Fiero Publishing

Publisher info

Fiero Publishing is a new publisher of popular fiction, currently committed to bringing to electronic and print-on-demand publication the backlist and new works of a select number of authors.

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Fiero Publishing's favorite authors on Smashwords


Smashwords book reviews by Fiero Publishing

  • Baby, One More Time on April 13, 2011

    For sheer outrageousness, few writers beat Dave's black humor and quirky charm.
  • How I Sold 1 Million eBooks in 5 Months on June 22, 2011

    Terry Hayman from Fiero Publishing here. I have to say that I'm not a huge fan of John's novels (meaning I'm not his target audience), but after reading this book, I think I'm a fan of him as a person and author. Lots of this stuff really resonated with me and sparked all sorts of ideas. Even had me finally understanding how I could use Twitter in a meaningful way! Thanks for sharing, John.
  • The Taste of Shrimp on June 28, 2011

    A story of a marriage in crisis. Laura Ware does some nice stuff here - getting you to think about the unspoken deals you make going into a marriage, the fears you have, and the ways love can help you past them.
  • Afterburn on July 02, 2011

    Gripping fun. Abrahamson has created an exciting new entry into the fantasy genre with characters who can call on the power of the earth to redraw reality with vellum and ink. And she's got a great kick-ass heroine leading the charge. I was totally into the magic, the characters, the politics of Homeland Security trying to draw the Gifted into their fold. It's an engrossing read with a mind-blowing climax that will have you rethinking just how safe you are if you live in any of nature's danger zones. Looking forward to the next book with Vallon Drake!
  • The Bikini Wedding on July 03, 2011

    A story filled with a heartwarming optimism and quirky sense of humor.
  • Skin and Bone on July 14, 2011

    Some fantasy/sf worlds ease you into them with subtle (or not) explanations of why things are the way they are. Others just plunge you in and challenge you to catch up as the story races forward. This book is definitely of the latter variety. I found myself going WTF a bunch in the beginning, even as I was intrigued by the characters and creepy situations which aren't for the faint of heart. (Eviscerated bodies anyone?) But as everything starts to make more sense and the history of what happened in this alternate reality becomes clear, the tension just keeps on building to a nice pay off - a truly epic battle between a born storyteller and a monster in desperate need to fill himself with stories by crunching/sucking/ripping them out of the bones of his unfortunate victims. Lots of poetry about storytelling and meaning and family and life and death wrapped into a visceral, punch-in-the-gut narrative. Cool beans.
  • The Society of Secret Cats on July 19, 2011

    Lewis Carroll does Inception. Lots of fun dreams-within-dreams stuff that's full of more than enchantment than frightening suspense. And a must for cat lovers.
  • Bubba Goes for Broke on July 19, 2011

    Ah, Bubba. And Tiffany. Humor hits everyone differently, but Bawdy's got some good stuff here - involving characters, a real flare for description and situations, and a sense of humor that ranges from painfully honest to head-slappingly, outrageously moronic. When my day was really busy or stressful, this was a great place to come and relax with a few chuckles. There's got to be more Bubba.
  • Miracle, Texas on Oct. 03, 2011

    This starts like it's going to be a comedy, but actually has a lot of feminist meat in it. A nice rousing tale with a cool author's note at the end discussing the origins of the story.
  • The Cartographer's Daughter on Oct. 17, 2011

    Echo what the other reviewers have said - a fun book with a broad historical scope, shot through with a neat kind of magic. This is the second Cartos book of Abrahamson's I've read. Other one was Afterburn - same magic system but contemporary adult. It's a magic universe she obviously plans to explore fully and that should make us all very happy.
  • Where There’s a Will There’s a Murder on Feb. 25, 2012

    Weinberg’s Residue Class novels hearken back to the Sherlock Holmes stories where the joy of the writing isn’t brute action (although there are a couple scenes of that in Where There’s a Will…), but rather clever deduction. Even more, Weinberg relishes how all things of this world work, from foreign languages and customs to the computer black boxes of sports cars and, particularly in this novel, the almost farcically-complex rules of estate law. It’s like traveling the world while having an intense chat with a bunch of really interesting, intelligent people. And when those people also have delightful quirks and character growth, like Weinberg’s narrator here – a charmingly-naïve female fifteen-year-old math-genius kleptomaniac named Libby – you know you’re in for a delightful series. Well done.