Jim LeMay

Biography

Jim LeMay is from Missouri, the land of Mark Twain, Edwin Hubble, Walter Cronkite, Robert A. Heinlein, Yogi Berra and many other notable Americans. He has worked at many of the same jobs, professions and avocations as the people in his novels – bartender (and, with his wife, tavern owner), homebrewer, land surveyor, civil engineer and land developer – and a few things they have not (artist and newspaper man among others). He currently lives in the Denver, Colorado metropolitan area with his wife, Nyla.

Smashwords Interview

I understand your first novel, The Shadow of Armageddon, is the first in a post-apocalyptic series. What makes it different from other such novels?
First of all, I’m not crazy about the term “post-apocalyptic.” It implies the prediction of imminent and universal destruction, often with religious connotations. I prefer to think of my novels as end-of-the-world-as-we-know-it. Unlike other such books Armageddon does not rely on Last Man themes, invented diseases or (shudder) zombies. The disaster is indeed caused by an illness but not by a virus which we all love to fear, a highly unlikely possibility. Armageddon describes an extant disease that is vicious and increasingly virulent. True, Connie Willis’ great novel, Doomsday Book, concerns an actual disease but her protagonist had to travel almost 650 years into the past to confront it.
If this is an existing disease and it’s so dangerous, why haven’t we heard about it?
You have. It is antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The news is full of articles concerning the many forms it takes: MRSA (methecillin-resistant Staphlycoccus aureus), enterococcus, MDR-tuberculosis and many others. In the first novel, in 2072 a bacterial infection that doesn’t respond to antibiotics kills 80 to 90% of the earth’s population. No one knows exactly how many died. Too few people survived to maintain civilization, let alone keep track of the death rate. Many of those who remain succumb to starvation, disease or violence.
Read more of this interview.

Where to find Jim LeMay online


Books

Shadow Jack
By
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 134,410. Language: English. Published: March 22, 2015. Category: Fiction » Science fiction » Apocalyptic
In 2072 a mysterious disease sweeps the world, killing nearly everyone. Civilization collapses. A long Dark Age of ignorance and superstition ensues. In the 676th year after the pandemic, Jack, an orphan boy, makes his precarious living as the mysterious thief called the Shadow. His life becomes even more dangerous as he is drawn inexorably into a centuries-old search for a lost cache of gold.
The Shadow of Armageddon
By
Price: Free! Words: 156,810. Language: English. Published: January 4, 2014. Category: Fiction » Science fiction » Utopias & dystopias
In 2072 a deadly disease sweeps the world, killing nearly everyone. Governments and civilization disintegrate. Twelve years later, Matt Pringle’s scroungers meet John Moore, an intelligent orphan boy attracted to the adventurous life he imagines they lead. Matt cannot dissuade him from joining the gang even though death’s shadow stalks it. A larger rival gang chases them across their empty world.
A Shadow Over the Afterworld
By
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 171,220. Language: English. Published: February 21, 2013. Category: Fiction » Science fiction » Apocalyptic
(5.00)
In 2072 the ancient war between mankind and bacteria clash in a worldwide pandemic which kills nearly everyone it infects. Civilization and governments collapse. Gang member John Moore and Mayor’s daughter Alicia Coleridge, despite their very disparate backgrounds, must find out how to adapt to each other and to this new empty, unsympathetic world which many have come to call the Afterworld.

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Smashwords book reviews by Jim LeMay

  • Slow Burn: Zero Day, Book 1 on Jan. 18, 2015

    I'm tired of zombie books, movies, et al. but I'm also a sucker for free books. Glad I read this one for several reasons. The first is the protagonist, Zed, a young man with no particular goal in life. He's flawed but likeable. He faces the advent of this horrible disease cluelessly but adapts, learns and grows. I also found the disease more believable than usual. It's more complex than most "Z-Diseases" with various levels of infection. Zed for example, is one of the slow-burners, who contract the disease but remain mostly normal. Interestingly, he is able to walk among the infected brain-fried (usually) without danger. Other interesting characters appear and interrelate believably. The story is a page turner with the right mix of violence and compassion with a sense of menace always lurking in the background. The only distraction (a minor one) was the book's need for more careful editing.
  • Slow Burn: Infected, Book 2 on Jan. 18, 2015

    The action is not quite as intense as in the first book which is good. It allows time for character development. The sense of menace is always lurking in the background though and the book's end seems to prepare us for a new series of dangerous situations. This book was also more carefully edited than the last.