Corbitt Nesta

Biography

Corbitt Nesta's short stories have appeared on Eclectica.com, East of the Web.com, Dead Mule.com and From the Asylum.com,and in Lunch Hour Stories, her articles on Italy in Transitions Abroad, and on Suite101.com.

Books

The Podestà's Brooch
By
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 3,470. Language: English. Published: February 22, 2012. Category: Fiction » Women's fiction » General
Yes, sociopaths exist and exult in wreaking havoc on other people’s lives. Watch Konnie, domestic help-cum-wife in a wealthy, dysfunctional Italian family. On impulse, she steals a family heirloom, and then…
The Gray Stag and The White Lady
By
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 4,720. Language: English. Published: February 16, 2012. Category: Fiction » Fantasy » Short stories
Luigi Beltani,consummate Italian chef, has finally realized his dream: his own gourmet restaurant in his hometown, Padernello, near Cremona, Italy. Despite resistance from his wife and mother-in-law, the restaurant is a success...until ‘presences’ from Padernello’s thousand-year past begin to visit,threatening both the restaurant’s existence and Luigi’s sanity.

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Smashwords book reviews by Corbitt Nesta

  • A Return to Sanditon on March 07, 2011

    Sanditon was Jane Austen's last novel, and in fact was never completed. Begun just a few months before her death, the novel stops after only a few short chapters. Almost two hundred years later, Anne Toledo has undertaken completing the novel in the inimitable Austen style. Toledo is not the first to take Austen's setting, her characters and plot and continue them to the logical Austen conclusion. Her `completion' is however the best of the several published in the last 50 years. Toledo has done a magnificent job. After the first few lines of the `new' chapters, the reader feels she is in good hands, the hands of a master novelist, as if she were truly reading the last of Jane Austen's novels. The style, the almost mathematically balanced quality of the sentence construction, the cadence of the dialogue, the character development, the setting and the ins and outs of the plot ARE Jane Austen. The setting, as in Austen's later novels, is all important. Sanditon is an English sea resort in the planning and early construction stage. The characters are all in one way or another concerned with making the place successful. Interwoven with this commercial interest, very well researched and seamlessly presented, are the love stories, family conflicts and descriptions of the changing social fabric in England in the early 19th century. Toledo's novel, exactly like all of Jane Austen's complete ones, can be read on many levels. And it's a fascinating read. We recommend it to all Jane Austen fans.
  • The Perfect Wave, a short story on April 17, 2012
    (no rating)
    Here’s a short cautionary tale with an atmosphere and characters reminiscent of Somerset Maugham’s expat/steamy island stories. Though the tale gets off to a slowish start, we’re soon introduced to the two perfectly balanced main characters. Matthew is a part of his environment, generous, energetic, sensitive. Jack, just the opposite, is a surfer, a teacher who gave up, a wanderer, a barfly and a drunk. Irascible on the surface, Jack wants to tell his story, and it is, as we guessed, a sad one. The author’s juxtaposition of Matthew and Jack is masterful, though in this very short story, there are other characters, just as economically drawn. The narrator, as melancholic as her Thomas Hardy novel, mirrors the mood of the claustrophobic bar and Jack’s quest for the perfect wave, and for his dead wife. The tropical storm, itself a character, passes over the island. The narrator takes heed. Paris Franz is a young writer whose future is assured. We’ll look forward to her novel.
  • The Perfect Wave, a short story on April 17, 2012

    Here’s a short cautionary tale with an atmosphere and characters reminiscent of Somerset Maugham’s expat/steamy island stories. Though the tale gets off to a slowish start, we’re soon introduced to the two perfectly balanced main characters. Matthew is a part of his environment, generous, energetic, sensitive. Jack, just the opposite, is a surfer, a teacher who gave up, a wanderer, a barfly and a drunk. Irascible on the surface, Jack wants to tell his story, and it is, as we guessed, a sad one. The author’s juxtaposition of Matthew and Jack is masterful, though in this very short story, there are other characters, just as economically drawn. The narrator, as melancholic as her Thomas Hardy novel, mirrors the mood of the claustrophobic bar and Jack’s quest for the perfect wave, and for his dead wife. The tropical storm, itself a character, passes over the island. The narrator takes heed. Paris Franz is a young writer whose future is assured. We’ll look forward to her novel.