Grant McHerron

Books

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Smashwords book reviews by Grant McHerron

  • Broods of Fenrir on Dec. 29, 2011

    An enjoyable read that had me hooked from start to finish, travelling through the various plots that were unfolding, running together & merging towards the conclusion. With an interesting approach to the roles & rules of wolf packs and overtones of vampirism in their use of blood to bond & play, the book presents a new look at lycans that's well worth considering.
  • The Man Who Crossed Worlds (Miles Franco #1) on Jan. 06, 2012

    A fast moving story of rival gangs, crooked cops, alternate worlds and a series of plot twists that happen just when you think you've figured it out. All of this portrayed from the gritty perspective of one poor guy who gets caught in the middle of it, admittedly after helping trigger a few of the plot twists himself. The author says he's been influenced by the Dresden series and you can feel it in his works. I really enjoyed reading the book and recommend it to anyone who likes urban grunge fantasy, especially as the mechanics of the "strange stuff that happens" aren't just "make a wish" magic.
  • Rise and Fall: Book One of the Blood and Tears Trilogy on Jan. 29, 2012

    Definitely a good read & worth checking out with plenty of developments & twists across multiple story lines on separate continents. Some of the character developments & plot progressions were "classic" and somewhat expected but certainly not "wooden" by any means. This is perhaps more a reflection on the quantity of works in this genre that I've read than the story itself. The author's personal religion can be easily determined from references in the story to two major entities and their impact on some of the main characters. Meanwhile, the big "twist" at the end was suspected by about two thirds & the confirmation in the final paragraph added to the enjoyment of the book. In short, I enjoyed reading it and recommend it to those who enjoy reading a good epic as it develops. I'm certainly looking forward to the second part in the series.
  • Draykon on Feb. 20, 2012

    A good read & most enjoyable. Possible solutions cannot be eliminated until closer to the end and even then, twists continue to appear to keep you wondering how it's going to come together. From the well crafted alternate reality to the pace of developments, this book is definitely worth reading.
  • Trang on Feb. 20, 2012

    A fascinating approach to the "first contact" scenario with a collection of aliens, bureaucracy, translation errors, scared governments, military muscle, psychic experiences and one poor diplomat stuck in the middle trying to figure it out. The story was well paced and revealed developments at a rate that kept me interested without bombarding me in the process. Worth reading & I'm looking forward to checking out the sequel.
  • Endless (Crescent, Book 1) on March 12, 2012

    This took a bit of effort to keep reading at first. The initial section seemed a bit too long & set up a rather tragic/morose feel that is necessary but, perhaps, extended it a bit longer than required. Once through the initial stages, however, the book begins to flow and the epic/saga feel begins to appear. From this point, the book transitioned into a great read & a fascinating story in a well made "other world" environment with believable characters, a global tale and an interesting approach to "magic." It's worth reading and it's definitely worth getting through the first part. You can't skip it as you need the information & feelings it contains, plus it makes the rest of the book seem even better :) I suspect some people may be turned off during the initial section & not get into the true story, which would be a shame as it's otherwise a good book.
  • Endless (Crescent, Book 1) on March 12, 2012

    This took a bit of effort to keep reading at first. The initial section seemed a bit too long & set up a rather tragic/morose feel that is necessary but, perhaps, extended it a bit longer than required. Once through the initial stages, however, the book begins to flow and the epic/saga feel begins to appear. From this point, the book transitioned into a great read & a fascinating story in a well made "other world" environment with believable characters, a global tale and an interesting approach to "magic." It's worth reading and it's definitely worth getting through the first part. You can't skip it as you need the information & feelings it contains, plus it makes the rest of the book seem even better :) I suspect some people may be turned off during the initial section & not get into the true story, which would be a shame as it's otherwise a good book.
  • I've Been Deader on April 19, 2012

    What could be more fun than a zombie apocalypse road trip? How about getting to see it from both sides of death? With quirky, dark humour and no small level of violence, this book gives you a different perspective on the perils of being a zombie. Thanks to a zombie who can actually think (mostly) we get to see what it's like trying to organise & run a zombie army. Meanwhile, we also get to experience the view of "breathers" (those not yet turned) as they struggle to hold back the tide. While many have only a small part to play, there are some that return throughout the book as the over-arching story line develops. An amusing story that gives a unique perspective on zombie-mania and is fun to read although definitely not for the squeamish.
  • A Storm Hits Valparaiso on April 22, 2012

    Based on the factual history of the liberation of South America from the Spanish, this story mixes actual events with fictional stories & activities for both key historical figures and additional supporting characters caught up in the saga's flow. With characters from England, France, Spain & Latin America, it's a great way to get an overview of the wars of independence & other European events during the 1800's. The writer presents an interesting & enjoyable story that keeps you turning the pages from start to finish and if you've ever been in South America, you'll recognise many of the names & major events. While it could have been a lot more detailed & a much bigger novel, the book stays lean & sticks to the main events with supporting stories around the side. This helps keep it an enjoyable, fast read without getting bogged down in details.
  • Last Man Through the Gate on May 12, 2012

    An interesting short story that has promise but I think squeezing everything into a novella has removed the 'zing' so while I enjoyed the story, I wasn't eager to return to reading it after any interruptions. In hindsight, it feels like the author is playing around with some ideas which wound up spinning off into his "Reality War" series. The result is a tangential leap into a whole different story environment towards the end which, combined with a lot of concepts being squeezed into a small space, means I never really got into the story.