Eldot

Biography

Eldot, a simple cipher, is a nom de plume. Eldot is retired, and has lived in the Pacific Northwest for most of his life. Mother Nature has been kind to him in most respects, but he has lots of grey hair and a modest pot belly. The illusion in his mind that he is still in his thirties persists—if only his carcass would cooperate. But his physician happily reports that physically he is fifteen years younger than the calendar reports, so there’s still time for play.

In order to dodge the draft and avoid the Viet Nam war, he took an occupational deferment to teach Drama and English in a public high school. The interminable nature of the war and the draft lottery kept him in that occupation so long that he stayed there afterward, having been quite successful. Why change a good thing? The refuge had morphed into a career.

Additional information is available at http://www.diphra.com or http://www.littlejandroger.com

Where to find Eldot online


Books

Inside Eldot's World: a Literary Gazetteer
By
Price: Free! Words: 39,300. Language: English. Published: July 4, 2012. Category: Nonfiction » Gay and Lesbian » Essays
Pioneering, and controversial: the 5 novel series Little J and Roger, and its successor Julian's Private Scrapbook are unlike anything attempted before in fiction. The Gazetteer is part history, part analysis, part supplementary to the books. The author shows the inside story of this daring series. The whys and hows are fully explained--no questions are left unanswered.
The Champions: Julian's Private Scrapbook Part 5
By
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 127,340. Language: English. Published: May 5, 2012. Category: Fiction » Literature » Coming of age
Eldot’s final novel in the five part Scrapbook series about Julian’s coming of age at summer camp. The last three days: class activities are finished, competitions held, awards presented, goodbyes said. Unfinished personal business is completed; a few new developments pop up, making this the longest book in the series. This character study is rich with comedy, suspense and sentimental elements.
Thunder and Lightning: Julian's Private Scrapbook Part 4
By
Price: $5.99 USD. Words: 112,420. Language: English. Published: March 5, 2012. Category: Fiction » Gay & lesbian fiction » Gay
It’s the second week at scout camp; many stories are in play, making this the most action packed book in the series; it continues where Shooting Gallery left off in time, action, and character growth. The theme of love remains dominant. Geoff continues his quest to seduce scoutmaster Mark. One new story: Alex mentors Clint during an overnight hike. Julian’s skill as an artist continues to develop.
The Shooting Gallery: Julian's Private Scrapbook, Part 3
By
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 104,620. Language: English. Published: February 15, 2012. Category: Fiction » Gay & lesbian fiction » Gay
Days six, seven and eight at Camp Walker. The comical side of camp life is featured, along with some new story developments. Julian Draws two portraits: Leonard, and then Mark. Julian and Mark’s conferences continue. Julian feels empowered and undertakes a unique challenge: outfitting Nick and Tom’s clandestine bedroom. He becomes their self-appointed secret guardian.
The Poker Club: Julian's Private Scrapbook Part 2
By
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 105,020. Language: English. Published: December 16, 2011. Category: Fiction » Literature » Coming of age
Tom has to come to grips with the discovery that he has fallen in love. He is used to being free of commitments. Others seek his favor and make his task difficult. Other romances are underway that he doesn’t know about; still others are about to begin. The camp is a beehive of activity as the third day begins. Unknown to Tom and Nick, Julian and Mark are silent supporters.
Barr's Meadow: Julian's Private Scrapbook Part 1
By
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 104,020. Language: English. Published: November 21, 2011. Category: Fiction » Literature » Coming of age
Julian has had this crush for four years; it's time to make his move. He's been a scout for a year now; he just knows the perfect situation is at hand: summer camp. The distractions of the working world will be removed. Mark will be his before the bus trip home. He's been in love with his scoutmaster forever - since he was nine, at least. Mark proves to be more of a challenge than he expected.
The Champions: Little J and Roger Part 5
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 117,880. Language: English. Published: September 1, 2011. Category: Fiction » Literature » Coming of age
Eldot’s final novel in the five part Little J and Roger series. The last three days of camp: class activities have to be finished, competitions held, awards presented, and goodbyes said. There is much unfinished personal business to complete; a few new developments pop up along the way, making this the longest book in the five part series.
Thunder and Lightning: Little J and Roger Part 4
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 105,370. Language: English. Published: August 1, 2011. Category: Fiction » Literature » Coming of age
Eldot continues his coming of age novel with more fast paced activity. The second fun filled week at camp continues with surprises, challenges, successes and a few disappointments. There are romances, and there are lots of extra-curricular activities. Tony in particular has a good time. Thunder and Lightning employs 87 characters, the highest number yet in the Little J and Roger series.
The Shooting Gallery: Little J and Roger Part 3
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 103,880. Language: English. Published: July 1, 2011. Category: Fiction » Literature » Coming of age
Days six, seven and eight at Camp Walker. The comical side of camp life is featured, along with some new story developments. Julian learns about Erik, and Mark’s story unfolds. Julian and Mark’s relationship develops an aesthetic dimension. Julian feels empowered and undertakes a unique challenge: outfitting Nick and Tom’s clandestine bedroom. He becomes their self-appointed secret guardian.
The Poker Club: Little J and Roger Part 2
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 97,570. Language: English. Published: May 1, 2011. Category: Fiction » Literature » Coming of age
Tom has to come to grips with the discovery that he has fallen in love. He is used to being free of commitments. Others seek his favor and make his task difficult. Other romances are underway that he doesn’t know about; still others are about to begin. The camp is a beehive of activity as the third day begins. Unknown to Tom and Nick, Julian and Mark are silent supporters.
Barr's Meadow: Little J and Roger Part 1
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 99,360. Language: English. Published: February 4, 2011. Category: Fiction » Literature » Coming of age
(5.00 from 1 review)
Julian has had this crush for four years; it's time to make his move. He's been a scout for a year now; he just knows the perfect situation is at hand: summer camp. All the distractions of the working world will be removed. Mark will be his before the trip home. He's been in love with his scoutmaster forever-since he was nine, at least. He doesn't know how well he has chosen the place and time.

Eldot’s tag cloud


Smashwords book reviews by Eldot

  • The Boy Who Laughed on Feb. 03, 2011

    The novel is important reading. It tells a wonderful love story and leaves the reader feeling grateful to have been included in what seems like a very vivid memory. It does that in an ethnic portrait that is unfamiliar and exotic to an American who is several generations away from the Scots who came to this country. The central story is supported by a range of supporting characters and sub characters. It is a long book, perhaps a tad rough around the edges--yet that quality lends it an air of authenticity one expects in a memoir, as much as anything. Maybe it would not be so engaging if it were highly polished. The opening scene is problematic in that it suggests that the story is of an entirely different sort. The discussion and depiction of physical punishment is visceral and frightening. I nearly put the book down after a few pages. Fortunately, I skipped forward to see if that was really what the book was about. I'm glad I did that; otherwise I would have missed a wonderful experience. The rest of the book provides the context for that seemingly brutal opening event, and it takes on an entirely new significance. It is an ethnic event, not a sexual aberration or fetish. Good to know about, actually. Unfortunately, my download did not include the attractive color cover. I recommend this book without reservation. I will read it a second time, at least. I miss the characters and wish that I had been able to know them. I'm glad to have their experience and life experience in my memory bank. I feel enriched. That's why it is a good read.
  • Cowboys Can Fly on Feb. 25, 2011

    Thank you, Ken Smith for this wonderful book. I usually avoid encounters with pathos. Lucky for me, I didn't dodge this one. The vernacular was new to me, but the context usually provided the needed bridge. Novels in the first person are difficult to pull off so well. I applaud the craft that lies behind the scenes. The stylistic innovations are subtle and effective. Only occasionally was I aware that an adult of considerable experience and skill was pulling the strings. For the most part, the "willing suspension of disbelief" sufficed. This is not a criticism; at times, my eye may be too well trained for its own good. The intensely positive viewpoint throughout is particularly pleasing and rewarding. The final blessing given by Cy reflects back on the author. I shall make it a goal to read all of his work that I can. Five stars for this one. I presume it was written for adults. It ought to be on every high school recommended reading list as well. Eldot
  • Social Skills on April 08, 2013

    Thank you, Sara Alva for writing this book. Anyone who reads it will have a good day—maybe a great day. Your characters are interesting, varied, and familiar. Their story is not new—but the way the characters are artfully guided through the challenges—very real challenges—is engaging and at times gripping. I wanted more—I could have spent much more time with the cast of characters. But wisely, I suspect, you did not waver from your purpose; your “argument,” in the Shakespearean sense, is better for that. I ended with a list of questions, but none that had to be answered. They intrigue but do not distract. The kernel of a series is there; you have created a world with real people and real situations; one expects that a number of stories glimpsed in Social Skills could be spun into a book. I appreciated the texture and the musical references. Congratulations and plaudits for producing a credible happily ever after story. Eldot