Nancy Bandusky

Smashwords Interview

What motivated you to become an indie author?
I suffer from deep-seated control issues and the thought of someone drastically altering my stories makes me ill.
What is your writing process?
I have a general idea. For example, in Take A Stand, I had the idea of Christian persecution in the United States. Emma existed before any other characters and then Sean came along and took over the story. I'll see scenes in my head and I work to link them together. I have a general idea of how the story will go but all three that I've written so far (and the final one in the trilogy) have gone in different directions than originally planned.
Read more of this interview.

Where to find Nancy Bandusky online


Books

Run The Race
By
Series: The Challenge Trilogy, Book 2. Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 105,040. Language: English. Published: October 16, 2012. Category: Fiction » Christian » Suspense
(5.00 from 2 reviews)
Despite the hardships, the suffering and pain, and even the persecution, there is only one thing to do: Run the race.
Anniina Tatter - Not Just Cloth and Stuffing
By
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 5,040. Language: English. Published: September 23, 2012. Category: Fiction » Children’s books » Readers / Chapter Books
(4.75 from 4 reviews)
After an attempt to be helpful puts Anniina Tatter in danger of never finding her new family, she embarks on an adventure.
Take A Stand
By
Series: The Challenge Trilogy, Book 1. Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 106,550. Language: English. Published: January 4, 2012. Category: Fiction » Christian » Suspense
(4.00 from 5 reviews)
When the United States government outlaws Christianity there are three choices: obey, hide, or take a stand.

Nancy Bandusky’s tag cloud

anniina tatter    bandusky    chapter book    christian    doll    persecution    reader    short story    suspense    toys   

Smashwords book reviews by Nancy Bandusky

  • Promises - A Short Story on Feb. 16, 2013

    Interesting premise - poor execution. The grammatical errors (singular vs. plural, verb tenses, coordinating parallelism) start before the short story begins and continues through the "about the author" section at the end. All of this was distracting during the reading experience. The storyline is contrived with the use of too many character perspectives - including a bartender's two sentence thoughts - for such a short story. The "surprise" at the end is a cheat because of the multiple perspectives. In a short story (especially) every word is important. The reader is provided with far too much detail on the bar setting which is completely irrelevant to the plot. Descriptions of people are vague and actually non-existent for the main character - Julie. Elements are introduced (motel, train station) which the reader must just accept as they are never elaborated on. The details of the cover are hard to see as it is so dark.
  • The Eyes Have It on April 28, 2013

    A sweet love story that brings two people together from different levels of the economic ladder. While they think their only obstacle is her parents, their love is almost thwarted by a person on the sidelines. While there were external difficulties to their relationship surviving, the reader is also exposed to the internal conflicts that we all face - could the one I love really love me, baggage and all. One issue I had was that the reader is kept in the dark regarding what "hold" is over the parents to keep them in line. Also there is an abrupt pace increase toward the end of the story. Warning - there is minimal foul language and this is uttered by the "bad" people.
  • Masked Rider: Origins on June 06, 2013

    The Masked Rider: Origins is an enjoyable read for mystery readers who don't want the "dark" that is found in so many novels today. The humor, ample throughout, keeps the reader from taking anything too seriously and instead provides for a few hours break from the 21st century hassles. With one minor exception (see below under spoiler alert), this novel is family friendly with enjoyable squabbles between the family members. The novel centers around a tough, independent female rancher (the youngest child) who takes the reader through a number of events, numerous characters and a bit of unwanted love interest before sifting it all down to the mystery at hand. The twists and connections of seemingly unrelated facts makes for a solvable mystery and a fun read. A few areas did pull the reader from being immersed in the novel. One was that the Westin family is supposed to be on hard times, yet they eat what seems to be extravagant foods (due to their cook's preferences) for a family in the 1800s. Also a location was referred to repeatedly as the grotto that no one frequented. Since no one ever does frequent it except Holly, being told once was enough. **** Spoiler Alert **** While I consider the novel to be family friendly, some readers may take issue with the disturbance of a grave/corpse. This is brief and handled respectfully. There was one area that I felt cheated and that was when Holly caught one of the bad guys - Bernstein - the reader wasn't there. One minute Holly goes off to take care of something and the next time the reader "sees" her, she has him captured. The rest of the novel was good at "showing" the reader, but here the author didn't show and neither did she even tell.
  • From Hell on June 16, 2013

    This is a thought provoking novel which will have the reader reaching for his Bible before he is through. The story involves a man who dies by his own hand and ends up in hell. An angel rescues him and the two make stops along the way before reaching the man's true destination. The voyage to provide an opportunity for the man to "learn" gives the reader plenty of twists as fascinating topics are explored. Due to the many theological and debatable concepts presented (unforgivable sin, works vs. faith, 2nd chance after death, justification, and sanctification) it would prove beneficial to have a Bible within arm's reach. That said, this would be a good novel for a group to read and would easily lend itself to interesting discussions. The novel does have grammar errors and in some places necessary words are missing. This interferes with the reading experience as the reader is jolted out of the story, having to reread to get the author's intended meaning.
  • Past Forward Volume 1 on June 22, 2013

    This is a delightful novel exploring the new life of a young woman after the death of her mother. The interest is held because the young woman (and her mother) had been living as if it were the 1800s despite the story taking place in current time. Reading about their independent and simple way of life was an enjoyable and rewarding experience. The young woman is not one to worship the modern conveniences that save time for just time's sake, but rather is willing to work long and hard to complete a task no matter how daunting. While the woman appears to be coping with her loss and the changes to her life (men included), by the end of the novel things come to a head with no full resolution provided in this first volume.
  • Wandering Koala Saves Christmas on Oct. 18, 2013

    This is a message driven comic appropriate for all ages and all seasons but even more so as we move toward CHRISTMAS. The artwork is good - doing the job of showing the story. In the short comic, there is not much opportunity for background information about the characters (as a limited comic reader I find this a common frustration with comic books unless one has started from the beginning) but what is presented is enjoyable. I read the comic on a Nook Simple Touch - thus it was all in black and white. All the artwork shows up clear and is easy to distinguish the scene. On my Nook, there was a slight fading out of the words at times, but not completely and was thus still readable.
  • All My Money Says Is Bye-Bye on Nov. 16, 2013

    Take a bumbling private investigator wanna-be and an elderly lady that isn't as useless as society would lead us to believe, add in a hot-shot youngster (in comparison) and you have a team ready to track down the killer after a theft investigation balloons into multiple murders. The author cleverly uses first person perspective for both the detective rookie as well as the elderly woman at the "scene." This provides for some humorous moments when each mentally reflects on the other. They have interesting exchanges - although the telling (not showing) becomes a bit tiresome regarding the same mystery elements. The novel does delve into the guilt, anxiety, and tiresomeness of caring for the elderly. While this assists with understanding both lead characters, the concept goes on too long and slows the pace of the story. There is mild to moderate profanity throughout the novel.
  • The St Jude's Shuffle: A Tale Of Decision, Deceit & Dysentery on Feb. 13, 2014

    The short novel shows the inner workings of the selection of the next vicar of the Church of England. It is a fun read of the deceptions occurring in the hiring process. There are quite a few characters for such a short novel and the reader is not able to fully know any of them - that would require a longer book. Humor is a difficult subject and, depending on the reader's mood, some of what is present in the story might be acceptable or it might be slightly offensive. There are a few vulgarities. One issue this reader had with the story was that the opening scene is repeated later in the story in its entirety (too wasteful for a short story). Also, this is confusing as there is no indication as to when this event transpires - until the reader gets to the "repeat" scene in a later chapter.
  • God: The Interview on April 16, 2014

    This novel is written in the form of a television show transcript between the television host and God (or someone claiming to be God according to the host.) The story is this exchange and not much more. The man interviewing God is a confusing character. He states he is a heathen yet he is upset God didn't answer his prayers in the past. The main item that is quite apparent is his definite lack of belief regarding who he is interviewing, with no change at the end. With the opportunity of a lifetime - getting to interview God - most of the dialogue meanders around with the interviewer arguing his point and "God" evading a straight answer, refusing even to clarify his already clear statement of creation in Genesis chapter one. The god of this novel requires prayer in order to "beat" Satan which makes god appear to not be all-powerful. The concept that humans were created so the angels could decide which one is right - God or Satan - via a "contest" sets an unappealing tone. Who is really in control is questioned since a committee of angels (both good and bad) must be consulted before actions can be taken. Although the premise was interesting - an interview with God - it wasn't quite clear where the author was going with it. A range of topics were mentioned but with very limited follow through (an angel being evil incarnate, angels sinning and being forgiven, and Satan's ability to "wreck" God's work). All of these topics needed to be examined further. As it is they were just stated, leaving the reader wondering if the fiction contains any fact.
  • A Gift of Fire on June 20, 2014

    I received this novel for free in exchange for an honest review. This futuristic novel, set on a far-off planet, is engaging from the start. While the story starts in the present day of this "future," there are flashbacks to provide the reader with the history necessary to understand how and why things are as they are. There are several delightful characters which interrelate as the story progresses, allowing the reader to learn about the two different cultures. A good story provides enough information to enjoy while at the same time creating a little "spark" of desire for more ... this novel succeeds. However, there were too many minor characters (given names) which added to an already full cast to keep straight. Also, the author does make constant grammatical errors, but because of their consistency, once the reader "accepts" them, the errors do not distract from the story.