Candy Beauchamp

Biography

I own a bookkeeping firm (no, really) and balance that with a lot of reading and reviewing for fun.

Where to find Candy Beauchamp online


Books

This member has not published any books.

Candy Beauchamp's favorite authors on Smashwords


Smashwords book reviews by Candy Beauchamp

  • Trevor's Song on Aug. 15, 2010

    I was first introduced to Trevor Wolff a few years back. It didn't take long for me to swoon and dedicated myself to full Trevor Groupie status. He's so dreamy and so hot. I mean, hello! He's Trevor Wolff! So you may be asking yourself, who exactly Trevor Wolff is... Trevor is the brainchild of a friend of mine, Susan H Gottfried. He's the bassist for the hottest fictional rock band in history, Shapeshifter, and he's a bad bad bad boy. And well, that, makes my blood boil very nicely indeed. Susan has had an interesting marketing idea behind her book. She started a blog called the Meet and Greet where we got to know Trevor and his band mates a bit, read some outtakes and swoon over the Wolff hotness. She then took those blog posts together, gave us an intro to each one and released the Demo Tapes 1 and Demo Tapes 2. It took a LONG time (not that I'm bitter) but we finally, at last, have Trevor's Song. Was it worth the wait? Oh, heck yeah! What a just plain fun read. It will take you back to the early 80s-90s. And for those of you sitting there shaking your head, you know you got your Poison on back in the day! Susan takes us for a wild ride through the world of Shapeshifter, making us laugh so hard we cry and learning things about Trevor and his band mates along the way. It's a wild ride, so you want to hang on tight! It's not all fun, there are a few serious things going on that keep the story moving forward to a climax that left me wanting to hang the author from the nearest clothesline and beat her with a wooden broom until she spilled! The ending will leave you wanting more. I really like my stories to have a very definitive ending. I like to see it all wrapped up in a pretty blue bow and she used a pink one. So, it had an ending, but not 100% complete. The dialogue is very well done in the book, the characters are believable and the writing is really wonderful. I had a few timeline issues and felt like the story jumped a few times and I missed it, but that I'm chalking that up to the fact that I knew so much about them and their lives beforehand. I've spent 4 years with them, after all. It doesn't seem to be an issue with other reviewers. I mention it just in case others had the issue. This is a definite must-read for anyone that had a thing for hair bands and just really needs a good fun read. Congrats, Susan!
  • Snow Burn on Sep. 16, 2010

    I enjoyed this one as far as the plot goes. It's a bit of a warning tale for teenagers to listen to their parents (or maybe that's how I read it because I'm a parent - not of a teenager yet, oh my!). I think you know the outcome, but not how we get there, which was quite a fun ride. This young adult short story's plot is well thought-out. I think this would be a great book for a fourteen to seventeen year old boy. I'm actually amazed that more books aren't written specifically for boys in that age group so I was excited to see and review this one. I can see a young man enjoying the plot points and following along with Vince and Tommy as they get themselves into deeper and deeper trouble. I felt the writing itself was decently realistic. There were a few minor issues for me. I thought the dialogue could be a bit stilted. I sometimes felt like the back and forth exchange of words weren't following each other - it seemed as though they were speaking separately but at the same time, if that makes sense. I didn't feel like they were responding to the conversation. My other problem was the editing of the chapter breaks. They seemed extremely random and out of place in many instances. A good editor could have cleaned that up a bit for the author. I will say that I really enjoyed the "what if" scenarios that the author presented us with sprinkled throughout the text. It did make me think and want to keep reading to find out what was going to happen next. I also really enjoyed the character of Vince and I found myself really wanting to know more about him. I would love it if the author were to give us some more short stories - or perhaps a full-length novel with this character in it. Overall, worth a read for teenage boys or people who enjoy a good YA novel for boys.
  • Cattitude on Oct. 05, 2010

    What a silly, stupid, and pointless book. ... And I actually stayed up late reading that drivel because I could not put it down. Seriously, this was a lot of fun! It was very silly and pretty darn pointless, but let's be real... it's a book about this cat who swaps bodies with a lady, both of which who have murderous crazy people after them. What I liked most about this book is that it didn't pretend to be anything more than what it is - just a cute little fun break from reality. There was no trying to explain how it happened or how it could be undone or anything like that. It just was. Silly. Sassy. While I found the character of Sorcha to be a little annoying and a bit whiny but uh, well, she did get turned into a cat. However, Belle made me want to stab my eyes out with a spoon at times. The neediness and stuck-up-ed-ness really got on my nerves. Yeah, she likes tuna. Move on. Having said that, I also really loved the characters. Yes, that leaves me quite confused. They were very much "love to hate" type of characters. The author's writing was fantastic, I didn't feel bored or felt like it went on too long at any given point in the book. I also loved that I didn't see any glaring errors (yes, yes, yes, I know, silly pet peeve). Overall, this was a breath of fresh air. There is absolutely no way I would have picked this book up on my own had the author not contacted me and asked me to review it. In fact, this actually went in my secondary "probably not going to bother reading" pile for reviews. I guess it just goes to show that it's always worth a second look. I simply grabbed this one because I knew it would be light and I could easily put it down. Yeah, not so much. Sucked me in a bit. It still was easy to put down, but it was interesting enough to get me to pick it back up when I sat down to read again. This book is recommended to people that don't take their literature too seriously. It's reading. It should be downright fun sometimes.
  • Let's Do Lunch on Oct. 09, 2010

    This was an interesting book for me and I'm still a little conflicted on what I think about it. On one hand, it was a great story, great plot, etc. I liked that the author did a fabulous job of making the food and farm become a character in the story. I did not, however, like that it got a little preachy a few times about organic and farming. I really think it took away from the story in many ways. As with another book I read recently, without giving spoilers, there's a certain element of the story that I thought there was a big red arrow pointing to it as far as the "mystery". It's another of those things of does the author give me too much info or not enough so I don't see it coming AT ALL? Either one and I'm not happy right? *laugh* Poor authors can't win! The author's writing style is really very good, as I mentioned, she did a great job of making the farming and food a true character in the book, but she also made me feel like I was sitting in the restaurant and watching it all go down, she really does do a great job of pulling you into the story. I loved that. I'm rating this 4 stars, but it's more 3.5 because I also felt like the book has a bit of an identity crisis. Not only did we have the organic rants, but in some ways it wanted to be a true romance and chicklit book, but also a bit of a mystery. I'm not saying that a book can't be both, but you have to commit to it and I don't feel like the characters really committed to either. This would be a great read when you are looking for a light and fun book. In spite of my comments above, I did really enjoy it and really identified with main character in many ways.
  • Calico Pennants on Oct. 09, 2010

    I looked at the cover to this book and then read the description and then put it away. I recently pulled it back out and decided to give it a go. Honestly? I thought I'd get through the first chapter or two and toss it. Man, I read it nearly one sitting! This was absolutely fabulous! It's more of a historical fiction, but there are two parallel stories going and they meet... I can't say more without giving it away, but I hope the author will rewrite the description as it doesn't do it justice at all! The writing jumps off the page, I was in that cockpit, driving that plane. I even got a little queasy. No really. Okay, maybe not. But I was totally driving the boat and following along with all of the characters. What a fabulous talent this guy has. At one point I even gasped out loud. Honestly, this is some of the best "in the moment" writing I've read in a very long time. I lived in Hawaii for several years and this brought back so many of the sights, sounds and smells. Either the author has been there or he's done some serious research into it, which really makes me appreciate his writing even more. I also get the feeling he's done a lot of research on Earhart as well, he had to have - either that or he has be totally snowed, because I'd swear I was reading a really good biography in some parts. This is a great book for people who like the story of Amelia Earhart or just like a really good action book. I want to say more, but I can't without spoiling it for you... just read it. Trust me.
  • October Breezes on Oct. 09, 2010

    While I admit that the first half of the book moves pretty slow, now that I’m 85% in, I can see that it was necessary to get the character development needed for a novel of this depth. This book is on the serious side, dealing with teen dating, rape and pregnancy and has some hot button issues, but the writing and the realism that the author manages to capture makes it mesmerizing to read. I cannot put it down now that I’m at a critical point in the story. But therein lies the problem with this novel. It's pretty serious stuff and I really wanted the author to give us more information about the aftermath and healing. I think those elements would have been much more important than the long set up. Yes, we needed that too, but it still could have been trimmed by 1/3 in the front part of this book and still been very well done. It wrapped up entirely too fast for me. I needed more, not too much more, but just enough so I would feel good about how Skye's life turned out. There were a few grammar/spelling errors, but nothing a good content editor couldn't help with. I dunno. I'm really torn on this one because had it not be for how well the author presented this hard subject matter, I would give it 3 stars, but I'm going to leave it at 4 because this is a TOUGH one to tackle in the YA market and she handled it beautifully. The characters were realistic, compassionate and well-rounded. I just hope she continues to write and maybe makes sure her next book goes through a top notch editor. I would recommend this to high school students. I think the message is one that is important. HOWEVER, I would urge parents to read this one first to make sure their child can handle the subject matter. Only you know your kid, right?
  • Waiter, There's a Clue in My Soup! Five Short Mysteries on Oct. 10, 2010

    The title story is definitely the best of the bunch in this collection of short stories and sample chapters of another book of the author's. It was cute, BUT from the title, I was envisioning a little more of the cozy mystery sleuth-type genre. Not a bad little short story collection, but not what I was expecting. The other stories are well-done and edited. I read the sample chapters as well and I might look into the book, but it's not really my cup of usual tea, but I did add it to my list to think about! I like short stories, but sometimes I feel like I'm just getting into the author's rhythm when the story ends so I'm willing to give her work another shot for sure. This is recommended for people that like light Westerns, I think, with a little bit of humor on top.
  • The Song of Ballad and Crescendo on Oct. 10, 2010

    I read this towards the end of the 24-hour read-a-thon I did and all I could think was "Dude, pass me those funny brownies". This is a little tiny bit out there for me, it's written very... and I'm looking for the right word here... airy, perhaps? It is VERY short and comes with a sample of his novel as well. I read that as well, it looks interesting, I plan to look at his book again before deciding if I want to read it or not. BUT this particular short story is a sweet little love story, it almost feel like a mythological story. The photography is absolutely stunning. I had to load it into my PC so I could fully appreciate the photos. Just gorgeous. Well worth a quick read (like 30 minutes, tops) for someone that likes mythology or just something a little different. Funny brownies not included.
  • The Summoning Fire on Nov. 12, 2010

    I really enjoy a good horror book; not much gets me freaked out when it comes to horror. Add in the fact that Hell has, literally, exploded upon the Earth and this book really kept me interested. The opening to this book is absolutely wonderful and I really wanted to know what in Hell was going on. It kept me guessing quite a bit. The start and end of this book keep you completely riveted. I absolutely loved the premise of Hell on Earth erupting and it becoming a type of tourist attraction of a sort. The writing itself was really well done, I was lulled in by parts of the story. The author does a bang up job setting the stage and bringing this world into existence for us. Absolutely excellent. I've read plenty of books with a similar format, the switching back and forth of time lines. I'm not sure that this format completely worked for this particular book, I got lost in the time line a few times and had to backtrack. I think this could have been better handled with more of a flashback or just straight time line. There were also some scenes that I thought could have been cut, they were a little over the top as far as brutality for what this book was. Having said that, it's worth a read for true horror fans who are looking for something different in this genre.
  • ShapeShifter: The Demo Tapes (Year 2) on Nov. 15, 2010

    I first ran into ShapeShifter, the fictional band, three or 4 years ago at a blog called The Meet & Greet. It was a cute blog by a writer and she was telling us little side stories as well as some times outtakes from her writing that didn't make the cut. It was fun, allowing us to glimpse into the characters of the book she was writing as well as watch these kids grow up from friends, to garage band to super duper famous and all that trappings that come along with that. The book she was writing was Trevor's Song - and one day soon I'm told we'll get to read that book! Yay! In the meantime the author, Susan, has released a couple of small books. They are compilations from the best of the best of the blog postings. This is the second of such books. It was neat to have them all set down in one place and even neater that she gave a little intro to each one telling us how it came about. It's great fun to follow a band (and their screaming, sometimes shirtless, fans) through her writing and writing style. I'm kind of a Trevor groupie and I can't wait for the finished product, but... even if you just read this book, you'll be happy with it. It's like little mini short stories while making of a rock band. Give it a shot!
  • Dementia Diary, A Caregiver's Journal on Dec. 02, 2010

    I think it's safe bet that most people have been touched by some form of dementia, whether it's a parent, a grand parent or a friend. I'm no different. My grandmother suffered with Alzheimer's and it was painful to watch, not only her, but also my mother and her siblings. Dealing with someone with dementia is a whole other ball of wax. It's been over a decade, but reading this book brought back a lot of that time and remembering how helpless I felt to do something for my mother. It also brought back some smiles, remembering all of the "crazy" things that my grandmother did. It truly is a laugh or cry situation when you have someone you love with dementia. My husband's grandmother currently suffers with a form of dementia as well. Okay, so that's where I'm coming from when I read this book... I really applaud the author for this honesty, I felt that he not only gave his mother the honor of telling her truth, but also allowed himself to let go of some of the guilt he was (is?) carrying around. I think that's the prevailing feeling with all caregivers though and I would be shocked if he didn't have that undertone. I also liked when he gave us a glimpse into the day-to-day drama (and there's always drama!) of dealing with his mother, her caregivers, and her supporters. It truly felt like he had a second job. I read a lot of memoirs (it's my favorite genre) and what I think this book is missing most is that the author didn't give us enough information about HIM. This is an odd combination of a memoir and biography, almost. I wanted to know about him. I wanted him to open up and I wanted to know how he was feeling. Yes, I cared about what he was doing, but I think this book really is missing the emotional element. It was very "action" and not enough "feeling", I guess. With dementia, there are a LOT of feelings. There were a few times he opened up and I think those little glimpses really made me realize that we needed more from him. Either way, my heart goes out to the author. My mother had her children and several siblings to lean on. It must be just that much more difficult dealing with this alone. Although the author provided me a copy of this book for review at no cost, I did purchase it to share with a few family members that I think would benefit from it. I recommend this book for those that have been touched by someone with any of the various forms of dementia. It will remind you that you are not alone and just how prevalent this problem can be.
  • We Interrupt This Date on Dec. 05, 2010

    Sometimes you really need an escape book, mine are fluffy books and southern fiction. I grew up in the Charleston area of South Carolina and sometimes I need a little taste of home. Southern fiction comes in two genres. Good and really really bad. There is no in-between, I fear. I must admit that had the author not supplied this book for me to review, I might not have picked it up. The cover is pretty uninspired (with apologies to the cover artist) and I will admit I do judge books by their cover. I'm glad that, based on the description, I gave it a try. Such a touching book and a great book about finding yourself in the middle of your life and deciding what really matters. I loved that it had plenty of funny moments, a little bit of a romance, but the main theme was about a strong woman, who was growing stronger. I found myself identifying a bit with the man character, being the person that everyone contacts when they need help, running in twenty different directions and going nowhere fast. Okay, so the main character was a little older than I am, but it still struck home a bit. My favorite part is that the author let Charleston be Charleston. There was no romanticizing it. The vernacular wasn't completely destroyed. I didn't feel like reaching through the author's typewriter and whacking her right upside her pretty little head. This is a bad habit that some southern fiction writers fall into and it drives me completely crazy. It was very well edited and the plot moved along. The introduction of the ghost tours and giving us background on that was genius of the author, it brought another element into the story without burying us in the details. Sweetly written with heart. Recommended for those looking for a light read or those like southern fiction.
  • ShapeShifter: The Demo Tapes: Year 3 on June 20, 2011

    I'll be the first to admit that I'm a big fan of this series of books. I've been following this author for a while - heck, before she even had books, I was a fan of her online work. It should be no surprise that I loved this series. I read most of the entries a couple of years ago when they were first online, but I love that she's taken them, given us some background, edited them and put them together in a cohesive collection. The basics are that she writes about the birth and success of a rock band. Trevor (*swoon*), the lead singer and Mitchell, the guitar guy are the main characters. The depth of the characters always impresses me. Susan doesn't write, she creates. She has created some beautiful deep characters in a light and funny way that makes it so that I don't even really realize how much I know about them. The stories themselves... well, they are what we've learned to expect from Susan. Fun, light, deep, intriguing and everything in between. I highly recommend this series to those that enjoy a fun read and to those of us that still carry around a little bit of the 80s and 90s in our hearts.
  • Atticus for the Undead on Nov. 20, 2011

    In "Atticus for the Undead" John Abramowitz has created a world that sings of the past, of the present, and of an alternate future. The story takes place in Austin, Texas amid racial tensions, political wrangling, a murder trial, and an organization's bid to use all of these situations to push their own agenda. Fifteen years prior to our story, an unexplained event unleashes a change upon the world. Creatures once only found in myth and folklore are once again unleashed, this time for real. How would you react if your neighbor suddenly gained magical powers? What if the kindly old lady down the street transformed once a month into a man-eating werewolf? These and other creatures, including vampires and zombies, are now a part of everyday life. These once normal citizens have joined a new racial class: The Arcane (or for the racially biased, the "Supernatural"). Enter stage right: Hunter Gamble. Hunter is a new type of lawyer with old fashion sensibilities. Following on his father's footsteps, Hunter became a lawyer. But where his father formed a huge law firm, Hunter followed his heart after reading "To Kill a Mockingbird". His entire focus is the rights of the Arcane. He is only human though, and his small law office does what it can. Enter stage left: Sam Pollard. Sam is a young man whose only mistake was to die. Raised from the dead by his mage father, Sam becomes the focus for a legal battle that will affect the standing of the Arcane for many years to come. Bring up the lights: An ominous figure hangs in the background. Adrian Vorr, leader of the Austin chapter of the Salvation Alliance, wants nothing more than to see Hunter out of the way. The Salvation Alliance will go to any length to make this happen. The author describes the book as "Legal Fiction". I do not doubt that in many ways "Atticus for the Undead" falls in this category. However, I can think of several others that it would fit in as well. In truth, this is a cross-genre story that will appeal to many readers. There is drama, humor, action, magic, and of course, "Legal Fiction" as well. Mr. Abramowitz has crafted a great story with very believable characters. Though the story is set in a slightly future time with mages, vampires, zombies and other Arcane, the situation is something you could see in any setting where racial tensions are high. This story serves as a reminder, a reminder that even when all are created equal, someone will always try to use fear to remove that equality and use the tension in their favor. Every character is well developed. You can feel the tension as Hunter pushes through a crowd of angry Salvation Alliance members. The hatred and menace of Vorr against the Arcane is palpable in every scene he is in. Sam is a likable guy, a good son, and pitiable as a zombie. You will want everything to work out. You will cringe with each plot twist. You will smile as things go the characters way, and mourn when they don't. "Atticus for the Undead" is in many ways and echo of "To Kill a Mockingbird", updated for our times and made more attainable to the masses. However, there are many differences and is actually in many ways a more believable (sans Arcane) story. This is especially true of the ending, which I felt came way too soon. I wanted more from, and for, each of the main characters of the story. However, looking back, I can understand Mr. Abramowitz's decisions. Rainbows do not lead to pots of gold, clouds do not have silver linings, and each and every one of use, Arcane and Natural, are all too human. As Harper Lee's Scout told us in "To Kill a Mockingbird": "I think there's just one kind of folks. Folks." I think this important moral rings through every page of "Atticus to the Undead." I am rating this book with 4 stars, but a very highly regarded 4 stars. While not the best book I have ever read, "Atticus for the Undead" was one of the most engaging. Whether you are a fan of legal, sci-fi, fantasy, or supernatural fiction I think there is something here for everyone.
  • Atticus for the Undead on Nov. 20, 2011

    In "Atticus for the Undead" John Abramowitz has created a world that sings of the past, of the present, and of an alternate future. The story takes place in Austin, Texas amid racial tensions, political wrangling, a murder trial, and an organization's bid to use all of these situations to push their own agenda. Fifteen years prior to our story, an unexplained event unleashes a change upon the world. Creatures once only found in myth and folklore are once again unleashed, this time for real. How would you react if your neighbor suddenly gained magical powers? What if the kindly old lady down the street transformed once a month into a man-eating werewolf? These and other creatures, including vampires and zombies, are now a part of everyday life. These once normal citizens have joined a new racial class: The Arcane (or for the racially biased, the "Supernatural"). Enter stage right: Hunter Gamble. Hunter is a new type of lawyer with old fashion sensibilities. Following on his father's footsteps, Hunter became a lawyer. But where his father formed a huge law firm, Hunter followed his heart after reading "To Kill a Mockingbird". His entire focus is the rights of the Arcane. He is only human though, and his small law office does what it can. Enter stage left: Sam Pollard. Sam is a young man whose only mistake was to die. Raised from the dead by his mage father, Sam becomes the focus for a legal battle that will affect the standing of the Arcane for many years to come. Bring up the lights: An ominous figure hangs in the background. Adrian Vorr, leader of the Austin chapter of the Salvation Alliance, wants nothing more than to see Hunter out of the way. The Salvation Alliance will go to any length to make this happen. The author describes the book as "Legal Fiction". I do not doubt that in many ways "Atticus for the Undead" falls in this category. However, I can think of several others that it would fit in as well. In truth, this is a cross-genre story that will appeal to many readers. There is drama, humor, action, magic, and of course, "Legal Fiction" as well. Mr. Abramowitz has crafted a great story with very believable characters. Though the story is set in a slightly future time with mages, vampires, zombies and other Arcane, the situation is something you could see in any setting where racial tensions are high. This story serves as a reminder, a reminder that even when all are created equal, someone will always try to use fear to remove that equality and use the tension in their favor. Every character is well developed. You can feel the tension as Hunter pushes through a crowd of angry Salvation Alliance members. The hatred and menace of Vorr against the Arcane is palpable in every scene he is in. Sam is a likable guy, a good son, and pitiable as a zombie. You will want everything to work out. You will cringe with each plot twist. You will smile as things go the characters way, and mourn when they don't. "Atticus for the Undead" is in many ways and echo of "To Kill a Mockingbird", updated for our times and made more attainable to the masses. However, there are many differences and is actually in many ways a more believable (sans Arcane) story. This is especially true of the ending, which I felt came way too soon. I wanted more from, and for, each of the main characters of the story. However, looking back, I can understand Mr. Abramowitz's decisions. Rainbows do not lead to pots of gold, clouds do not have silver linings, and each and every one of use, Arcane and Natural, are all too human. As Harper Lee's Scout told us in "To Kill a Mockingbird": "I think there's just one kind of folks. Folks." I think this important moral rings through every page of "Atticus to the Undead." I am rating this book with 4 stars, but a very highly regarded 4 stars. While not the best book I have ever read, "Atticus for the Undead" was one of the most engaging. Whether you are a fan of legal, sci-fi, fantasy, or supernatural fiction I think there is something here for everyone.
  • Atticus for the Undead on Nov. 20, 2011

    In "Atticus for the Undead" John Abramowitz has created a world that sings of the past, of the present, and of an alternate future. The story takes place in Austin, Texas amid racial tensions, political wrangling, a murder trial, and an organization's bid to use all of these situations to push their own agenda. Fifteen years prior to our story, an unexplained event unleashes a change upon the world. Creatures once only found in myth and folklore are once again unleashed, this time for real. How would you react if your neighbor suddenly gained magical powers? What if the kindly old lady down the street transformed once a month into a man-eating werewolf? These and other creatures, including vampires and zombies, are now a part of everyday life. These once normal citizens have joined a new racial class: The Arcane (or for the racially biased, the "Supernatural"). Enter stage right: Hunter Gamble. Hunter is a new type of lawyer with old fashion sensibilities. Following on his father's footsteps, Hunter became a lawyer. But where his father formed a huge law firm, Hunter followed his heart after reading "To Kill a Mockingbird". His entire focus is the rights of the Arcane. He is only human though, and his small law office does what it can. Enter stage left: Sam Pollard. Sam is a young man whose only mistake was to die. Raised from the dead by his mage father, Sam becomes the focus for a legal battle that will affect the standing of the Arcane for many years to come. Bring up the lights: An ominous figure hangs in the background. Adrian Vorr, leader of the Austin chapter of the Salvation Alliance, wants nothing more than to see Hunter out of the way. The Salvation Alliance will go to any length to make this happen. The author describes the book as "Legal Fiction". I do not doubt that in many ways "Atticus for the Undead" falls in this category. However, I can think of several others that it would fit in as well. In truth, this is a cross-genre story that will appeal to many readers. There is drama, humor, action, magic, and of course, "Legal Fiction" as well. Mr. Abramowitz has crafted a great story with very believable characters. Though the story is set in a slightly future time with mages, vampires, zombies and other Arcane, the situation is something you could see in any setting where racial tensions are high. This story serves as a reminder, a reminder that even when all are created equal, someone will always try to use fear to remove that equality and use the tension in their favor. Every character is well developed. You can feel the tension as Hunter pushes through a crowd of angry Salvation Alliance members. The hatred and menace of Vorr against the Arcane is palpable in every scene he is in. Sam is a likable guy, a good son, and pitiable as a zombie. You will want everything to work out. You will cringe with each plot twist. You will smile as things go the characters way, and mourn when they don't. "Atticus for the Undead" is in many ways and echo of "To Kill a Mockingbird", updated for our times and made more attainable to the masses. However, there are many differences and is actually in many ways a more believable (sans Arcane) story. This is especially true of the ending, which I felt came way too soon. I wanted more from, and for, each of the main characters of the story. However, looking back, I can understand Mr. Abramowitz's decisions. Rainbows do not lead to pots of gold, clouds do not have silver linings, and each and every one of use, Arcane and Natural, are all too human. As Harper Lee's Scout told us in "To Kill a Mockingbird": "I think there's just one kind of folks. Folks." I think this important moral rings through every page of "Atticus to the Undead." I am rating this book with 4 stars, but a very highly regarded 4 stars. While not the best book I have ever read, "Atticus for the Undead" was one of the most engaging. Whether you are a fan of legal, sci-fi, fantasy, or supernatural fiction I think there is something here for everyone.
  • King Trevor on July 08, 2012

    I'm a big fan of the author, Susan, and her work. I've been a little bit of a fan girl of Trevors since before the books even existed and there was just a little blog. I wasn't sure where Susan was going after her first book, [[ASIN:B004C445Z6 Trevor's Song]], but was willing to go along for the ride. I ended up being shocked how much Trevor has grown as a person and as a character. Oh, he's still a grade A butthead, but there were moments that we got to see the real him that made me smile. I'm not sure that Trevor could ever totally lose his attitude as that would just be unrealistic. However, Trevor is almost a secondary character in this book. This books really is about Keri and family relationships. About the elephant in the room that sits there and stares at you while smiling politely at family functions. I have always liked Keri, but my love and appreciation for her, who she is and what she does grew tremendously with this one. This second book of the series also gave us a larger insight into Mitchell and how much he's willing to do for her. I found Keri's brother, Stevie, however to be one of the single most annoying characters, however. I'm sure he was written that way, but I found myself unable to connect with him and just wanted to punch him. For as much success as he has had, he sure is a whiny spineless sniveling idiot of a man. He was somewhat redeemed, but he'll need some work for me to not hate him. *laughing* What I enjoy most about Susan's work with Shapeshifter is that it brings me back to my teenage years. The days of hair bands, screeching metal music and hiding in my room from my parents, who just didn't understand. Recommended for children of the 80's and 90's. Read her first book first though, I think you really do need the background before diving into this one.
  • A Ghostly Christmas Present on July 18, 2012

    I grabbed this one to read while sitting in a waiting room and looking for something light and quick to read. Wasn't really sure what I was getting myself into, but since it's July in Austin, I thought anything that might have snow in it would be a welcome reprieve from the heat. What a fun and well told story by Mr. Sawyer! It delivered on what I expected and was so much more. This was my first book starring Lantham and I'll be looking for others for certain. This is a true whodunit mystery/thriller told by a private detective who gets himself into way more hot water than he intended. The writing was very well done, it wasn't overly descriptive and didn't bog down in places. It was a delightful story of family, drama, mystery with little bits of humor thrown in for good measure. The editing was well done, I didn't see anything in there that made me want to cringe. It was long enough to take me a few sittings to read through, but not too long to drag out. For the story it told, I think the length was absolutely perfect. This book is recommended for thriller/mystery fans and folks looking for something light to read. Well done.
  • A Ghostly Christmas Present on July 18, 2012

    I grabbed this one to read while sitting in a waiting room and looking for something light and quick to read. Wasn't really sure what I was getting myself into, but since it's July in Austin, I thought anything that might have snow in it would be a welcome reprieve from the heat. What a fun and well told story by Mr. Sawyer! It delivered on what I expected and was so much more. This was my first book starring Lantham and I'll be looking for others for certain. This is a true whodunit mystery/thriller told by a private detective who gets himself into way more hot water than he intended. The writing was very well done, it wasn't overly descriptive and didn't bog down in places. It was a delightful story of family, drama, mystery with little bits of humor thrown in for good measure. The editing was well done, I didn't see anything in there that made me want to cringe. It was long enough to take me a few sittings to read through, but not too long to drag out. For the story it told, I think the length was absolutely perfect. This book is recommended for thriller/mystery fans and folks looking for something light to read. Well done.