Gregory Rosenstock

Biography

Born in 1951, I teach for a living ( & write for a life!). Ran my own school in Dublin (Bluefeather School of Languages) for twenty-five years. Two other books appearing shortly with Smashwords.com, Who Cares (novel, 2008) and Be in Me (non-fiction, 2012), an investigation into the afterlife, written after the death of my wife, Marie-Claire, with whom I chat on the pendulum every day.
We have two amazing sons, Michael and Oliver.

Smashwords Interview

You say you chat with your deceased wife on the pendulum every day. What's that all about?
I stumbled upon pendulum communication with the deceased over thirty years years ago when I dabbled with the medical concept of self-diagnosis using a pendulum. Although the information I received was extraordinary and compelling (I've included it in my novel Who Cares, 2008), I rejected it and refused to accept the idea that there were spirits floating about and communicating with the living. The whole thing made no sense at all, particularly as the information received was either cryptic, vague, ambivalent, incoherent or just downright wrong. And, of course, always unverifiable. I had been an atheist since I was a student, but was a big fan of Zen and the Tao; even if one's individual consciousness or personal life energy continued to exist for some period after death, the duality and the simplistic fantasy of floating or wandering souls was childish nonsense which had nothing to do with Zen or the Tao.
So?
So why do I say I do it now? Because I discovered that the whole thing was true, after all. The quality of the message depends on the quality of the medium. Since Marie-Claire's death in 2007, I have been fine-tuning my radio-dial as a medium; that's why it's so easy for me now. As regards the earlier criticisms I've mentioned, I can actually explain it all now, all the incoherence, the weirdness, the ambivalence, the lack of verification. Understandably, as a three-dimensional being confined to a space-time continuum, I reach a point beyond which there is no possible way of seeing the big picture; our understanding is obviously extremely limited, especially if we approach it from a rational perspective. Indeed, for any deeper understanding, you have to go way beyond that.
Read more of this interview.

Where to find Gregory Rosenstock online


Books

Be In Me Q&A
By
Price: Free! Words: 13,170. Language: English. Published: January 5, 2014. Category: Nonfiction » Inspiration » Spiritual inspiration
Be in Me Q & A is an introduction to the author's book about life, death and the afterlife, Be In Me. The booklet is an extended interview with the author and is free of charge.
Be In Me
By
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 68,490. Language: English. Published: November 26, 2013. Category: Nonfiction » Religion and Spirituality » Spiritual awakening
Be In Me is about a man who succeeded in contacting his deceased wife using a pendulum. The profoundly life-changing conversations with his wife inspired him to research the existence of life after death and the meaning of our lives.
Who Cares
By
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 75,100. Language: English. Published: October 2, 2013. Category: Fiction » Literature » Literary
Oscar Jacobs is a young college dropout who works as an orderly at a home for the disabled. Shocked by its dysfunctional environment and unbalanced staff-members, he examines the meaning of caring, the meaning of life and the meaning of death. A dark undercurrent of menace propels the story towards a collision course leading to a shocking conclusion.
Lazarus
By
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 72,040. Language: English. Published: September 20, 2013. Category: Fiction » Literature » Literary
Luke Collins is a schoolteacher, failed inventor and atheist, who raises his son from the dead. His celebrity status is short-lived, however, when an incident from his past is revealed in the media. He flees to a Greek island from which he is eventually deported. When he returns, he discovers that his son has a new identity, precipitating in Collins, albeit too late, a life-changing revelation.

Gregory Rosenstock’s tag cloud

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