Andrew Kuligowski

Books

This member has not published any books.

Smashwords book reviews by Andrew Kuligowski

  • A True Bizarre Story on Jan. 23, 2013

    Cannot condemn the author, cannot truly praise him, either. Middle of the road effort, would have benefitted from a firm hand of a 3rd party editor or equivalent that could have asked some questions and gotten answers before publication. That process can be painful, but it would have transformed a so-so effort into an excellent one. The middle/end of the story is being told in the first person. The beginning - in the 3rd. Is it the same the narrator; does he have some insight into events, or have we (awkwardly) swapped voices? What the h-ll is the leprechaun doing in a Hindu household? etc. etc. (don't want the review to be longer than the book, don't want to risk spoilers) On the plus side, the basic story is interesting, and the ending also leaves a question or two for the reader to answer based on their reading and their own experience / values.
  • Biggle and Bee on Feb. 09, 2013

    A pleasant little read, reminding younger readers not to judge good or bad based on first impressions.
  • Under A Painted Sky on Feb. 28, 2013

    “Under A Painted Sky” is the first novel in what is anticipated to be a series called “Spirit Warriors”. I believe it is also the first published novel by independent author Jenna Roads. Ms. Roads tells the story of Isabella Reed, a divorced young woman who accepts an invitation from her aunt to pursue an escape and new start in New Mexico. I don't believe it'll be much of a spoiler to say that she gets both. Ms. Roads pacing is deceptive. My original thought was that the book is developing very slowly – until I realized I was quickly through ¾ of the text without realizing it! Perhaps it is because I don't read a lot of books that fit either the “romance” or “paranormal” category, let alone combines the two like this one does. (And they SHOULD be listed separately; they are two different aspects of the book. It's not like our protagonist falls in love with the ghost of a young Spanish conquistador or something to make it a “paranormal romance”!) The strongest aspect of Ms. Roads' work is how her obvious love of Albuquerque pours out in her descriptions of the city and its various sites. I also loved what I saw of the city during a visit around 10 years ago, but haven't been able to back – until this week, when Ms. Roads took me by the hand and guided me to her favorite locales. Old Town, Sandia, El Pinto (perhaps my favorite restaurant in the US!), and more. I visited some of those sites, and others will have to be on my “to do” list for my next trip, whenever it is. Of course, I would ALSO like to see our young couple visit the Biological Park (Zoo, Aquarium, and Botanical Gardens) – maybe they'll do that in the next book? First person narrative is a lot more difficult to successfully pull off than most folks – readers and writers – realize. You need to stay in character, but avoid too many verbal tics. The narrator can't reveal things that the character has no way to actually know (although this is not as much a problem if the book is told in hindsight). Ms. Roads' avoided the second trap, but did trip over the first issue on occasion. Most notable is when she lapses into a common trap of the 1st person narrative … “I” problems. “I walked in the door. I closed the door. I called for a pizza with peppers and olives. I paid the delivery guy. ...” A strong editor or courageous beta reader should be able to warn our author when these types of things show up before her next book is published. The curmudgeon in me grumbles, “It's a work from a new author who needs an editor who'll do more than correct spelling and grammar.” But even that grouch side of my personality admits that there is a very strong base to work from. The fatherly side of me seriously wants to see her nurture and grow her storytelling abilities. After all, Ms. Roads has successfully accomplished two things that really hook me into a story: I LIKE the main characters, and the locale is important enough to the tale that it has almost become one of those characters! One day in the not-too-distant future, successful author Jenna Roads will look back on this first work and say something like “Oh G-d, I can't believe I used to write like THAT.” In other households, there will be readers, looking at copies of this book, saying, “Dear G-d, I WISH I could write like THAT.” DISCLOSURE: I was given a copy of this book by a friend, with the agreement that I would write an honest and unbiased review. (And that I would do so quickly!) Thanks, Tina!
  • Erin The Fire Goddess: The Beginning on June 16, 2013

    I thought that Lavinia Urban's “Erin, the Fire Goddess: The Beginning” was a good novel. First in a YA paranormal series, “Erin ... The Beginning” introduces a loner high school student, Erin, and her family as they begin a new phase of their lives – moving to a new town, and enrolling in a new school. It has been a few years since my high school days – heck, it's been a few years since my daughter graduated high school! – but even now, I remember the emotions much, much more than the historic details. I'm sure that this aspect of school has not evolved greatly since MY grandparents were in school, and don't expect it to change in the next generation or two, either! Ms. Urban captures this feeling in her characters – our loner hero, her popular sister who has her own secret insecurities, and the other “types” that inhabit high schools. Further, Ms. Urban managed to hook me; I didn't know what was going to happen next. Predictability turns me off in a novel; “Erin ... The Beginning” sure had little to none of that! Lest anyone believe I'm anointing this my favorite novel of the year, I must temper my earlier comments. I thought Ms. Urban's pacing, especially towards the end of the novel, to be of mixed quality. There were times I couldn't wait to see what happened next; there were other times I just wished SOMETHING would happen next – and soon! In addition, Ms. Urban's editor, if she employed one, did not do their job well. There were formatting errors, as well as problems with spelling, punctuation, and grammar – not as many as I have seen in some other independent efforts, but enough to be occasionally distracting to this reader. I am looking forward to Ms. Urban's next effort. I'd give it 3 1/2 stars, but it's fair and accurate to round up to 4. DISCLOSURE: I was given a free copy of this book in return for an honest (and prompt) review.
  • Army of Skeletons on June 19, 2013

    W. Freedreamer Tinkanesh's "Army of Skeletons" was good, great, and disappointing. Yes, all of those descriptions, and more, were accurate given the multiple themes of the short story. A GLBT love story in the alternative London music scene? Check. Good, kept my interest. A horror story / fantasy? Check-minus. Without going into details and risking a spoiler, we took an incredible and sudden style turn in this story. The premise and contents of what is provided whetted my appetite. Problem is, there WASN'T any more!! Tinkanesh attempted to cram a novella - maybe TWO novellas - into a short story. Can't be done. I think this needed to be at LEAST 5 times as long as it is to even begin to flesh out what's provided. 3 1/2 stars, rounded down to 3. DISCLOSURE: This story was available for free on Smashwords, where I grabbed it without condition. It was not a gift, no review was promised, etc.
  • Talented (Talented Saga #1) on July 12, 2013

    “Talented” is the title of a book by Sophie Davis, and an apt description of the author as well. The book aims at several potential sets of readers, and largely reaches the mark for most of them. YA: Young woman coming of age – although her “learning to be independent” phase is partially replaced by “learning to be interdependent” with a team. Romance: Boyfriend? Check. Potential conflict in that area? Check. Check. (A little too much emphasis on this aspect for my personal taste, BUT for others the book may have insufficient coverage of this area, so take my comment with a grain of salt.) Science Fiction: The worlds' oceans and its surviving inhabitants have been damaged due to radioactivity leaks. The country has broken into two separate nations, based largely on their opinion of how to deal with those born with “talents” - what a large comic company would refer to as “mutants”. Transportation is handled via hover-cars. And I could go on. Superhero: See “Science Fiction” above. And those are just the major categories. There are nods to several others. I LIKED this book. This book may not be easily categorized into only one category, but LIFE does not easily group itself into one category, either, so I consider that to be a major PLUS. The book, like so many others, is done in first person narration. Fortunately, unlike many other independent and small-publisher outputs, this narration does not suffer from “I”-disease. (“I awoke … I ate breakfast … I went to the john ...”) Ms. Davis properly recognizes that narration must describe the scene and the action, and how our protagonist is reacting those aspects is only one component of the job. This is the first in a series. The second book, as well as a novella, are both out as well. I'm adding them to my TBR list. DISCLOSURE: This book was offered for free download by the author to any and all interested. An honest review was requested in return, but not a requirement.
  • Pawn (Nightmares Trilogy #1) on Oct. 06, 2013

    It's tough to be graduating high school. To be crossing over that threshold from teenager to adult, from High School to college and/or the work force, to … to be haunted by dreams, to have some sort of electrical discharge that can short circuit small appliances and devices, to believe a mermaid-like creature has tried to drown you … OK, so Endora Lee Andrews, also known as “Eel” as both a play on her name AND for her electrical oddity, may be facing more issues than your typical graduating teenager. Pawn is the second of Sophie Davis' books that I've read this year. I liked our protagonist, Endora, but I was suspicious of all of her friends and of the adults in this book. SOMETHING felt wrong … if this was the sensation that Ms. Davis was aiming for, it worked. However, I never shook the sense of paranoia that anyone, any time, could turn out to not be what they seemed. It's tougher to enjoy a book when you're constantly looking over your shoulder and that of the heroine. RATING: 4 stars. DISCLOSURE: To be honest, I don't recall if I got this for free or if I paid a nominal fee for it. Either way, I DID promise the author I would give it an honest review upon completion.
  • Finding Hope on Jan. 12, 2014

    Finding Hope is a short – SHORT – story. Do not let its length confuse you, for it is also an incredibly powerful work. Author Bree Vanderland gives us a glimpse into a young woman whose typically teenage years are being further complicated by being bullied. The young woman, Hope, is looking back on her recent past, weighing it against her vision of her perspective future, and deciding whether or not it is worth sticking around for. If the author lived through this decision, then I for one am glad for her brave decision to continue on; the adult version demonstrates so much potential with this work. If she based this on observation of others, then her empathy and ability to transcribe her surroundings is incredible for a woman of her age – no matter what that age is. I actually see this “short story” as the prologue to a longer work, addressing the changes that her choosing to live / die would have on those around her. (Bree, please check out Mitch Albom's The Time Keeper for an example.) RATING: I'm giving the author 5 stars. The work is memorable and will stay with me – plus, it lacks noticeable annoying flaws. In summary, that's what a 5 star is to this reviewer.