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Smashwords book reviews by ReadersEbooks

  • Teaching With Chopsticks: TEFL From The Frontline on Oct. 31, 2012
    (no rating)
    This book examines the sensations of being a foreigner in a strange culture, as well as many other things. It is sympathetic of the many differences between cultures, not gloating about the author’s ‘superiority’ at the same time as it describes how hard it is to break through from one culture to another. It is a must-read for anyone planning to change countries, and it is a book that can be enjoyed repeatedly. It is made for delving into, and for reading snippets out to friends, particularly foreign friends, or friends who are foreign in that land. I enjoyed every page, and I look forward keenly to Jonathan Last’s next book. I recommend it unreservedly.
  • The Downloading of Adrian Squire on Oct. 31, 2012

    ‘The Downloading of Adrian Squire’ is a rollicking tale of domestic bliss and conflict, with lots of action and emotion. It is easy to identify with most of the characters, and to empathize with them. The author has managed to portray real people in a very convincing, uncontrived way. The book is fast-moving and entertaining. I read until midnight, then carried on at four the next morning! It is enjoyable, engrossing, fun, and certainly worth reading. I have put Catherine Pearce on my list of authors to look out for.
  • Thin Ice on Oct. 31, 2012

    The story is gripping and the characters credible – I have known people just like these, and found it easy to relate to them. The ambiance is well-described, with an ability to put the reader into the scene. The book is certainly worth a read. The publisher describes the book as a psychological thriller, and that is certainly accurate. I think that this book will remain on my bookshelf for another read with a cup of hot chocolate some cold winter’s night.
  • Boom Town on Nov. 04, 2012

    I have lived in Africa, and reading this book brought to mind many of the characters who played such a role in the development of the continent, and, in some places, still do. It shows a good understanding of the foundations of the business society of Africa. The action is generally credible, and the main character, a normal man who is virtually forced by circumstances to become a scoundrel, is easy to identify with. This book left me with the desire to read more of the series.
  • The Friendship of Mortals on Nov. 08, 2012

    ‘The Friendship of Mortals’ took an unusually long time for me to read, because the language used, quite apart from the story, is a work of art in itself. On several occasions, I felt a need to read a particular sentence or paragraph to my associates and friends. On each of those occasions, the response was of profound admiration for the skill of Audrey Driscoll. This book is a work of art, a lesson in writing. It is a book that I will read over and over, simply for the pleasure that the use of the language gives me.
  • The Bodies Out Back on Nov. 16, 2012

    I really enjoyed this book. It is light reading, with a little moral overtone and some criticism of the society in which it is set, but all in comfortable proportions. It is a book that makes me want to read more by this author.
  • The Bodies Out Back on Nov. 16, 2012

    I really enjoyed this book. It is light reading, with a little moral overtone and some criticism of the society in which it is set, but all in comfortable proportions. It is a book that makes me want to read more by this author.
  • The Up-Country Man on Nov. 16, 2012

    The book tells of one of the most harrowing periods in modern Africa, setting out the characters and personalities that made Africa what it is. It gives the background to a political move that precipitated the greatest suffering Nigeria has known. Reviewer’s Comments: Reading this book gives one a good understanding of the real Africa. The descriptions of the people with whom the author came in contact are the good ‘salt of the earth’ people struggling to find their way through the confusion and the propaganda, the followers who leap on the bandwagon and ride with the wave of oppression to their own doom, the expatriates who are the mainstay of the economy and, at the same time, the whipping boys for the politicians seeking to drive up public sentiment for their own causes. If you desire to understand the reasons for why Africa has failed to take its place in the fellowship of nations, you must read this book
  • Tribal Gathering on Nov. 16, 2012

    I enjoyed each of the short stories in this compendium. The situations and characters are very real to those who have lived in Africa, and the stories allow the reader to understand many things in a new way, whether one is an African or an expatriate. The situations are clear expositions of ordinary events in Africa, not only of that time, but also now, and the handling of these situations is realistic and an accurate rendering of how things are. Reviewing this book has given me a desire to read all of Kenneth Ryeland’s works. I recommend this book to anyone who wants to learn more of the reasons why the situation in Africa is as it is, as well as to anyone who simply wants a good read.
  • You know all the Answers, but do you know the Questions? on Nov. 25, 2012

    A very useful book for a small business owner who wants to keep ahead of the herd. It is a 'how to' book on finding the little problems that grow into big ones. Well worth the price
  • Islands of the Gulf Volume 1, The Journey on Dec. 12, 2012

    The books that Audrey Driscoll crafts need no plot – they are excellent reading simply for the wonderful flow of her words, and the use of the language in which she is so skilled. The storyline adds to the enjoyment, with considerable imagination and a constant development, wrapping the reader into the lives of the characters. This book is a worthy successor to Audrey’s earlier book, ‘The Friendship of Mortals’.
  • The Mine on Dec. 16, 2012

    This book illustrates why the Dark Continent remains in poverty to a great extent. It shows the greed, tribalism, political manipulation, both internally and from abroad, that has characterized the African scene, and continues to do so. In many ways, the name of the country Nibana could easily be changed to Zimbabwe or South Africa! ‘The Mine’ is a book that will make the reader angry and annoyed, at the lost opportunities of the great powers in the way they managed their withdrawal from Africa, and at the unbridled greed of their political successors in African countries. Wish that it did not so accurately reflect the truth of Africa.
  • The Last Bature on Dec. 16, 2012

    The tone of the book is set in the dedication: ‘For the many subjugated people of Africa. In the hope that one day, they may be blessed with honest leaders.’ The author has a good understanding of the simplistic thinking used by many African politicians to gain control of the wealth of their nations. His descriptions explain why so much that happened in Africa when the colonial powers handed control of the fledgling countries to men whose only aim was to benefit themselves. If you wish to understand the mess that Africa became in the 1960s, you need to read this book.
  • Islands of the Gulf Volume 2, The Treasure on Dec. 30, 2012

    This book is written in a beautiful style, as all of Audrey Driscoll’s books. It is a gem. The story progresses through the book, with explanations to satisfy many of the unanswered questions from the previous books in the series, and raising other questions to be answered in the final book of the series, Hunting the Phoenix. We’re looking forward to reading that book. This book is strongly recommended for any one who reads for the pleasure that fine writing can bring.