we know, we feel that undercurrent to all of our lives. We’ve always suspected there is more to this inconsequential human existence and Patti Roberts makes it easy to imagine what this might be. The WAFEs slowly awake and remember, and the guardians pull together. Sparks are flying and you find yourself gnawing on your nails with increased anxiety. The good and the evil dance around each other in ever-decreasing circles until you shiver with the imminence of the epic battle you can see will be unleashed in the very near future. There is a YA tinge to most of the second half of the novel, but it is nicely done and the adult world weaves through it skilfully. There are stories within the story, and again they do not detract, but expertly add to the texture and depth of the main plot. We see heavy symbolism and original threads too, and a little Shakespearean conflict between the two obvious enemies: Damon, in body, hangs out with the Grigorians but his heart and spirit have long belonged to Juliette. I must make a special mention. Often debut authors are so eager to get on with their story that they don’t spend enough time getting to know their own world, and that shows. Sometimes, they are lucky enough to be able to develop it in an acceptable manner in a sequel, and sometimes it is just so seriously underdeveloped, it is jarring. This is not the case here. Patti Roberts is so comfortable with her creation that it leaves no questions unanswered. You can see the prisoners being dragged in, you can see the forest and its people, you can understand the relationships between the six ancient races and feel their resistance to Grigorian rule. Paradox is not a story in a place – it is the legend of a whole world. As far as I am concerned, I don’t know how Patti’s writing could be improved upon. I’m waiting for the third book in the series and will be counting the weeks to its release. And there is a very strong chance that I might be tempted to sneak back to the Paradox blog page to get my fix and check for news.
  • Paradox - Progeny Of Innocence on March 30, 2012

    I do not remember when I have been more spellbound by a fantasy book before. I thought ‘The Angels Are Here’ was good, but not quite fully cooked. With Progeny of Innocence Patti Roberts is just showing off. This book delivers on so many levels. There is so much emotion in this story, so many human traits – the good (love, friendship, bravery and boldness) and the shameful (lust, egotism, self-indulgence, viciousness) all thrown together. But you can never misinterpret the true colour of a person. That weaker characterisation I saw in Book 1 here and there has gone completely. Patti Roberts has grown up. Her writing skills rival some of the very big names out there and I would be surprised if awareness of her talent doesn’t sky-rocket within a few short months. ‘The Angles Are Here’ was a sweet little introduction to a fantasy world that might or might not be real. With ‘Progeny Of Innocence’ we have no choice but to believe. It’s not a fantasy anymore, it is a certainty. ‘It is a shame,’ Patti says, ‘that real life events very rarely portray the grandiose victories personified in fiction’. Because we know, we feel that undercurrent to all of our lives. We’ve always suspected there is more to this inconsequential human existence and Patti Roberts makes it easy to imagine what this might be. The WAFEs slowly awake and remember, and the guardians pull together. Sparks are flying and you find yourself gnawing on your nails with increased anxiety. The good and the evil dance around each other in ever-decreasing circles until you shiver with the imminence of the epic battle you can see will be unleashed in the very near future. There is a YA tinge to most of the second half of the novel, but it is nicely done and the adult world weaves through it skilfully. There are stories within the story, and again they do not detract, but expertly add to the texture and depth of the main plot. We see heavy symbolism and original threads too, and a little Shakespearean conflict between the two obvious enemies: Damon, in body, hangs out with the Grigorians but his heart and spirit have long belonged to Juliette. I must make a special mention. Often debut authors are so eager to get on with their story that they don’t spend enough time getting to know their own world, and that shows. Sometimes, they are lucky enough to be able to develop it in an acceptable manner in a sequel, and sometimes it is just so seriously underdeveloped, it is jarring. This is not the case here. Patti Roberts is so comfortable with her creation that it leaves no questions unanswered. You can see the prisoners being dragged in, you can see the forest and its people, you can understand the relationships between the six ancient races and feel their resistance to Grigorian rule. Paradox is not a story in a place – it is the legend of a whole world. As far as I am concerned, I don’t know how Patti’s writing could be improved upon. I’m waiting for the third book in the series and will be counting the weeks to its release. And there is a very strong chance that I might be tempted to sneak back to the Paradox blog page to get my fix and check for news.
  • Tomorrows Child on April 11, 2012

    Tomorrow’s Child deals with an apocalypse idea by going deep and scrutinising people’s habits, actions and emotions in a way most authors would shy away from. We meet Psyche Darnell and we know she is special. It takes a while for her to discover why and what she is expected to do with her gifts, her teenage hormones don’t make for an easy ride, but at least she is surrounded by friends. All she has to do is merely accept the truth, because Starr West is right – ‘you don’t have to believe in something for it to be true’. It’s never easy admitting you are flawed, but here none of the characters are perfect. Despite this, or maybe because of it, you can’t help but feel close to them. There aren’t many without special attributes, so you can’t really mistake them for normal people, but they exude warmth and friendship, a strong sense of right and wrong and they would gladly sacrifice themselves for the greater good - the very essence of humanity. The story is well written, in a strong and clear voice. There are points of darkness and suspense throughout the plot but it is not a dizzyingly fast carousel of action, and neither should it be. Scenarios such as this require careful consideration. You can’t just skip merrily to the next page without thinking about the problems posed to the last few surviving humans. You can’t not think of all the ramifications, all the what-ifs, all of the what-would-I-dos. Starr is clearly a people watcher, a very keen observer, and it shows. The way different people deal with their own personal crises is portrayed brilliantly. The outcome is a ray of light, quite satisfying, and the epilogue gives a glimpse of future frictions and even confrontations. We’ll have to wait for book two to see how they unfold. A good first entry, by a deep-thinking author and a very pleasant read. Just don’t expect to stop thinking about it when you’ve put it down.
  • A Dream in the Night - 2nd Edition on April 30, 2012

    “Life is the hardest game Anyone can play It keeps changing the rules With the dawn of each new day” I can honestly say “A Dream In The Night” was nothing like what I expected. This book is an eerie combination of verse, thoughts and short stories – moments in the author’s life – challenging, unanswered questions and emotion. So much emotion. Yes, it is dark, and yes, it is raw. But in this autobiographical tale Michael takes us on a journey full of scenes most of us will have only glimpsed from afar. “Everyone has their own wars to fight, [...] Everyone has their own scars to hide.” How true and insightful, yet how easy to disregard in our rush to live. How many of us ever stop to wonder exactly how we live our lives, what makes it what it is and whether there is any way to influence it and make it belong to us? In going about our daily business, how often do we wonder whose lives we also touch? Or if that person we shoved out of our way may be struggling under a burden no man should be allowed to carry on his own? There are words about friendship and society, love and memories, night and dreams. There is rebellion against the numbing effects of living in a world such as ours and what it turns us into. You’re left repeating Michael’s words again and again “Sometimes life gives us no choice.” A Dream In The Night is not a collection of happy stories, but it gives hope to those who need it most. It is unconventional, and I like that very much – it is one attribute the traditionally published books do not seem to have anymore, that spark that makes a work different. I also like the fact that Michael has poured his heart and soul into it – not just a few weeks’ worth of it, but years and years. He changed and he allowed us to see that. He was hurt and he let us see his pain. Now on his feet, scarred warrior, he’s here to share his tale. If you pick up this book, approach it with an open mind and don’t rush. Read it through, and then read it again. Once you’ve done that, you can begin to think. If your thoughts make you feel a touch uncomfortable, stop there. Get a drink, take a walk, and then see what you can do about making someone’s life a little better.
  • A Dream in the Night - 2nd Edition on April 30, 2012

    “Life is the hardest game Anyone can play It keeps changing the rules With the dawn of each new day” I can honestly say “A Dream In The Night” was nothing like what I expected. This book is an eerie combination of verse, thoughts and short stories – moments in the author’s life – challenging, unanswered questions and emotion. So much emotion. Yes, it is dark, and yes, it is raw. But in this autobiographical tale Michael takes us on a journey full of scenes most of us will have only glimpsed from afar. “Everyone has their own wars to fight, [...] Everyone has their own scars to hide.” How true and insightful, yet how easy to disregard in our rush to live. How many of us ever stop to wonder exactly how we live our lives, what makes it what it is and whether there is any way to influence it and make it belong to us? In going about our daily business, how often do we wonder whose lives we also touch? Or if that person we shoved out of our way may be struggling under a burden no man should be allowed to carry on his own? There are words about friendship and society, love and memories, night and dreams. There is rebellion against the numbing effects of living in a world such as ours and what it turns us into. You’re left repeating Michael’s words again and again “Sometimes life gives us no choice.” A Dream In The Night is not a collection of happy stories, but it gives hope to those who need it most. It is unconventional, and I like that very much – it is one attribute the traditionally published books do not seem to have anymore, that spark that makes a work different. I also like the fact that Michael has poured his heart and soul into it – not just a few weeks’ worth of it, but years and years. He changed and he allowed us to see that. He was hurt and he let us see his pain. Now on his feet, scarred warrior, he’s here to share his tale. If you pick up this book, approach it with an open mind and don’t rush. Read it through, and then read it again. Once you’ve done that, you can begin to think. If your thoughts make you feel a touch uncomfortable, stop there. Get a drink, take a walk, and then see what you can do about making someone’s life a little better.
  • Paradox - Bound By Blood on Oct. 22, 2012

    Bound By Blood is the third instalment in the Paradox series, and what a sweet treat it is! If book one – The Angels Are Here – was a promising beginning and book two – Progeny Of Innocence – a tantalizing dip into this gloomy and mysterious realm ruled by the Grigori, the Fallen Dark Angels, Bound By Blood connects the dots and gives depth and understanding to how this whole world came to be. “The world, and heaven, are a little off-balance at the moment,” Patti Roberts says through the mouth of little Tia Lilly, the Angel of Death. How true. Events, characters and emotions have the ring of authenticity. Patti is very generous in her descriptions and she has the gift of being an incredible storyteller. The ultimate Scheherazade, Patti layers story over story, and nestles myth and legend into each other, so that at every step you’re tempted to wonder – Ah! Is that what happened? Take the legend of St. Valentine, for example. But I don’t want to give you spoilers. I will say only that the characters are beautiful, very well developed. There is no question in my mind when I read the dialogue as to whose words they are. The storyline takes us back in time and explains in intricate detail the cause and effect, taking the reader full circle, and at the same time Patti continues to develop current events and takes the story forward. The style is smooth and trance-like in places, sharp and dramatic in the battle scenes, enigmatic and sly when Weasel goes about his business, and back to normal contemporary conversation in the human world. Don’t try to guess the outcome – you’ll get it wrong. I’ve never met an author so able to send me on a wild-goose chase, only to make it perfectly clear I should be looking elsewhere for my answers. I wholeheartedly recommend reading the first two books in the series, if you haven’t already done it. Read them all back to back, but take your time. This is one of those stories you could lose yourself into, a tale to savour and dream about, not something you could cram in a hurry. There is a lot of hidden wisdom in Patti’s words, and it would be a pity to miss it. You never know, you might find in there the odd question you haven’t yet thought to ask, or even the odd answer. I love this world, I love the characters, I love the entire concept. There is a lot to love in Paradox, and the picture is vivid and real. I would like to point you in the direction of the Paradox site, where you can see the map of Altair, the sigils of the six tribes, family trees, characters, answers to frequently asked questions, and much more: http://theangelsarehere.wordpress.com/readers-questions-answered/ This alone is huge proof of the author’s dedication to her work and also her readers. This book, and indeed the whole series, is fully deserving of the five stars I’m giving it, and well worth spending some time immersed in its magic. Well done, Patti Roberts.
  • Paradox - Equilibrium (book 4) on Dec. 13, 2013

    The Paradox saga continues with an impressive twist in the tale. Dark forces are at play and there’s no respite for the guardians and protectors. Grace takes a few more steps towards learning about her legacy, but her impetuousness lands her in the path of danger yet again. I have been watching out for new releases in this series and I can honestly say this is the best episode so far. Absolutely love the world in which the action takes place, the richness and diversity of characters, the beautiful descriptions and the depth of emotion. Not for the first time, I found myself moved to tears reading scenes written by this amazing author. I can see how easy it would be to transfer these books into a YA serial for television, and I’m not ashamed to say I would watch it, too, though I’m far out of the age range. Marvel’s Superheroes comes to mind, only on a much wider background, and with a breadth of characters far easier to stage-manage and adjust. The possibilities are endless – so much potential for entertainment! And with a classic battle between good and evil – some overt, some discreet or merely hinted at – this is a winning format that simply can’t go wrong. Keep it going, Patti Roberts!
  • Surviving Mancation on Jan. 08, 2014

    Nine friends in one remote holiday house for a long weekend of R&R. What could possibly go wrong? I mean, they’ve got enough food. Surviving Mancation is an original mix of mystery, crime and thriller, at times introspective and often hilarious, with enough twists to make you pleasantly dizzy. A classic ‘whodunnit’ with a contemporary and entirely plausible ring to it. I loved the concept of this book, and the beautiful descriptions. I could picture only too well the house, the forest, the lake, even the watcher in the woods. The nine guys spending the weekend together are a motley bunch, each with his own backstory and motivation, intrigue and deep-rooted emotions running pretty close to the surface. Right from the beginning, you wonder: quite how good and how close are these friends? I enjoyed the banter between friends, the silly antics of Mac and Cody, and even the last-minute betrayal. Really loved them all. There is a scene in a confessional right at the end, so good, it’ll leave you thinking. And then BAM – the ending. Fully deserving of five stars, Surviving Mancation is one of the few books I’ll likely read again. I recommend it. Scenes of violence and some adult language make it unsuitable for young readers.
  • Stalking Red on Feb. 26, 2014

    This book is a thrilling story of suspense, betrayal and ultimate trust in family ties, skilfully set against the beautiful background of Alaskan culture. Red is a woman perfectly able to deal with whatever life throws her way, though loneliness seeps almost unnoticed in every layer of her existence. Things only take a turn for the better when she begins to notice hunk and neighbor, PR, who’d held a flame for her for ages. I won’t reveal any more of the plot, but let’s just say their relationship is great fun to read about, the dialogues are sharp and witty, and the intrigue the two protagonists get drawn into quickly transforms into a thriller, a fight for life which will keep you on the edge of your seat for hours. The ending was superb, so well-done, and so satisfying. I wouldn’t have expected any less from such a strong community, but it felt good to see everyone got what they deserved nonetheless. If you love the Alaskan wilderness, believe in family bonds and would like to read a different sort of suspenseful novel, completely original, then this is the book for you. I loved it.
  • User Pays on May 29, 2014

    A thinking person’s political parable – short and chilling – showing all-too-clearly the hazards of following political dogma without giving it even the most cursory discerning, intelligent thought. Very well-written, though too short for me. I would have liked to have seen this story more developed. Perhaps the author may have plans to build on this idea – it certainly has merit, in my view. In this day and age, following doctrines sheep-like is an extravagance humanity simply can’t afford anymore. Recommended.