j-views

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j-views is a small publishing operation headquartered in Japan. It provides technical writing, editing and publishing services, using the power of new technology to enable quick and efficient methods of publication.

Just published: Red Wheels Turning, the latest novel by Hugh Ashton

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Red Wheels Turning
By
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 68,030. Language: English. Published: July 15, 2011 by j-views. Category: Fiction » Historical » General
(5.00)
Red Wheels Turning tells the story of British Secret Service agent Brian Finch-Malloy in Tsarist Russia, as he works to prevent the Russian secret war-winning weapons from falling into the hands of the Bolshevik henchman, Kolinski, who makes his way across Europe, leaving a trail of blood and corpses behind him. From the author of the acclaimed alternate history novel, Beneath Gray Skies.
Beneath Gray Skies
By
Price: $4.25 USD. Words: 110,280. Language: English. Published: January 2, 2010 by j-views. Category: Fiction » Literature » Alternative history
(3.33)
Beneath Gray Skies describes a 1920s world that might have been, had the American Civil War never been fought. The new Nazi party in Germany, Confederates, and British and American intelligence services engage in intrigue and treachery, as the giant Bismarck–the largest Zeppelin yet constructed–crosses the Atlantic carrying a priceless gift from the Old World to the New.


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  • I Am Jesus on Jan. 10, 2010

    I've given this piece of writing one star, because to give it none would imply that I hadn't bothered to flag it. Quite apart from the absurdity and arrogance of the writer's claim that he is the only one to tell "the complete truth about life and the hereafter" in one of his other pieces of writing, he manages to cram more factual errors into 762 words than I would have believed possible. For example, he makes a mistake in the name and title of the man who was responsible for the translation work that resulted in the Authorized King James Version of the Bible, and claims that James was responsible for assembling the authorized corpus of the Bible (ignoring the previous 1200 years of history). Not only that, but he gets James's religion wrong as well (a mistake you would hardly credit in someone who is writing about religion). He gets the date of the Roman occupation of Judea wrong, differs from all other authorities on the date of the conversion of Saul of Tarsus, and ignores several sources that he claims do not exist (Josephus, Midrash, etc.). Whether or not you agree with Mr. Whittman's conclusions, such as "Charity is not practical. God helps those who deserve it," he makes a very poor case indeed for his lack of belief in a historical Jesus.
  • 20 No-Cost Marketing Ideas on Jan. 10, 2010

    I found nothing stunningly original here that I haven't considered before - but everything is well-explained without being over-wordy or pompous (a common fault with many of these business strategy books). As "me" pointed out, some of these things will require time and effort - but hey - if good marketing was easy, we'd all be doing it. I'm keeping this list of ideas close at hand to remind me what I should be doing.
  • I Am Jesus on Jan. 11, 2010

    Since Mr. Whittman has taken the trouble to revise his book, probably at least in part as a result of my criticism, I feel honor-bound to revise my criticism. I consider myself to be a reasonably talented author of alternate historical fiction, whereby the history described in the writing is one which has taken a different turn from that we all know. However, I think I have met my match in Mr. Whittman. His account of the Authorized King James Version of the Bible and surrounding events makes for very entertaining reading, and is an interesting variation on history as we know it. Likewise, his revised account of Saul of Tarsus gives some interesting twists to known historical facts, and makes for a different (if somewhat unoriginal) timeline. Congratulations to Mr. Whittman on his success in this new genre of alternate history. Now, if he could only cut out the trite philosophizing... What's that? He's serious? You mean he believes that pseudo-historical nonsense he wrote about the KJV Bible? Well if he does, why doesn't he quote his sources? No, it's fiction. Got to be.
  • Bingo Games – best of breed on Jan. 12, 2010

    What is this? A pathetic attempt at SEO? This is not a book. Not a story. Not creative writing. Not non-fiction. Just a mass of random words.
  • The Paris of the West on Jan. 12, 2010

    Unreadable for me as epub or mobi format. When I opened the RTF, I think I know why. All the 5600 words of the story are in one enormous paragraph, which makes it extremely difficult to read. Some very strange choices of word: "ravished" rather than "ravaged", for example, and some oddities of grammar (as well as a few mistakes). For my taste, too much detail. It's not necessary to describe every little movement and nuance - the reader is left with nothing to do, and no gaps where he or she can use imagination.
  • Sherlock Holmes Investigates. The Free Trade Consortium. on Jan. 18, 2012

    Highly enjoyable for all those who love Sherlock Holmes and his world and are disappointed by the fact that Arthur Conan Doyle stopped the writing the Holmes stories when he did. Some interesting "steampunk" treatment here of the famous sleuth and his sidekick, which still manages to keep the spirit of the original very much alive.
  • Love & Bullets on Jan. 07, 2014

    Pulp - and proud of it! In an age where so many writers and writer wannabes are determined to produce Great Literature, or else to clone others' successes in the paranormal or romance or "mommy porn" categories, it's refreshing to see some good old-fashioned blood and guts which owes nothing to supernatural intervention. I had the pleasure of listening to Mr. Constantine speak and talking to him afterwards at a convention last year, and I, as a devotee of the early 20th-century British pulps (Edgar Wallace et al), find myself in complete agreement with his aims of producing books that set out to entertain and amuse. Love and Bullets does just that. It strains our credulity, and our disbelief is willingly suspended in this fast-moving tale of treachery, deceit, international criminal masterminds, and revenge. The style matches the subject matter, carrying us along in a whirl of action and adventure. Now I have to get the next titles in the series - it's that sort of book.