Ian Miller

Biography

Ian J Miller was born 7th August 1942 to the son of a policeman sent to Hokitika (New Zealand) to fill vacancies due to the mass murderer Stanley Graham. Secondary education was at Ashburton High School, thence to University of Canterbury (BSc Hons1, PhD), followed by post-docs at Calgary, Southampton and Armidale. I returned to New Zealand to Chemistry Division, DSIR, to work first on lignin chemistry, then recycling, seaweed research, then hydrothermal wood liquefaction. In 1986 I left DSIR to set up Carina Chemical Laboratories Ltd, to carry out research to support the private half of a joint venture to make pyromellitates, the basis of high temperature resistant plastics. (When called to a TV program to discuss the danger of foam plastics in fires, I aimed a gas torch at the palm of my hand, protected only by a piece of foam plastic I had made shortly before. Fortunately, it worked, it glowed yellow hot, but held the heat for about half a minute.) This venture, and an associated seaweed processing venture collapsed during the late 1980s financial crisis, mostly for financial reasons. Current projects include the development of Nemidon gels (www.nemidon.co.nz/) and fuels and chemicals through the hydrothermal treatment of microalgae (www.aquaflowgroup.com/). I have written about 100 peer-reviewed scientific papers, about 35 other articles, and I was on the Editorial Board of Botanica Marina between about 1998-2008.

In my first year University, following an argument with some Arts students, I was challenged to write a fictional book. I did in spare time: Gemina. I subsequently self-published a revised version, only to find publicity was forbidden as a condition of getting my finance for the pyromellitates project. Since then, I have written a few more science in fiction thriller-type novels that don't fit nicely in any category. These form a "future history", and Puppeteer is the first of one entry point.

Smashwords Interview

Where did you grow up, and how did this influence your writing?
I grew up in Hokitika, then Rakaia, both small towns in New Zealand. Both favoured outdoor activities, and neither had much in the way of cultural activity. This made me much more independently oriented, and it forced me to think for myself. On top of that, Hokitika is on the West Coast, an isolated region where there is a tradition of being "your own man". Perhaps, as a consequence, my writing is somewhat different from that of many other authors, as I try more for originality than compliance with accepted procedures.
When did you first start writing?
My first efforts were as a student at University, and it was done as a response to "I bet you couldn't," from some girls doing English literature for an arts degree. I was studying chemistry, and I had maintained this was more practical, and at least science students did something, whereas all they were doing was criticizing. One thing led to another, and I ended up writing my first novel, then a second one. I eventually rewrote the first one, but the second was destroyed.
Read more of this interview.

Where to find Ian Miller online


Books

Biofuels. An Overview.
By
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 55,300. Language: English. Published: July 31, 2014. Category: Nonfiction » Science and Nature » Chemistry / Industrial & Technical
A survey of resource availability and the constraints and advantages of technologies that could be used for biofuels.
Troubles
By
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 142,900. Language: Commonwealth English. Published: June 20, 2012. Category: Fiction » Thriller & suspense » Action & suspense
In the 2150s, the world economies are recovering. Three characters see the opportunities differently. One aims to get rich, and will kill to do so; one wants all opportunities buried in giant corporations, and uses a machine pistol to achieve this; the last, a skilled sniper, wants a return to free enterprise and law and order. Only one can win.
Puppeteer
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 107,940. Language: English. Published: June 27, 2011. Category: Fiction » Science fiction » Adventure
When resource shortages, debt and terrorism threaten to bring anarchy to the world, one man sent on a mission to thwart hi-tech terrorism must find whoever is manipulating both terrorists and antiterrorist forces to bring down governance. When he unravels the plot, his sense of honor is severely tested, but only unimpeachable honor can succeed.

Ian Miller’s tag cloud


Smashwords book reviews by Ian Miller

  • Love Child on Oct. 24, 2014

    I was offered a free copy to review this, and since Amelie is another New Zealand author, I could not refuse. While a reviewer does not need to like what he reads to review it properly, I started with a little trepidation because Love Child is a romance, well outside my usual reading, but to my surprise, I found it quite enjoyable. The story starts in Auckland with Amber becoming pregnant and Dom, the father, without any warning disappearing off to France. Four years later, he returns, finds Amber, and demands an answer to his question. The plot is somewhat unlikely, but is based upon the well-worn premise that while the reader may guess or know what is going on, the protagonists steadfastly create blocks to an increasingly ludicrous situation from unraveling. This is, of course, the method used by Shakespeare in many of his comedies. In this case, Amber does not answer. Indeed, she cannot, because she has no idea what the question is. Dom, ask the question! But then if he did that, there would be no story. What happens next is each encounter simply annoys each participant, their feelings get put away to ferment, and the pressure builds. Then, when it looks as if that has been played enough, another problem arises. Then another, each one leading to more fermentation. Then Dom actually sees the child and realizes he is a father. Oops – they are at it again, with plenty of help from outside. Strictly speaking, this becomes a love (or hate) rectangle. The characters tend to be extreme. Dom is very rich, very good looking (can't we have a below average looker?) and has the empathy quotient of an alligator. Emma, a further cause of trouble, has an EQ that makes a tarantula seem like good company. Jamie, the three-year-old, makes some typical three-year-old contributions. The story is well structured, and keeps up regular intensity and quieter parts, it is well written and maintains interest, as long as the basic premises are accepted.