Benjamin Andrews

Biography

Benjamin Andrews was born in Pocatello, Idaho. He spent his childhood years in small towns around the area, until he moved to Beaverton, Oregon in 2008, where he resides today.

Reading has always been a huge part of his life, and a love of reading quickly developed into a love of writing. Since then he has never looked back.

Where to find Benjamin Andrews online


Books

Rift of Askrah Book 3: Gather
By
Series: Rift of Askrah, Book 3. Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 79,440. Language: English. Published: February 10, 2014. Category: Fiction » Young adult or teen » Fantasy
Gather, Book 3 in the Rift of Askrah series, continues the adventures of Nihlen Draven and his companions. After the confrontation in Falshia, devastating new facts have been revealed. For anyone to claim the title of King of Askrah will come with a price too great to be paid.
Rift of Askrah Book 2: Shatter
By
Series: Rift of Askrah, Book 2. Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 81,770. Language: English. Published: November 13, 2012. Category: Fiction » Young adult or teen » Fantasy
Shatter, Book 2 in the Rift of Askrah series, is the continuation of the events surrounding Nihlen Draven, heir to the throne of the nation of Draven. Having reached safety in the land of Elharlia, the Prince and his friends must begin planning to fight back against their enemies, which only seem to increase by the day. Danger will be faced, and secrets exposed. Answers lead only to questions.
Rift of Askrah Book 1: Fracture
By
Series: Rift of Askrah, Book 1. Price: Free! Words: 90,670. Language: English. Published: November 13, 2012. Category: Fiction » Young adult or teen » Fantasy
Fracture, Book 1 in the Rift of Askrah series, tells the story of Nihlen Draven, heir to the throne of the nation of Draven. His life is turned upside down when his kingdom is invaded by the neighboring nation of Rinh, and he is kidnapped. Escaping only leaves him to deal with the appearance of a strange ability that draws him into a conflict few even know exists in this age of peace.

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Smashwords book reviews by Benjamin Andrews

  • Hal Spacejock on Dec. 02, 2011

    Favorites: Very funny, good writing, interesting characters. Least favorites: Indenting, somewhat stagnate at times. Hal Spacejock, fumbling captain of the barely-able Black Gull is a cowboy of the stars. A cowboy who can't take two steps without something around him going wrong. Catching a break would be asking too much, even catching a meal seems like a pipe dream. No money, no luck, seems like there's no chance. Hal isn't the type to give up though. Set in the future, when intergalactic space travel is common place, this series follows the adventures, or misadventures, of this pilot. I thoroughly enjoyed the writing of Simon Haynes. Hal, as well as other characters created in this world, have very unique personalities. They interact with one another in very believable ways, which pulled me as a reader into the story. Some of the exchanges between Hal and the Black Gull's computer are especially entertaining. The mishaps and adventures are quite inventive. One complaint I have is that the story stagnates at points, due to all the problems faced by Hal. This may be the author's intent, but there were times where I just wanted the story to continue, instead of another problem to drag it on. I would only equate this to a minor difference in story preference between people though. Shouldn't be a deal breaker for most readers. I encountered multiple parts in this book that made me laugh out loud. The dialogue is rich, and some of the things characters say are brilliant. Beyond that, some of the gadgets, and the way robots are portrayed is quite unique. I hope to see the planets and life of the human race in general opened up more in future books though. That's probably the only area description lacked any. Areas with “civilians” were usually gleaned over, and story details focused on instead. Not necessarily a negative, as it was done in a tasteful and workable way that still makes the story rich. One of the biggest turn-offs I found with this book was the indenting. The indents were quiet small, so it sometimes made it difficult to distinguish between paragraphs, particularly in dialogue heavy parts. A minor inconvenience though, and it's not like it isn't separated into paragraphs (Note: I read the Kindle ebook via Smashwords). The author has told me the files available on his website have proper indenting. Overall, I found this book to be a wonderful adventure to take. Readers will quickly find themselves immersed in Hal's world, wondering how he'll bumble his way out of the next jam. It should be very interesting to see what kinds of adventures await him in future installments of this series.
  • The Master's Chair (The Chronicles of Terah #1) on Jan. 20, 2012

    The Master's Chair is a dual-world story, and it is done quite well. I've read/watched a lot of media about our world matched up with a fantasy world, and The Master's Chair does this quite masterfully. Length is definitely a talking point for this book. There is no question that at over 50+ chapters, and almost 250K words, this book will give a lot of bang for the buck. The author was quite generous with the amount of words shared. Admittedly though, I treat this as a double-edged sword. This book is a little outside the conventional in the word count department, and depending on how you feel about it, it may be a lot to digest in one book. The characters themselves are very likeable, and watching the plot come together from both sides is intriguing. Finding out about an alternate life would be quite interesting, and the life discovered by the protagonist in this book would be fascinating. The writing is pulled off in a good fashion. By the end you may wish you could also be pulled into the world of Terah. A literary adventure I'm glad I took.