Harry Heyoka

Biography

"The job of the writer is to kiss no ass, no matter how big and holy and white and tempting and powerful." -- Ken Kesey

The biggest, holiest ass in SF is the galactic empire, sometimes called (for good reasons) its most ridiculous idea ever. Contrary Harry wondered what innovations might make a real galactic empire possible, and so created his Spiral's Realms future history; but is "possible" desirable?

"Dismissing SF as serious literature is a dangerous mistake," Harry writes. "It's the only genre consistently prodding folks to look farther down the road to the future. We need that, if we're to have a future."

A refugee from rampant deforestation, Harry Heyoka has spent his adult life in Hawaii, Europe, and North America. Though mute, he is literate in several languages and holds a BS in BS. He loves raw foods and craft ales, and lives with "his" cat outside Helen Gone, Oregon.

Harry also loves good music of all kinds. Check out his Pandora stations at
http://www.pandora.com/people/oregonlibertarian

If you like a story, please submit a brief review, and remember to assign as many stars as you see fit.

Smashwords Interview

Where did you grow up, and how did this influence your writing?
I was orphaned somewhere in Sumatra, and eventually adopted by an American couple who raised me in their secluded home in Hawaii. Impressed with how easily I learned American Sign Language, my new Ma and Pa tought me to read and write English next. To this day, most of my writing is in English.
When did you first start writing?
My handwriting has always been terrible, so I took over Ma's old manual typewriter soon after I learned the alphabet. She got tired of hearing me hunt and peck, so she masked the keys and wouldn't let me type until I memorized the keyboard. Soon I was touch typing at 20 words per minute, and started my first novel at age 6.
By the time I was 7, I realized that first story was juvenile trash, and I threw it away. I've thrown away others since, but never one as bad as the first.
Read more of this interview.

Where to find Harry Heyoka online


Books

Life Choice
By
You set the price! Words: 2,540. Language: English. Published: March 21, 2011. Category: Fiction » Science fiction » High tech
Truly revolutionary technology changes everything, including culture and language. Early in the 23rd century, an expectant couple move from Ceres to a new asteroid belt habitat, hoping to make a better life for themselves and their unborn child. This is a short story for general audiences, set early in the Solar Era of Heyoka's all-too-plausible Spiral's Realms future history.
Hyperspatial Jump Drive for Dummies
By
Price: Free! Words: 1,290. Language: English. Published: August 23, 2009. Category: Nonfiction » Science and Nature » Physics
(1.00)
This newly revised essay clarifies the theoretical basis of hyperspatial jump drive for those with limited understanding of math, physics, and galactic history. Details on the actual operation, capabilities, and limitations of hyperspatial starships (or “jump ships”) in the Galactic Era are not included; nor are galactic navigation charts, wormhole coordinates, or batteries.
Build Your Own Galactic Empire
By
Price: Free! Words: 960. Language: English. Published: August 3, 2009. Category: Nonfiction » Science and Nature » Cosmos
(5.00)
Lighthearted DO and DON'T lists for achieving pan-galactic supremacy or writing hard science fiction, formulated by the author of the Spiral Vector series in the course of developing his Spiral's Realms future history. WARNING: DO NOT TRY THIS AT HOME!
On the Great Wall of Texas
By
You set the price! Words: 1,130. Language: English. Published: May 24, 2009. Category: Fiction » Science fiction » Short stories
(4.25)
In 2045 a sergeant shows a young draftee the ropes of guarding the Mexican border, explaining how the Wall came to be built and why they are there. This is a short-short story, for general audiences, set very early in Harry Heyoka's all-too-plausible Spiral's Realms future history.

Harry Heyoka's favorite authors on Smashwords


Smashwords book reviews by Harry Heyoka

  • Strip Tease Fantasy - Romance Short Story on March 17, 2010

    With credible characters and good pacing and plot development, this short story kept me interested despite a few typos and punctuation errors. 3 thumbs up!
  • 101 Degrees Fahrenheit on March 17, 2010

    Hot and sticky, and an enjoyable read.
  • Hole on March 30, 2010

    I hate to contradict the eminent Dr Winkie, who has posted nothing here but his bad review, but I disagree completely. As a lifelong grammar geek, I spotted only a couple of incomplete sentences -- no great sin, since their meanings were clear and they fit the story's mood. This is no rambling essay, but a stream-of-consciousness short-short. That form precludes extensive explanations, and the answers to Winkie's questions are less important than the story's emotional impact. I liked it on first reading. After reading Winkie's review, I read the story again and liked it even more. I hope to see more from David Lovato. Three thumbs up!
  • Making Up on March 30, 2010

    The surface of Venus is hot enough to melt lead, so setting this story there was a careless mistake. And I'm disappointed to see a writer like Trace misuse the contraction "it's" (meaning "it is") in place of the possessive pronoun "its." I like Making Up, regardless. The narrative flows smoothly, and the (hot!) love scenes are more emotional than mechanical. This story would better be sub-categorized as "fantasy erotica" than "sci-fi erotica" -- but perhaps my own preference for hard science fiction is showing. I give Making Up two thumbs and one other appendage up.
  • The Adventures of Ray the Robot on April 14, 2010

    A fun read, though it could use some expert copy editing. Three thumbs up!
  • Waiting For Orders on Aug. 28, 2011

    Weirdly twisted, "Waiting for Orders" had me fooled for a while. Well worth a read, and I'll look for more from Alain Miles. Four thumbs up!
  • West of 89 on June 05, 2012

    The best "first novel" I've read in ages, "West of '89" made me laugh so much that the cat abandoned my lap. Then Greigh brought tears to my eyes, and a minute later made me laugh again. Only a first-rate storyteller can do that to me. Greigh's alternate history starts diverging from ours in 1810, when West Florida secedes from Spain and is annexed by the USA. That leads to New England's secession in 1814, a major fork in the historical road. The story is set in 1989, in a North America with no Canada. The States are bounded in the southwest by the Republic of Texas, a bit of Mexico, and the Confederated Republics of California (CRC). To the north lie the Inuktik Circumpolar Enterprise (ICE), the Republic of Quebec, and the Commonwealths of Atlantis (New England and what we call the Canadian maritime provinces). A 1922 revolution turned Dixie (east of the Mississippi River and south of the northern borders of Tennessee and North Carolina to the tip of Florida's peninsula) into the Citizens' Collective of Communal Provinces (CCCP); but the States include the Caribbean islands and Central America as far south as Costa Rica, bounded by Gran Columbia (which still owns Panama). Richly and plausibly detailed, Greigh's greater "California" is populated with highly believable characters, including some real people you'll recognize (despite altered names) from our own time line -- ID-ing them was a lot of fun for me. Greigh has fun with the language, too, incorporating regional dialects both real and extrapolated. His pacing makes it hard to put the book down after the first couple of chapters, but a few times (after particularly disturbing scenes) I found I had to take a short breather. The tension builds steadily, knitting subplots together, to a credible and satisfying conclusion. Why not 5 stars, then? I'm so tough a grader, the only SF novel worthy of 5 stars that springs to my mind is "Stranger in a Strange Land." But even as a lifelong fan, I'd give Heinlein's first book "For Us, The Living" only 3 stars. "West of '89" leaves me eager to see what Gene Greigh will write next. Buy it!
  • Making Mina: The Best Revenge on Jan. 27, 2013

    This story is everything an erotic short should be -- well written, plausible, and very hot! Graves is a real talent, and left me eager to see more of her work. Four thumbs and another appendage up!
  • Rock & Roll (Vol. I of the Savannah Rossi Chronicles) on Jan. 27, 2013

    Good writing, a strong and believable heroine, and a very hot story -- what more could you ask? This one gets four thumbs and another appendage up.
  • Sharing Melissa‚Äôs Mouth on Feb. 09, 2013

    Well written, despite a few typos, and very hot.
  • Taking Amber on Feb. 09, 2013

    Good writing, plausible story line, hot hot hot! Four thumbs and one other appendage up.
  • Double Penetration in the Desert: An Interracial Cuckold Story on Feb. 09, 2013

    Short erotica doesn't get much better than this. Well written, plausible, and extremely hot! Four thumbs and one other appendage up.
  • His Lucky Break on March 02, 2013

    Short on plot and characterization, but well phrased and hot. Three thumbs and one other appendage up.
  • My Criminal Lover: Part 1 on June 30, 2013
    (no rating)
    Bad spelling, bad grammar, bad rape fantasy. No characterization, almost no plot. I can't believe any self-respecting woman could write this crap; "Denise" is probably a misogynist Dennis.
  • Taylor A Tale of Seduction Part 1 on July 09, 2013

    I can't wait for the next part. Three thumbs and one other appendage up.
  • Six One Four? on July 20, 2013

    Slightly twisted, and pretty hot!