Joan Adamak

Biography

Fifty years ago, I resided in the beautiful, forested mountains in the NE corner of the State of Washington. In 1960, I joined a small cell of metaphysical seekers in our area, a growing phenomenon in the US, and studied for three years. In 1981 I moved to Seattle, WA and attended metaphysical classes twice weekly for the next ten years. During that time, I compiled a booklet entitled "Atlantis: Fact or Fiction" based on recall by the students had in one of my classes. That story is now available on my website: www.joansmusings.com.

In 1982, I self-published an e-book entitled "Manna for the Millennium." A few years ago I joined my psychic friend, Daeryl Holzer, in researching the aspects of death, encompassed in the e-book "Lifting the Veils of Death." "Manna for the Millennium" is my e-book metaphysics 101 and e-book "Infinite Realities" is the result of my latest research.

I am now trying my hand at writing fiction, of which the first is my Kindle e-book "Phillipa and the Big Scot," a historical romance novel set in the 1880s, beginning in Boston and ending in the Oregon territory. I have written a science fiction novel entitled "The Anunnaki/Illuminati Nemisis."

I review books and products for Amazon Vine and I also do free book reviews for those authors who contact me at joansmusings@hotmail.com. You may also contact me at that site for any questions or comments. I have two blog sites: BookReviewsbyJoan.blogspot.com and Joansmetaphysics.blogspot.com.

Where to find Joan Adamak online


Books

This member has not published any books.

Smashwords book reviews by Joan Adamak

  • The Accidental Anarchist on Jan. 07, 2012

    The Accidental Anarchist From the Diaries of Jacob Marateck By Bryna Kranzler Translated by Shimon Wincelberg and Anita Marateck Wincelberg Bryna Kranzler, the granddaughter of Jacob Marateck, gathered all of the information gleaned by her parents, Shimon and Anita, from the diaries of Jacob Marateck and compiled it into a comprehensive personal journey of Jacob Marateck, capturing the incredibly wry humor of her grandfather. Jacob was a Polish Jew and in 1902 Poland was a part of Russia. Jacob left school when 13 because there was little for Jews in Poland or Russia, tried being a Jewish student for a month, then joined his brother Mordecai as a baker’s assistant for seven years, and when he became disgusted with the 20 to 22 hour workdays, agitated the rest of the crew to revolt. Eventually he lost his baker’s job, but managed to become a labor organizer, without pay, influencing 3,000 other workers to revolt against the Czar, for which eventually he was sentenced to death twice, which he managed to evade. All young men at age twenty-one were automatically conscripted into the Russian Army and he found himself with other Jews, Polish, Russian and German conscripts. Throughout the entire story, Jacob’s suffering and his survival centered on the Jews. For several hundred years, life in Russia for all, other than the aristocracy, was brutal, and especially so the pogroms against the Jews. And it was no different in the Army. Military conditions for everyone in the Russian Army were incredibly bad due to inept officers, lack of food, clothing, and billeting. From the very first the raw conscripts went days hungry, no place to sleep, perpetually wet and freezing cold due to long Russian winters. And the Jews in the military were the last to receive anything. It was the practice of the Russian Officers to send the Jews out first, often without requested armaments so they would get killed. In the early 1900s the Russian Army was sent to Manchuria to fight the Japanese. Jacob told of horrendous military conditions; that more men were killed fighting the Japanese than had died in all of the wars up to the battle of Waterloo. The Russian Army didn’t have any type of modern equipment except rifles, often lacked ammunition, and the officers weren’t trained well in war maneuvers. The Russian units became separated and lost much of the time, sometimes firing on each other. The Japanese were well trained, well equipped and won every battle. Only an armistice saved Jacob and a few of his friends for most of them were killed or died from wounds because of inadequate medical help. About the time of Jacob’s release from the Army, he and his unit had gone four days without sleep, and he fell asleep while on duty. Caught by an officer, the military court condemned him to be executed. At the last moment, the court accepted his defense and changed his sentence to ten years hard labor in Siberia. He spent over a month being shipped north on a rotting barge and then it would take about eight months, weighted down in leg irons, to walk the thousands of miles north to Siberia. Cassocks on horseback guarded the prisoners, who died from exposure, starvation and bodily injuries, if not killed first by a Cassock. Eventually Jacob and a fellow Jew, known in Warsaw as King of the Thieves, escaped and faced new adventures and dangers. This story is written like a novel with drama, romance, conflict, danger, and much Jewish philosophy, but peppered throughout with humorous analogies and metaphors that make light of what otherwise would be a very dark and depressing story. I enjoyed every word of it and recommend it to all readers, especially those who like historical novels for this could be considered one if it wasn’t for the fact that it is non-fiction.
  • Wrong Place Wrong Time on Sep. 30, 2012

    Self-destruction Is Non-negotiable The story opened in England with Dave, a real estate agent, making a sale and a good commission and he stopped at the pub on his way home. His old buddy Michael was there, they hoisted a few, went to a restaurant to eat, ran into a couple of young attractive girls, drank some more, then started driving home, smoking a couple of joints. Dave, now out of his head, decided to use a car park as a Formula One racing track, which he was enjoying when stopped and arrested by the police. His car was confiscated, he spent the night in jail and as a result lost his career job, his commission, his nice apartment and his BMW. His folks suggested he move back in with them. He spent the next few months, a recluse, feeling sorry for himself. He decided he needed to get away and taking the few funds he had left, he flew to Spain to “clear his head.” This was not the first of his escapades nor the last and his addictions caused his family great pain, especially his mother. He could speak no Spanish, decided to treat himself to a four star hotel the first night and after drinking the alcohol there, he went out feeling pretty good and entered a Karaoke Bar. He ran into a couple of Brits there, Kelvin and Anthony, who sang, entertained and set up the karaoke gear. They hired David to help with setting everything up. There he met a girl Emma, whom he took back to his room and they finished the night drinking and having sex. In the morning he realized he had spent most of his cash and spent the morning trying to find a cheaper lodging, which he did at a hostel with a small room, single bed, shower and wardrobe. Per their previous plans, he met the Brits at a bar on the beach, including Kelvin’s beautiful girlfriend Anja. Hungry he ordered a sandwich and was astonished at its cost. He realized he was lucky to have a job to supplement his costs. He did his job fine, ending up drinking with the Brits til he was whacked and spent most of his money on drinks for himself and others. His daily routine was play on the beach, drink, help the Brits in the evening and drink, plus look for an easy lay if available. But then one night Anja was a little too friendly to Dave, Kelvin saw it, beat him up and fired him. His life continued like that until he was out of money, couldn’t find work and couldn’t pay his rent so the landlord tossed him out retaining his belongings until he paid the rent. He ended up sleeping on the beach with a drugged out hippie for a few days with whom he shared his drugs. During this time he met a beautiful girl Rosa whom he drank with and had sex, who later enters his life again, to his misfortune, it turned out. As time passed, he was starving, dirty, and hanging out wherever he could and eating whatever he could find. Eventually he got himself into serious trouble and then truly suffered, facing dire consequences. This story of an addict is not new, but the author, who is the addict in this tale, tells it day by day as he fought his addictions and then succumbed, sometimes with a little excuse and sometimes with no excuse. When he hits bottom, he does like so many and feeds his hunger in whatever way it takes. The novel is not long and in its own way is a page turner. Once I started it, I kept reading to its end. The author does not ask that the reader feel sorry for him. He is just telling it like it was. Will he one day succumb again, which is the bane of all those addicted? Who knows? I recommend this novel as it is interesting and well written.
  • Coming to Astoria: An Immigrant's Tale on Dec. 24, 2012
    (no rating)
    (Non-fiction) An Arab Son Discovers US Culture Omar, son of a Palestinian family, was born in Jordan after his family fled there during one of the wars between Palestine and Israel. Omar said there never was any trouble between the Palestinians and Israelis until other Arab nations decided that Israel shouldn’t exist. This story is based on facets of Omar’s life from his few younger years in Jordan until his father obtained a working visa to enter the United States. Two years later he was able to finance his family’s coming over. Most of Omar’s life was mundane and usual to teenage boys who grew up in the New York area. There were interesting moments when he was attempting to adapt to this new life, and for those readers who haven’t grown up in that atmosphere, would probably find it interesting. But then his struggles to earn money as a teenager, adapt to being a U.S. teenager against the culture of his family, was so typical of the teenage children of Displaced Persons brought to the US after WWII. Off and on throughout the story interesting bits and pieces pop up and he concentrated on his mother’s spoiling of her favorite children and cruel treatment of others, including Omar. Omar spent the last chapter in retrospection about the unfairness of the Arab culture towards their children from arranged marriages, to expecting the children to support them and take care of them. This reviewer did not find anything amiss in his choosing to do this, but perhaps he didn’t realize that many foreign cultures have the same cultural aspect…that their children must help them survive and take care of them in old age. This story was well written and many readers will enjoy it. I am only giving it three stars because there is nothing so spectacular about the presentation of the adjustment of this young man to American lifestyles, other than he was never afraid to find employment and worked hard to accomplish what he set out to do.
  • Coming to Astoria: An Immigrant's Tale on Dec. 24, 2012

    (Non-fiction) An Arab Son Discovers US Culture Omar, son of a Palestinian family, was born in Jordan after his family fled there during one of the wars between Palestine and Israel. Omar said there never was any trouble between the Palestinians and Israelis until other Arab nations decided that Israel shouldn’t exist. This story is based on facets of Omar’s life from his few younger years in Jordan until his father obtained a working visa to enter the United States. Two years later he was able to finance his family’s coming over. Most of Omar’s life was mundane and usual to teenage boys who grew up in the New York area. There were interesting moments when he was attempting to adapt to this new life, and for those readers who haven’t grown up in that atmosphere, would probably find it interesting. But then his struggles to earn money as a teenager, adapt to being a U.S. teenager against the culture of his family, was so typical of the teenage children of Displaced Persons brought to the US after WWII. Off and on throughout the story interesting bits and pieces pop up and he concentrated on his mother’s spoiling of her favorite children and cruel treatment of others, including Omar. Omar spent the last chapter in retrospection about the unfairness of the Arab culture towards their children from arranged marriages, to expecting the children to support them and take care of them. This reviewer did not find anything amiss in his choosing to do this, but perhaps he didn’t realize that many foreign cultures have the same cultural aspect…that their children must help them survive and take care of them in old age. This story was well written and many readers will enjoy it. I am only giving it three stars because there is nothing so spectacular about the presentation of the adjustment of this young man to American lifestyles, other than he was never afraid to find employment and worked hard to accomplish what he set out to do.
  • Forget the Past on Dec. 27, 2012

    Madness, Murder and Mystery Psychiatrist Patricia Bellows, a beautiful forty-year old woman and recently widowed, owned a psychiatric clinic and hospital and hired four other psychiatrists and two registered nurses. She had inherited the funds from her deceased husband with which to build it. The story opened with her counseling Anya Horvat, who although thirty-five years old, could not sustain a relationship with a man. Anya was particularly hesitant to discuss any of her thoughts relative to sex, feeling it was unimportant in a relationship. When Anya left the clinic, her car wouldn’t start and she saw a large man eyeing the clinic. She called him over and demanded that he look at her motor. Finally he did, but couldn’t fix it and called a garage to come tow it. He later became an important person in her life. Dr. Bellows lived in an expensive two thousand-foot apartment and was found by her maid dead in bed, her body covered with countless cuts. Anya who was a journalist was then visited by Patricia’s sister, Bertha Hoff and her husband, Hunter. Bertha complained that the police were doing very little after a few days having passed. She told Anya she knew who killed her sister and it was Benny Martin, Patricia’s lover. She wanted Anya to investigate Benny and find the proof so he could be arrested. Anya had only been a journalist two years and knew nothing about investigative reporting, but later when talking to her employer Pamela, the owner and publisher of the newspaper Clarice, Pamela told her she was broke and the newspaper would be closing in three months and if Anya could find out enough facts to make it a good story for the newspaper, perhaps the paper could become solvent again. And thus began a story consisting of several subplots, all of which seemed to lead back to Dr. Bellows and several of her patients, a few of whom were also found dead. The author did a nice job of using Dr. Bellows’ diaries to cover flashbacks bringing the reader forward. The patients’ histories and their present lives lead the reader on a never-ending quest of who was the murderer and/or murderers and why? In fact, the reader never discovers the answers until almost the end of the story. After the first few chapters to get me acquainted with the action, it became a page turner. It was a very entertaining tale and I truly enjoyed it.
  • Winston's Kingdom [Winston Trilogy Book III] on April 19, 2013

    WINSTON’S KINGDOM, Winston’s Trilogy Book III By Stan I.S. Law Out of Many One And such was the entire theme of this final book. Peter Thornton and Cathy have married and he still has nightmares going back to when he was a physician. A reoccurring nightmare was him running down halls of a hospital seeking a patient, and there were none. He and Cathy own a condo on the 49th floor of an apartment house, which is like their private Eden, and they have a magnificent open view of Mount Royal. Peter does not thrive unless he is immersed totally in some project and when his widowed sister-in-law Ruth Thornton became head of Solidarity International in North America, there was always some task that Ruth or Lena, head of Solidarity International in the Vatican set him to. Winston was always still there to encourage Peter in developing his skills, including seeing auras and interpreting them and mind reading. Peter discovered that many of the leading Solidarity people have doppelgangers as doubles as many politicians now have doubles as a security measure. These doppelgangers were not human but made by nanotechnology. But because even Solidarity’s foes could plant these doubles in highly secured places, the only way to spot them was if they had no auras. Peter was called upon to check out any suspicious ones. The head of security was a nano named J.R. and the minds of a nano works many times faster than a human and hence, their value. J.R. and Peter worked closely together and the vast abilities of this robot fills in some of the interesting episodes of this story To me, Book III is the most interesting of the trilogy. It finalizes many of the physical and metaphysical aspects touched on in the first two books, but they are more dramaticly interspersed in between constructive and destructive scenarios. Winston revealed who he truly is and he taught very succinctly many physical principles, making the reader understand that the only difference is that when the physical is not understood, it is then named “metaphysical.” As a student of metaphysics since 1960, I enjoyed the simplicity of Winston’s teachings plus the drama of the novel. This novel is not light reading, but it is worthy of any reader who likes to plumb new ideas, new depths and challenges for in many instances, these ideas are not acceptable to others, but they will make you think. I recommend this book, especially to those readers who have read the first two books.
  • ELOHIM-Masters & Minions [Winston Trilogy Book Two] on April 19, 2013

    ELOHIM-MASTERS AND MINIONS (Winston Trilogy Book 2) By Stan I.S.Law Profound, Deep, Enlightening, Entertaining This book is so deep and profound that it is difficult to write a review that does it justice. Following up to the first book of this trilogy, Dr. Peter Thornton has been a recluse for a year, living with his sister, Ruth Thornton, and her two children, Moira and Jonathan. In Book 1 he was discovered to be a natural healer, beyond his abilities as an educated and trained physician, and because he had allowed himself to be called upon to heal the very poor and desperate without thought for himself, it broke his health and he has spent the past year asking himself, “Why me?” Winston Smith, combination major domo, butler, cook and nanny is always present to answer his questions, sometimes physically and many times through mental telepathy. Ruth Thornton is working under Lena Walesa of Solidarity International, together with Sino Indian Block and America to straighten the world out and eliminate war and suffering, but there is a strong wave against it, determined to destroy it. Dr. Catherine Mondellay, aka Cathy, helped Peter to recover his health and they are in love, but Cathy is as much devoted to being a physicist as being in love with Peter. She comes from a family of scientists and throughout the book, various modern scientific paths are discussed such as quantum physics, black holes, genetics, bionics, nanotechnology, all of them. The reader does not need to totally understand these different sciences because they are well explained. Interspersed among these scientists and explanations of their field are deep philosophical and metaphysical discussions and Winston teaches Peter how to read auras and recognize his god self. This is a long book, but well written and there is enough romance and normal actions to keep the reader interested. I recommend this book for those who truly like to receive worthwhile information with their novels. This book was given to me by the author at my request.
  • Wind River Refuge on Nov. 23, 2013
    (no rating)
    WIND RIVER REFUGE By J.M. Anton Loaded with action, danger and romance This novel is a page turner from beginning to end. Jax is the beautiful, petite, fiery foster daughter of Maggie and Dex McBride. Dex’s Cousin, Garrett McBride is to pick Jax up at the Denver airport. Garrett is a large, handsome, strong male, although suffering from PTSD as a Nam Vet. He becomes angry quickly and has little patience and he meets his counterpart in Jax. From the very first, there is a continual friction and admiration between these two, but neither wants to admit this weakness. Their on-again, off-again romance heightens the danger for Jax as there is a murderer on the loose, whom no one can identify and it is only through attempts on Jax’s life that this becomes obvious. The author does a tremendous task of character building with her several actors in this story so that you feel you know each main character thoroughly, and this plot is different than most plots because of this particular essence of danger always lingering. I highly enjoyed this story and recommend it. I was given this e-book free for an honest review.
  • Gift of Gamman on June 01, 2015

    Review by: Joan Adamak on June 1, 2015 Stars: This is one of the best sci-fi novels I have read because there is the possibility that Earth could face the events that occur in this novel; thus the story seems more than fantasy. In order to understand the novel, it is necessary to read the prologue, although because it was the first portion of the story, it didn’t really register in my mind. But as it progresses, an astronaut, John Galt, has been traveling alone in a space ship for over 200 years in a state of suspension except when he regained consciousness enough to make changes in the ship’s controls. Although he is actually over 200 years old, he looks about forty because the body is dormant and does not age while in suspension. When he is called back to Earth, he meets with Commander Hermes D Grant, whom he had met sixty years prior and since Grant is confined to the time of Earth, he is aged and not expected to live long. Grant explains to Galt that the populace of Earth has abused it for years through pollution, over-population, and destructive chemicals. The Earth can only last eighty years more. Most of the population does nothing but sleep, and the Federation Council gets nothing accomplished because they don’t know how to do anything but yell at each other. Grant asks Galt to go as far as he can in space and determine if there is another planet that can take Earth’s population when they can no longer be sustained here. Galt agrees and is given the first spaceship of its kind that has been built while he was away. It is huge, can take 47 people and automatically adjusts its controls when necessary. Galt is also introduced to a woman, name Delta, who will act as his aid; she is beautiful, extremely intelligent, trained to the max and seems able to read his mind. The story is the search they make as they approach various planets in our corner of space, being chased by pirates, going to maximum warp of ten g’s, and entering outer space where no Earthling has ever been. The attraction between Delta and John has a surprising twist. The reality of the story is while John and Delta are directing the spaceship the reader feels like he is there, living the moments. At the same time, the author, as usual, throws in some philosophy, spirituality, and human weaknesses and strengths with the mystique that enhances the story. I recommend this novel story to even those readers who don’t enjoy genres of this type, for it is so much more than just sci fi.
  • Yeshua - Personal Memoir of the Missing Years of Jesus on June 29, 2015
    (no rating)
    YESHUA A PERSONAL MEMOIR OF THE MISSING YEARS OF JESUS By Stan I. S. Law 5 stars Love in all of its aspects In the Christian Bible there are only twenty-two sentences attributed to having been said by Jesus. And those who have studied the Bible are aware that the New Testament chapters were decided by the Council of Nicene and the rest were ignored. The Gnostic Library is on line and they have many chapters by different disciples, followers and Mary Magdalene and if you read hers, you find that she cries because Peter refuses to listen to her and the apostles didn’t understand much of what Jesus told them. She is explaining what he meant for he and Mary were close and he discussed much with her. Then we have the revelations by Edgar Cayce about Jesus and there are other well known books who tell of Jesus’ life, even when he traveled through India into Tibet when he was known by the name of Issa. Of course, all of the above is open to debate for there is nothing to prove anything about Jesus. There is no Roman record of him having been crucified. So on the basis of so much material, whether true or not, the author developed a novel about this man and presented him as the author saw him. Using the person of Satya as his friend and to generate the dialogue of Yeshua’s ideas and his adventures causes one to contemplate the philosophies of Judaism, Socrates, Plato, Aristotle, Buddhism, Zarathustra, Nervana and Krishna. Jesus complained about the Essenes being so strict and based on what is available describing this sect, this was true based on the few scrolls believed to have been left by them, although they were not found at Qumran. What this story does is force the reader to consider other aspects about this man and the times as the different groups of the Christian religion are most dogmatic in their beliefs, and yet all we have to back up our religious beliefs is what we have been told. If you readers can let go of your dogmas and just read it like a new language and contemplate these ideas and philosophies, you may find a broader view of being a Christian and just follow the basic rule of life that Yeshua subscribed to, which was “You shall love God first and then your brother as yourself.” Such rules would certainly help bring peace and understanding to the planet, which we now do not have. I received a complimentary copy of the e-book for an honest review.