Sherrie Cronin

Biography

Sherrie Roth grew up in Western Kansas thinking that there was no place in the universe more fascinating than outer space. After her mother vetoed astronaut as a career ambition, she went on to attended Northwestern University studying journalism and physics in hopes of becoming a science writer.
She published her first science fiction short story long ago and then waited a lot of tables while she looked for inspiration for the next tale. When it finally came, it declared to her that it had to be whole book, nothing less. One night, while digesting this disturbing piece of news, she drank way too many shots of ouzo with her boyfriend. She woke up thirty-one years later demanding to know what was going on.
The boyfriend, who she had apparently long since married, asked her to please calm down. He explained that in a fit of practicality she had gone back to school and gotten a degree in geophysics and had spent the last 28 years interpreting seismic data in the oil industry. The good news, according to Mr. Cronin, was that she had found it at least mildly entertaining and ridiculously well-paying. The bad news was that the two of them had still managed to spend almost all of the money.
Apparently she was now Mrs. Cronin, and the further good news was that they had produced three wonderful children whom they loved dearly, even though to be honest that is where a lot of the money had gone. Even better news was that Mr. Cronin turned out to be a warm-hearted, encouraging sort who was happy to see her awake and ready to write. "It's about time," were his exact words.
Sherrie Cronin discovered that over the ensuing decades Sally Ride had already managed to become the first woman in space and apparently had done a fine job of it. No one, however, had written the book that had been in Sherrie's head for decades. The only problem was, the book informed her sternly that it had now grown into a collection of six books. Sherrie decided that she better start getting it on down paper before it got any longer. She's been wide awake ever since, and writing away.

Smashwords Interview

What is the greatest joy of writing for you?
I love the sense of discovery. Making up stories has always been a joy for me, but now that I plan my tales and put them down on paper I have come to appreciate those moments when something happens that totally surprises me. It's great fun and the twists that I didn't see coming turn out to be my favorite parts of each of my books
What do your fans mean to you?
Far more than I would have guessed. I began with the idea that my stories were a creative form of self-expression, and it wasn't until I had that first novel finished that it occurred to me that I desperately wanted to find like minded souls who would read and enjoy what I had written. I'm a shy introvert, so this sudden need for others surprised me.

My books are kind of idealistic and intellectual. There is a fair amount of action and drama too, but at their heart my books are most appreciated by people who like to learn things while they read, and by people who enjoy wondering about human capabilities and the nature of reality and the meaning of life. So when I find a fan, I know that I've also found a kindred spirit of sorts, and that means the world to me. I'm driven now to keep writing the kinds of books that my fans will like.
Read more of this interview.

Where to find Sherrie Cronin online


Where to buy in print


Books

c3
By
Series: 46. Ascending. Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 140,160. Language: English. Published: June 18, 2014. Category: Fiction » Fantasy » Contemporary
(5.00)
A Texan teenager discovers a frightening world in which young girls are sold when she studies abroad in Darjeeling. As she learns of an underworld she never dreamed existed, an ancient group called c3 offers to train her to use her innate skills for out of body travel to save her friends. She accepts their challenge to show those guilty of unspeakable crimes just how powerful a young woman can be.
z2
By
Series: 46. Ascending. Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 132,250. Language: English. Published: June 4, 2013. Category: Fiction » Science fiction » General
(5.00)
Alex once walked away from a rare ability to warp time. Now, he needs to relearn the skill quickly. To protect his daughter he must stop the school he teaches at from turning the clock backwards to an era of white supremacy. An old friend needs Alex to solve an ancient mystery. Both are possible, but only if Alex can learn to control his temporal talents before he runs out of time.
y1
By
Series: 46. Ascending. Price: Free! Words: 125,080. Language: English. Published: December 1, 2012. Category: Fiction » Fantasy » Contemporary
(4.67)
An idealistic shape changer at a pharmaceutical company discovers corporate secrets that hide surprisingly vile plans. Someone will kill to protect mysteries the company has worked so hard to hide. On a sales trip to the South Pacific, he is arrested, hunted by an unsavory boot camp manager, and finds love, all while learning how his unique abilities can keep him from being the next murder victim.
x0
By
Series: 46. Ascending. Price: Free! Words: 116,510. Language: English. Published: March 4, 2012. Category: Fiction » Science fiction » General
(4.40)
A Nigerian beauty searching for her captive sister seeks a fellow psychic to help her. What she finds is a cranky Texan who denies her own talents. An ancient group of telepaths known as x0 wants to ignore both women, but how can they? The sister's captors are turning more dangerous, and common links are forging these two radically different women together in ways that even x0 barely understands.

Sherrie Cronin’s tag cloud

astral projection    being oneself    belize    belize history    boot camps    canoeing    code    code breaking    corporate conspiracy    corporate coverup    crime fiction    dream travel    economic views    economic vision    empathy    female empowerment    gay acceptance    gay fantasy fiction    geophysics    guatelama    hate groups    houston    human trafficking    igbo    immigration    immigration and citizenship    immigration fiction    immigration issues    individual freedom    individual liberty    interactive fiction    kiribati    maya    mayan    mayan code    mayan relics    mind reading    murder    murder and mystery    nigeria    oil    oil and gas industry    out of body experience    pharma    pharma industry    pharmaceutical    pharmaceutical companies    pharmaceutical industry    powers of the mind    puzzle    puzzle solving    relics    rescue    rescue adventure    sailing    samoa    secret organization    secret organizations    secret powers    secret socities    sex trafficking    shape changer    shape changers    shape changing    sisters    skinheads    south pacific    super powers    superpowers    supremacists    teenage superhero    telepathy    texas    time    time alteration    time alterations    time altering    time anomalies    time changes everything    time concepts    time control    time dilation    time distortion    time distortions    treasure    treasure hunt    treasure hunt explorations    treasure hunt mystery    treasure hunting    treasure quest    wealth   

Sherrie Cronin's favorite authors on Smashwords


Smashwords book reviews by Sherrie Cronin

  • Desires Revealed on July 21, 2012

    This book's best qualities surprised me. For one, it does an excellent job of touching on the sheer insanity of religious intolerance. Secondly, the tender and evolving love story between a strong female vampire and a young human girl is told in such a way as to appeal to any human with a heart, and to be a joyful affirmation for young women with similar desires. The title implies more sex than there is, but be assured that there is some lust along with the love, albeit told in a classy manner. I did feel that the book should have been longer. I like the fast pace, but I would have enjoyed more detail about so many things from the fate of the Huguenots to intricacies about the laws of this vampire world. Not much of a vampire fan myself, I found this particular tale to have a few fanged twists that piqued even my interest (although I can't reveal more without spoilers). Finally, as a woman who has spent a lifetime trying yo embrace my own strengths in spite of stereotypes, I found the highly capable Bektamun an absolute delight. I'll be looking for more of her adventures.
  • The Green Stone Tower on July 21, 2012

    This fun and ultimately hopeful book takes the reader along familiar paths lined with faeries, gods and magic powers but introduces enough twists and new ideas to satisfy a jaded fantasy fan like myself. As the fair haired singer Johnny makes his way from the normal lows of a young man's life in a half-real half-mythical world to ultimate love and enlightenment on the other side of the green stone tower, the author manages nice bits of political satire, takes well-aimed jabs at religious intolerance, and even gives unique insights into the character and motivation behind the "evil" god of shadow. Near the end, the book takes a dive into metaphysical concepts, and in my opinion such a direction does not usually go so well for a story. However, in this case philosophical riffs about the nature of life, death, time, and space are well enough handled to preserve the reader's emotional attachment. I wish that 4.5 stars was an option here, because that is what I would like to give this book. I found the pace good, the characters likable, and the story enjoyable. Although the plot ties up nicely at the end, there clearly is a sequel coming and I will be watching for it.
  • Journey To Light: Part I of the High Duties of Pacia on July 22, 2012

    This is a complex and intriguing tale of politics, sacred duties and gifted chosen ones in a fictitious land with tantalizing parallels to our own. The strength of the story lies in the many rich characters and in enjoying the development of their only partially revealed destinies. Because in this first book of three the author is weaving together several story lines that will certainly intertwine eventually, the reader has to be a little patient and be willing to not always move through the plot in a direct fashion. Some story lines are stronger in this first book, and better developed than others. My favorite, and the one that carried the book for me, involves an amnesiac fighter and a prudish sisterhood that will make anyone raised catholic chuckle out loud. Others, like the story of two quasi-human creatures who resemble a wolf and a bat, are sketched more lightly. I am sure more will come later. A reader should consider this full tale to be a three book endeavor. After enjoying the author's wit and imagination throughout this first book, I am anxious to pick up the next one.
  • A Bear Tale on Oct. 02, 2012

    A delightful story about the clash between civilized expectations and the wild in each of us. I particularly liked getting bits of the various animal's points of view, and the author's obvious familiarity with the part of the country that she describes. Although told with a sparse poet's touch, this tale leaves room for wry observations about love, life and road repair. It's not a story without sorrow, but in the end it offers a hopeful message about the places where humans and the rest of the world meet.
  • Goddess-Born (A Tale of Two Worlds) on Dec. 08, 2012
    (no rating)
    I thoroughly enjoyed Goddess Born. Although I also enjoyed Rush’s earlier Green Stone Tower, this is a richer book with more suspense and more levels of intrigue. I enjoyed the underlying political story with its surprising revolutionary who fights with her pen, and appreciated the two poignant love stories, only one of which can end well. The two goddess-born main characters are worth cheering on, both individually and together, yet this book counters their virtue with a thoroughly bad character to boo at, at least one morally ambiguous character, and one of the more horrible mythical monsters I can ever remember. It all takes place in a sort of 1700's-ish world that is believable without a lot of overt detail and into which both magic and revolution fit so nicely. The book offers a few more battle details that I personally care for, and I struggled with gods and goddesses so powerful and yet so human, but these are minor quibbles and perhaps unique to me. Basically, this is a fun fantasy book with a good heart and underlying positive message. I was sorry to see it end.