Joan Adamak

Biography

Fifty years ago, I resided in the beautiful, forested mountains in the NE corner of the State of Washington. In 1960, I joined a small cell of metaphysical seekers in our area, a growing phenomenon in the US, and studied for three years. In 1981 I moved to Seattle, WA and attended metaphysical classes twice weekly for the next ten years. During that time, I compiled a booklet entitled "Atlantis: Fact or Fiction" based on recall by the students had in one of my classes. That story is now available on my website: www.joansmusings.com.

In 1982, I self-published an e-book entitled "Manna for the Millennium." A few years ago I joined my psychic friend, Daeryl Holzer, in researching the aspects of death, encompassed in the e-book "Lifting the Veils of Death." "Manna for the Millennium" is my e-book metaphysics 101 and e-book "Infinite Realities" is the result of my latest research.

I am now trying my hand at writing fiction, of which the first is my Kindle e-book "Phillipa and the Big Scot," a historical romance novel set in the 1880s, beginning in Boston and ending in the Oregon territory. I have written a science fiction novel entitled "The Anunnaki/Illuminati Nemisis."

I review books and products for Amazon Vine and I also do free book reviews for those authors who contact me at joansmusings@hotmail.com. You may also contact me at that site for any questions or comments. I have two blog sites: BookReviewsbyJoan.blogspot.com and Joansmetaphysics.blogspot.com.

Where to find Joan Adamak online


Books

This member has not published any books.

Smashwords book reviews by Joan Adamak

  • Wrong Place Wrong Time on Sep. 30, 2012

    Self-destruction Is Non-negotiable The story opened in England with Dave, a real estate agent, making a sale and a good commission and he stopped at the pub on his way home. His old buddy Michael was there, they hoisted a few, went to a restaurant to eat, ran into a couple of young attractive girls, drank some more, then started driving home, smoking a couple of joints. Dave, now out of his head, decided to use a car park as a Formula One racing track, which he was enjoying when stopped and arrested by the police. His car was confiscated, he spent the night in jail and as a result lost his career job, his commission, his nice apartment and his BMW. His folks suggested he move back in with them. He spent the next few months, a recluse, feeling sorry for himself. He decided he needed to get away and taking the few funds he had left, he flew to Spain to “clear his head.” This was not the first of his escapades nor the last and his addictions caused his family great pain, especially his mother. He could speak no Spanish, decided to treat himself to a four star hotel the first night and after drinking the alcohol there, he went out feeling pretty good and entered a Karaoke Bar. He ran into a couple of Brits there, Kelvin and Anthony, who sang, entertained and set up the karaoke gear. They hired David to help with setting everything up. There he met a girl Emma, whom he took back to his room and they finished the night drinking and having sex. In the morning he realized he had spent most of his cash and spent the morning trying to find a cheaper lodging, which he did at a hostel with a small room, single bed, shower and wardrobe. Per their previous plans, he met the Brits at a bar on the beach, including Kelvin’s beautiful girlfriend Anja. Hungry he ordered a sandwich and was astonished at its cost. He realized he was lucky to have a job to supplement his costs. He did his job fine, ending up drinking with the Brits til he was whacked and spent most of his money on drinks for himself and others. His daily routine was play on the beach, drink, help the Brits in the evening and drink, plus look for an easy lay if available. But then one night Anja was a little too friendly to Dave, Kelvin saw it, beat him up and fired him. His life continued like that until he was out of money, couldn’t find work and couldn’t pay his rent so the landlord tossed him out retaining his belongings until he paid the rent. He ended up sleeping on the beach with a drugged out hippie for a few days with whom he shared his drugs. During this time he met a beautiful girl Rosa whom he drank with and had sex, who later enters his life again, to his misfortune, it turned out. As time passed, he was starving, dirty, and hanging out wherever he could and eating whatever he could find. Eventually he got himself into serious trouble and then truly suffered, facing dire consequences. This story of an addict is not new, but the author, who is the addict in this tale, tells it day by day as he fought his addictions and then succumbed, sometimes with a little excuse and sometimes with no excuse. When he hits bottom, he does like so many and feeds his hunger in whatever way it takes. The novel is not long and in its own way is a page turner. Once I started it, I kept reading to its end. The author does not ask that the reader feel sorry for him. He is just telling it like it was. Will he one day succumb again, which is the bane of all those addicted? Who knows? I recommend this novel as it is interesting and well written.
  • Coming to Astoria: An Immigrant's Tale on Dec. 24, 2012
    (no rating)
    (Non-fiction) An Arab Son Discovers US Culture Omar, son of a Palestinian family, was born in Jordan after his family fled there during one of the wars between Palestine and Israel. Omar said there never was any trouble between the Palestinians and Israelis until other Arab nations decided that Israel shouldn’t exist. This story is based on facets of Omar’s life from his few younger years in Jordan until his father obtained a working visa to enter the United States. Two years later he was able to finance his family’s coming over. Most of Omar’s life was mundane and usual to teenage boys who grew up in the New York area. There were interesting moments when he was attempting to adapt to this new life, and for those readers who haven’t grown up in that atmosphere, would probably find it interesting. But then his struggles to earn money as a teenager, adapt to being a U.S. teenager against the culture of his family, was so typical of the teenage children of Displaced Persons brought to the US after WWII. Off and on throughout the story interesting bits and pieces pop up and he concentrated on his mother’s spoiling of her favorite children and cruel treatment of others, including Omar. Omar spent the last chapter in retrospection about the unfairness of the Arab culture towards their children from arranged marriages, to expecting the children to support them and take care of them. This reviewer did not find anything amiss in his choosing to do this, but perhaps he didn’t realize that many foreign cultures have the same cultural aspect…that their children must help them survive and take care of them in old age. This story was well written and many readers will enjoy it. I am only giving it three stars because there is nothing so spectacular about the presentation of the adjustment of this young man to American lifestyles, other than he was never afraid to find employment and worked hard to accomplish what he set out to do.
  • Coming to Astoria: An Immigrant's Tale on Dec. 24, 2012

    (Non-fiction) An Arab Son Discovers US Culture Omar, son of a Palestinian family, was born in Jordan after his family fled there during one of the wars between Palestine and Israel. Omar said there never was any trouble between the Palestinians and Israelis until other Arab nations decided that Israel shouldn’t exist. This story is based on facets of Omar’s life from his few younger years in Jordan until his father obtained a working visa to enter the United States. Two years later he was able to finance his family’s coming over. Most of Omar’s life was mundane and usual to teenage boys who grew up in the New York area. There were interesting moments when he was attempting to adapt to this new life, and for those readers who haven’t grown up in that atmosphere, would probably find it interesting. But then his struggles to earn money as a teenager, adapt to being a U.S. teenager against the culture of his family, was so typical of the teenage children of Displaced Persons brought to the US after WWII. Off and on throughout the story interesting bits and pieces pop up and he concentrated on his mother’s spoiling of her favorite children and cruel treatment of others, including Omar. Omar spent the last chapter in retrospection about the unfairness of the Arab culture towards their children from arranged marriages, to expecting the children to support them and take care of them. This reviewer did not find anything amiss in his choosing to do this, but perhaps he didn’t realize that many foreign cultures have the same cultural aspect…that their children must help them survive and take care of them in old age. This story was well written and many readers will enjoy it. I am only giving it three stars because there is nothing so spectacular about the presentation of the adjustment of this young man to American lifestyles, other than he was never afraid to find employment and worked hard to accomplish what he set out to do.
  • Forget the Past on Dec. 27, 2012

    Madness, Murder and Mystery Psychiatrist Patricia Bellows, a beautiful forty-year old woman and recently widowed, owned a psychiatric clinic and hospital and hired four other psychiatrists and two registered nurses. She had inherited the funds from her deceased husband with which to build it. The story opened with her counseling Anya Horvat, who although thirty-five years old, could not sustain a relationship with a man. Anya was particularly hesitant to discuss any of her thoughts relative to sex, feeling it was unimportant in a relationship. When Anya left the clinic, her car wouldn’t start and she saw a large man eyeing the clinic. She called him over and demanded that he look at her motor. Finally he did, but couldn’t fix it and called a garage to come tow it. He later became an important person in her life. Dr. Bellows lived in an expensive two thousand-foot apartment and was found by her maid dead in bed, her body covered with countless cuts. Anya who was a journalist was then visited by Patricia’s sister, Bertha Hoff and her husband, Hunter. Bertha complained that the police were doing very little after a few days having passed. She told Anya she knew who killed her sister and it was Benny Martin, Patricia’s lover. She wanted Anya to investigate Benny and find the proof so he could be arrested. Anya had only been a journalist two years and knew nothing about investigative reporting, but later when talking to her employer Pamela, the owner and publisher of the newspaper Clarice, Pamela told her she was broke and the newspaper would be closing in three months and if Anya could find out enough facts to make it a good story for the newspaper, perhaps the paper could become solvent again. And thus began a story consisting of several subplots, all of which seemed to lead back to Dr. Bellows and several of her patients, a few of whom were also found dead. The author did a nice job of using Dr. Bellows’ diaries to cover flashbacks bringing the reader forward. The patients’ histories and their present lives lead the reader on a never-ending quest of who was the murderer and/or murderers and why? In fact, the reader never discovers the answers until almost the end of the story. After the first few chapters to get me acquainted with the action, it became a page turner. It was a very entertaining tale and I truly enjoyed it.
  • Winston's Kingdom [Winston Trilogy Book III] on April 19, 2013

    WINSTON’S KINGDOM, Winston’s Trilogy Book III By Stan I.S. Law Out of Many One And such was the entire theme of this final book. Peter Thornton and Cathy have married and he still has nightmares going back to when he was a physician. A reoccurring nightmare was him running down halls of a hospital seeking a patient, and there were none. He and Cathy own a condo on the 49th floor of an apartment house, which is like their private Eden, and they have a magnificent open view of Mount Royal. Peter does not thrive unless he is immersed totally in some project and when his widowed sister-in-law Ruth Thornton became head of Solidarity International in North America, there was always some task that Ruth or Lena, head of Solidarity International in the Vatican set him to. Winston was always still there to encourage Peter in developing his skills, including seeing auras and interpreting them and mind reading. Peter discovered that many of the leading Solidarity people have doppelgangers as doubles as many politicians now have doubles as a security measure. These doppelgangers were not human but made by nanotechnology. But because even Solidarity’s foes could plant these doubles in highly secured places, the only way to spot them was if they had no auras. Peter was called upon to check out any suspicious ones. The head of security was a nano named J.R. and the minds of a nano works many times faster than a human and hence, their value. J.R. and Peter worked closely together and the vast abilities of this robot fills in some of the interesting episodes of this story To me, Book III is the most interesting of the trilogy. It finalizes many of the physical and metaphysical aspects touched on in the first two books, but they are more dramaticly interspersed in between constructive and destructive scenarios. Winston revealed who he truly is and he taught very succinctly many physical principles, making the reader understand that the only difference is that when the physical is not understood, it is then named “metaphysical.” As a student of metaphysics since 1960, I enjoyed the simplicity of Winston’s teachings plus the drama of the novel. This novel is not light reading, but it is worthy of any reader who likes to plumb new ideas, new depths and challenges for in many instances, these ideas are not acceptable to others, but they will make you think. I recommend this book, especially to those readers who have read the first two books.
  • ELOHIM-Masters & Minions [Winston Trilogy Book Two] on April 19, 2013

    ELOHIM-MASTERS AND MINIONS (Winston Trilogy Book 2) By Stan I.S.Law Profound, Deep, Enlightening, Entertaining This book is so deep and profound that it is difficult to write a review that does it justice. Following up to the first book of this trilogy, Dr. Peter Thornton has been a recluse for a year, living with his sister, Ruth Thornton, and her two children, Moira and Jonathan. In Book 1 he was discovered to be a natural healer, beyond his abilities as an educated and trained physician, and because he had allowed himself to be called upon to heal the very poor and desperate without thought for himself, it broke his health and he has spent the past year asking himself, “Why me?” Winston Smith, combination major domo, butler, cook and nanny is always present to answer his questions, sometimes physically and many times through mental telepathy. Ruth Thornton is working under Lena Walesa of Solidarity International, together with Sino Indian Block and America to straighten the world out and eliminate war and suffering, but there is a strong wave against it, determined to destroy it. Dr. Catherine Mondellay, aka Cathy, helped Peter to recover his health and they are in love, but Cathy is as much devoted to being a physicist as being in love with Peter. She comes from a family of scientists and throughout the book, various modern scientific paths are discussed such as quantum physics, black holes, genetics, bionics, nanotechnology, all of them. The reader does not need to totally understand these different sciences because they are well explained. Interspersed among these scientists and explanations of their field are deep philosophical and metaphysical discussions and Winston teaches Peter how to read auras and recognize his god self. This is a long book, but well written and there is enough romance and normal actions to keep the reader interested. I recommend this book for those who truly like to receive worthwhile information with their novels. This book was given to me by the author at my request.
  • Alec [Alexander Trilogy Book One] on Oct. 20, 2013

    ALEC: ALEXANDER TRILOGY BOOK 1 By Stan I.S. Law 5 stars Coming of Age Novel Book 1 encompassed the normal events of Alec’s life. At age thirteen Alec seemed to ignore reading and so his mother, Alicia, read to him. His imagination took over and he would spin his own story. His mother worried that it was Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, only he wasn’t that active. Alicia took it up with his father Alex Baldwin, Sr. who felt it had to do with raging hormones. Whatever caught his attention, Alec became in his mental movies. But Alec, regardless of his seeming inattention, was an excellent student. Anything that caught his mind caused him to research it thoroughly until he knew more than the books. He was ten when he commenced having these visions. As time passed, his visions became so real that he experiences his senses of feeling and smell, besides sight. Finally Alicia took him to a psychologist, Dr. Schmidthosen, whom Alec instantly disliked. Alicia was a beautiful, trim woman and attracted the doctor more than her son did. Alicia noticed the doctor wasn’t paying any attention to Alec’s problem and left. At age thirteen, Alex gave Alec a computer, and he traveled the world and the ages, withdrawing into himself as Alec had to experience his information as real and not as some detached fragment of history. One day Alec saw a beautiful girl in a mirror. Later, he could hear her and she called herself Princess Sandra. Alec became her knight, and whenever he was bored or needed answers to his questions, when he thought of her, she appeared. They spent hours and hours philosophizing, and Sandra attempting to explain how she fit into Alec’s life. She said she was part of him and would always be there for him. The story continued with Alec struggling to make sense of what Sandra said; Alicia, having a talent for painting formed a painting club; and Alex, a good husband and provider , was rather dull and very aware of Alicia’s attraction to other men. Alec continued to mature, became enamored with a girl two years older than himself, and went through the usual stages of teen on-again, off-again. Although the dialogues between Sandra and Alec were most thoughtful and far-reaching, still Alec had the usual ups and downs of becoming a man and his parents did also in their own right as a married couple. I feel that parents of precocious teenagers will truly enjoy this story and perhaps become a little more enlightened as to how maturing children think. I recommend this book and look forward to the next two books in this trilogy covering the paranormal and supernormal.
  • Wind River Refuge on Nov. 23, 2013
    (no rating)
    WIND RIVER REFUGE By J.M. Anton Loaded with action, danger and romance This novel is a page turner from beginning to end. Jax is the beautiful, petite, fiery foster daughter of Maggie and Dex McBride. Dex’s Cousin, Garrett McBride is to pick Jax up at the Denver airport. Garrett is a large, handsome, strong male, although suffering from PTSD as a Nam Vet. He becomes angry quickly and has little patience and he meets his counterpart in Jax. From the very first, there is a continual friction and admiration between these two, but neither wants to admit this weakness. Their on-again, off-again romance heightens the danger for Jax as there is a murderer on the loose, whom no one can identify and it is only through attempts on Jax’s life that this becomes obvious. The author does a tremendous task of character building with her several actors in this story so that you feel you know each main character thoroughly, and this plot is different than most plots because of this particular essence of danger always lingering. I highly enjoyed this story and recommend it. I was given this e-book free for an honest review.