Mike Reeves-McMillan

Biography

Mike Reeves-McMillan lives in Auckland, New Zealand, surrounded by trees.
He’s almost certainly the world’s only steampunk-fantasy author who holds a master’s degree in English, a certificate in health science, an Advanced Diploma of Hypnotherapy and a certificate in celebrant studies (rituals for transition through crisis). He's worked as an editor for a major publishing house, which is just one of the reasons he has no interest in being published by a major publishing house.

Where to find Mike Reeves-McMillan online


Where to buy in print


Books

Gu
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 34,720. Language: English. Published: July 5, 2012. Category: Fiction » Science fiction » High tech
When Callie Arnold and her team created Gu, they knew they were making the last manufactured thing. Because Gu can be anything, can take any shape. Fifteen years later, documentary maker Susan Halwaz is interviewing the team and other experts, fans and opponents of Gu about how it's changed their lives.
Your Emotional Hamster Wheel and How to Get Off It
By
Price: Free! Words: 6,660. Language: English. Published: January 16, 2012. Category: Nonfiction » Self-improvement » Emotional healing
Do you find yourself having the same emotional reactions again and again, and feel like there’s nothing you can do about it? Are you just driven to repeat patterns that don’t make any sense? It’s a common human problem, and in this ebook I explore one model of why it happens and what practical steps you can take to change it.
How to Stop Smoking
By
Price: Free! Words: 7,360. Language: English. Published: December 29, 2010. Category: Nonfiction » Health, wellbeing, & medicine » Reference
Simple advice from a health coach and hypnotherapist on how to stop smoking, including health effects of smoking, benefits of giving up smoking (with timeline), how to deal with quit smoking withdrawal symptoms, how to quit smoking without gaining weight, and motivation to quit smoking.
City of Masks
By
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 50,520. Language: English. Published: April 26, 2009. Category: Fiction » Science fiction » General
(4.25)
In the city-state of Bonvidaeo, by custom and law everyone must wear a mask and act in character with it, or face civil, social and religious penalties. Gregorius Bass is sent to Bonvidaeo as the Envoy of Calaria, mainly to get him out from underfoot. Masked as the Innocent Man, and in the company of his radical young Bonvidaoan servant, Bass stumbles into mystery, intrigue, heresy and murder.

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Smashwords book reviews by Mike Reeves-McMillan

  • The King's Sword on Feb. 02, 2014

    It's enjoyable, and even fresh, these days, to read a book in which the cynical, selfish opportunist is the antagonist, and the protagonist is a straightforwardly decent man. This is such a book. I very much enjoyed the first-person viewpoint character, an ex-soldier discharged after an injury who happens across a prince in distress. (That's a convenient coincidence, but it's the only one the plot relies on.) Kemen Sendoa is a big man from a dark-skinned ethnic minority, raised as a soldier as is the tradition with foundlings and orphans in his country. Women are scared of him. Men are wary of him. He'd really like to settle down and have a family, but that's not going to happen, he's pretty sure. He's lost friends, he's battered by injury (and becomes more battered as the story progresses), but he retains a powerful loyalty to his country and its people. His mentoring of the young prince is firm, but not harsh. When he's hailed as a hero for fighting off raiders, he's genuinely modest about it. He's not without his secret shame, though, and he does have a character arc as he confronts it. The prince is less fully rounded, but definitely has a lot of development in the course of the book, under Sendoa's guidance. Rather than giving us a training montage, the author spends considerable time on the process of his training, which I welcome as more realistic than the usual "Chosen One is whiny and won't put in the work, succeeds anyway when put under pressure" trope. I did occasionally feel that I was reading a geography textbook about the setting, and although it was relatively interesting and didn't go on and on, I did feel that the background information could have been incorporated into the narrative more smoothly or left out altogether. It wasn't quite what I would consider infodump, but it was headed in that direction. The language (apart from a few common errors which I will pass on to the author) was smooth and competent and didn't distract from the story. Overall, enjoyable. On my 0-9 subscale within the 4-star range, this scores a 3, but it shows enough potential that I'm anticipating a 5 from the sequel. The author gave me a review copy in expectation of an honest review.