Robin Lythgoe

Biography

Robin Lythgoe is an author of fantasy fiction. Reading and writing have always been a part of her life; before she mastered the art of the pen, she dictated her first written fiction to her scribe (a.k.a. her oldest sister). Her mother regularly took her on expeditions to the library, from which she invariably returned laden with a stack of books guaranteed to make her arms longer. She read everything voraciously, and when she finished her stack, she'd start on her mother's… and then her sisters'. Today she writes tales about wizards and magic, fantastical places and extraordinary journeys.

Where to find Robin Lythgoe online


Books

As the Crow Flies
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 158,420. Language: English. Published: December 10, 2012. Category: Fiction » Fantasy » Epic
(5.00)
For a thief, getting caught is never a good thing. Getting caught by a wizard is even worse. But when a man is coerced into stealing a nonexistent prize, threatened with his very life, and compelled to cooperate with his worst enemy—well, a man's got to do what he's told. Until, of course, he can think of a better plan.
Dragonlace
By
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 2,500. Language: English. Published: December 2, 2011. Category: Fiction » Fantasy » General
(4.50)
In this tongue-and-cheek tale an apprentice wizard must outwit a clever dragon in order to acquire the single strand of precious dragonlace she needs to pass the test set by her master.
In the Mirror (A Short Story)
By
Price: Free! Words: 2,810. Language: English. Published: July 18, 2011. Category: Fiction » Fantasy » General
(4.57)
A disillusioned author haunted by the disappearance of his father inherits a mirror and discovers that his own story can have an alternate ending.

Robin Lythgoe’s tag cloud

adventure    author    crow    dragon    fantasy    humor    magic    mirror    poison    quest    short story    thief    wizard    writer   

Robin Lythgoe's favorite authors on Smashwords


Smashwords book reviews by Robin Lythgoe

  • The Snow Owl on July 22, 2011

    I enjoyed the premise, but I think the story would have been better served by beginning in the second scene where the action actually begins and then letting the back story be revealed later. From the second scene, the tension builds up nicely - and then all the trouble literally melts away without any effort on the part of the characters. An otherwise enjoyable writing style is unfortunately marred by punctuation errors and dialectal use of the word 'anyways.' I think this story has a lot of potential and I would really like to see it get that polish.
  • Waif (A fantasy short story) on Aug. 02, 2011

    A thoroughly enjoyable and quick read, well-paced and well-plotted. The author's choice to forego names heightens the sense of sadness and inevitability of each character's position. Scenes and people are described so deftly that you can easily imagine the place, the atmosphere, the longing for something more from each of them.
  • Sanguis Dei on Aug. 11, 2011

    I read this story in its original (much shorter) version when Kris wrote it in response to a challenge for a writer's group. I liked it a lot then, but I have to say that it has 'grown up.' Nicely! Good descriptions, plenty of tension and a meaningful conclusion.
  • The Bedtime Story on Aug. 30, 2011

    What a cute little two-for-one story! On the one hand there are daddies and daughters, and on the other there are princesses and a dragon. Short and sweet and just right!
  • Guardian Demon on Dec. 17, 2012

    I like this pretty well, except that it feels more like a first chapter than an entire story. The first sentence quickly grabs the reader's attention, it's easy to sympathize with the main character, and there is a good build-up of possibility, yet the end doesn't quite deliver and we are left to make broad assumptions rather than experiencing an emotional response to the protagonist's predicament.