Judy Reiser

Biography

Judy Reiser began collecting quirks when she divulged something crazy she does (she doesn't remember which one it was—there are so many) and her friend shared something he does. After having a good laugh about it, she soon discovered that everyone has quirks. She has been observing, gathering, marveling at and laughing about quirks ever since and is recognized for helping to bring the subject to the forefront. Her husband insists that had she written the quirk books as an autobiography, they would have been much longer!

Judy personally interviewed thousands of people for her three acclaimed books:
Admit It, You're Crazy!
And I Thought I Was Crazy!
In a Cell Phone Minute

The books have received much media attention with reviews and excepts in prestigious publications such as The New York Times Book Review, AARP Bulletin, Reader's Digest, The Washington Post, Cosmopolitan and many others as well as speaking engagements and appearances on hundreds of national and international radio and television shows.

Judy is also the designer of her books.

Smashwords Interview

How did you get the idea for your two books about people's quirks and idiosyncrasies, "Admit It, You're Crazy! Quirks, Idiosyncrasies & Irrational Behavior" and "And I Thought I Was Crazy! Quirks, Idiosyncrasies & Meshugaa"?
I had a conversation with a friend in which I divulged something crazy I do (I don’t remember which one it was—there are so many!) and he shared something crazy he did. After having a good laugh about it, I soon discovered that everyone has quirks. I've been observing, gathering, marveling at and laughing about quirks ever since. My husband insists that if I had written the quirk books as an autobiography, they would have been much longer!
What are some common quirks people have?
•Refusing to take the top newspaper on a stack (even if perfect).
•Insisting that the toilet paper hang "over".
•Still afraid of the monsters under the bed.
•Waiting for the phone to ring at least twice before answering.
•Keep returning to the refrigerator hoping that something new to eat has materialized.
Read more of this interview.

Where to find Judy Reiser online


Where to buy in print


Books

In a Cell Phone Minute
By
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 18,100. Language: English. Published: July 4, 2014. Category: Nonfiction » Entertainment » Humor and satire
Intriguing stories revealed by cell phone yakkers and eavesdroppers across the globe. You will be charmed by touching romantic connections; lose yourself in wild lost-and-found escapades; cheer at poignant, lifesaving 911 calls—and then howl with laughter at pranksters’ antics, absurd customer service calls, and wacky insurance claims. Go ahead…eavesdrop guiltlessly.
Admit It, You’re Crazy! Quirks, Idiosyncrasies and Irrational Behavior
By
Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 41,050. Language: English. Published: July 2, 2014. Category: Nonfiction » General reference » Curiosities & wonders
Do you refuse to take the top newspaper on a stack (even if perfect)? Insist the toilet paper hang "over"? Wait for the phone to ring at least twice before answering? Hilarious collection of odd behaviors exhibited (and confessed to) by otherwise normal people. Laugh. Chortle. And gasp at people’s quirks. People do the darndest things! NY Times Book Review, Today show, Washington Post, more.
And I Thought I Was Crazy! Quirks, Idiosyncrasies and Meshugaas
By
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 33,780. Language: English. Published: January 28, 2010. Category: Nonfiction » General reference » Curiosities & wonders
Do you refuse to take the top newspaper on a stack (even if perfect)? Insist the toilet paper hang "over"? Wait for the phone to ring at least twice before answering? Hilarious collection of odd behaviors exhibited (and confessed to) by otherwise normal people. Laugh. Chortle. And gasp at people’s quirks. People do the darndest things! NY Times Book Review, Today show, Washington Post, more.

Judy Reiser’s tag cloud

behavior    book    ebook    humor    idiosyncrasies    meshugaas    nonfiction    oddities    phone    phone calls    psychology    quirk    quirks    texting