Melinda Brasher

Biography

Melinda Brasher spends her time writing fiction, traveling, and teaching English as a second language in places like Poland, Mexico, the Czech Republic, and Arizona. Her short fiction and travel writing appear in Ellipsis Literature and Art, Enchanted Conversation, International Living, and others. Visit her online at www.melindabrasher.com.

Smashwords Interview

When you're not writing, how do you spend your time?
Reading, travelling, planning trips, and playing games that challenge my mind.
Do you remember the first story you ever wrote?
I've pretty much always written stories, but my first novel was about a girl whose father should become king. When he hesitates, a charming younger nobleman slips onto the throne instead, destroying everything she knows. It's a living novel, even now, in its most recent incarnation. I hope to publish it soon.
Read more of this interview.

Where to find Melinda Brasher online


Videos

Leaving Home Trailer
Watch a sneak peak of Leaving Home.

Books

Chaos Rises
By
Price: Free! Words: 8,010. Language: American English. Published: March 24, 2014. Category: Fiction » Young adult or teen » Fantasy
Magic isn't as good as beauty or wealth, but for Hala it's something to set her apart, even if her only ability is to summon animals—accidentally—at inconvenient times. Then one night she comes home to find a black-cloaked stranger holding her village under a terrible spell. Will she be able to finally use her magic when it really matters?
Far-Knowing
By
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 78,150. Language: English. Published: November 1, 2013. Category: Fiction » Young adult or teen » Fantasy
(5.00 from 1 review)
When Kalli first meets the young man with the chain, exactly where the spell of far-knowing revealed him to be, he seems pleasant enough. Nevertheless, he must die. His smile hides a ruthless killer, a mage who wields far more power than Kalli fears she'll ever know. Unmatched but undaunted, she plans his destruction, unaware that his best weapon may be her own overconfidence.
Leaving Home
By
Price: $1.99 USD. Words: 20,120. Language: English. Published: August 15, 2013. Category: Fiction » Anthologies » Short stories - single author
(4.67 from 3 reviews)
A train breaks down in the snowy Polish countryside. The jungle awakes. On a cruise ship, paranoia strikes. Fairy godmother magic comes from an unexpected source. A blackmailer makes a mistake. A young father leaves town. A neighbor's death reveals a dark surprise. All this and more in Leaving Home, a collection of twenty short stories, flash fiction, and travel essays by Melinda Brasher.

Melinda Brasher’s tag cloud

adventure    animals    apprentice    blackmail    bridge game    cinderella    commoners    czech republic    dance    fairy tale    fantasy    farknowing    fathers    flash fiction    guatemala    king    lost love    loyalty    mage    magic    nobility    pirate    poland    rapunzel    rivalry    shepherdess    short stories    short story    spells    summoning    teen    tikal    train    travel    truth    young adult   

Smashwords book reviews by Melinda Brasher

  • Two-Fisted Tweets on May 15, 2012

    Very clever! A few were a little crude for my taste, but overall a great read. I laughed out loud. It inspired me to try my hand at the microfiction genre. NOT easy.
  • The Woodlands on Dec. 20, 2013

    The Woodlands, by Lauren Nicolle Taylor, is a YA dystopian novel that I happened on just by chance and really enjoyed, though the ending demands the sequel: The Wall. See the author interview for a story description and more information. First, my grammatical issue: The novel contains many sentence fragments with only the "–ing" form of the verb, as if the clause should have been attached to the previous sentence. Example: "I burst into the Class on the first day. Bleary-eyed, wiping my nose with my sleeve, smearing snot across my face." Fragments can be powerful and punchy, but these just aren't. They leave the reader waiting for the rest of the sentence. It gets distracting after a while. There are also several points which the author beats into us, over and over. They would have been stronger if they'd been more subtle. Otherwise, the writing is very good and draws the reader into the story and the characters. The plot is creepy and exciting and feels fresh for a dystopian novel. Joseph, the love interest, is a little too perfect, but he's what we all want, so it's fun to read. The other characters are interesting and distinctive. I like Rosa's inner struggles and her defiance, which is much of the time so realistically undirected. The setting and the world building are also good. What I LOVE about The Woodlands is the way the society in this book has taken something good like racial tolerance and intermixing, and turned it disturbingly on its head. The leaders encourage people not to see "own kind" but "all kind." Sounds good, right? They manipulate things to get as much interracial marriage as possible. But this has turned into the same thing they were supposedly trying to avoid. Cultural uniqueness is squashed. Pure races are seen as inferior. There's still racial prejudice and oppression, just aimed differently than it used to be. Very, very profound. The Woodlands is a good read, and thought-provoking. I recommend it.
  • The Woodlands on Dec. 20, 2013

    The Woodlands, by Lauren Nicolle Taylor, is a YA dystopian novel that I happened on just by chance and really enjoyed, though the ending demands the sequel: The Wall. See the author interview for a story description and more information. First, my grammatical issue: The novel contains many sentence fragments with only the "–ing" form of the verb, as if the clause should have been attached to the previous sentence. Example: "I burst into the Class on the first day. Bleary-eyed, wiping my nose with my sleeve, smearing snot across my face." Fragments can be powerful and punchy, but these just aren't. They leave the reader waiting for the rest of the sentence. It gets distracting after a while. There are also several points which the author beats into us, over and over. They would have been stronger if they'd been more subtle. Otherwise, the writing is very good and draws the reader into the story and the characters. The plot is creepy and exciting and feels fresh for a dystopian novel. Joseph, the love interest, is a little too perfect, but he's what we all want, so it's fun to read. The other characters are interesting and distinctive. I like Rosa's inner struggles and her defiance, which is much of the time so realistically undirected. The setting and the world building are also good. What I LOVE about The Woodlands is the way the society in this book has taken something good like racial tolerance and intermixing, and turned it disturbingly on its head. The leaders encourage people not to see "own kind" but "all kind." Sounds good, right? They manipulate things to get as much interracial marriage as possible. But this has turned into the same thing they were supposedly trying to avoid. Cultural uniqueness is squashed. Pure races are seen as inferior. There's still racial prejudice and oppression, just aimed differently than it used to be. Very, very profound. The Woodlands is a good read, and thought-provoking. I recommend it.
  • The Night of Elisa - Illustrated Edition LITE on Sep. 25, 2014

    I read the first chapter of this as a stand-alone short story, but now it has turned into a novella, continuing with the characters’ lives. The story has a nice otherworldly atmosphere, reminding me a little of fog-enshrouded Victorian England. I found a bit of awkwardness in the writing: stilted internal dialogue, point of view shifts, overly dramatic word choice here and there, etc., but it was edited pretty well. The plot felt “told,” since much of the action had already happened, and we didn’t really live it with the characters. However, it was nicely creepy how everything came together, and the drawings throughout the book are beautiful: deceptively simple and rather haunting. Warning: one drawing of an unclothed woman. *I was given a free copy in exchange for an honest review*