Richard Adin

Books

This member has not published any books.

Richard Adin's favorite authors on Smashwords


Smashwords book reviews by Richard Adin

  • Sentence of Marriage (Promises to Keep: Book 1) on May 23, 2010

    The Promises to Keep quartet (the 3 primary books and the sequel) are outstanding books. For an indepth review, see the review by An American Editor at http://tinyurl.com/2afznkg.
  • Mud and Gold (Promises to Keep: Book 2) on May 23, 2010

    The Promises to Keep quartet (the 3 primary books and the sequel) are outstanding books. For an indepth review, see the review by An American Editor at http://tinyurl.com/2afznkg.
  • Settling the Account (Promises to Keep: Book 3) on May 23, 2010

    The Promises to Keep quartet (the 3 primary books and the sequel) are outstanding books. For an indepth review, see the review by An American Editor at http://tinyurl.com/2afznkg.
  • A Second Chance on May 23, 2010

    The Promises to Keep quartet (the 3 primary books and the sequel) are outstanding books. For an indepth review, see the review by An American Editor at http://tinyurl.com/2afznkg.
  • Sugar & Spice on March 02, 2011

    Well-written mystery/thriller. Only complaint is that there were a lot of Britishisms that are not understandable to non-British English speakers.
  • Complement for a King I: Search for Audric on March 02, 2011

    I have read every ebook written by Tuttle (most purchased in years past at Fictionwise), and this book and its companion volume adhere to the excellent story-telling tradition of the earlier works. Highly recommend this and every fantasy book written by Tuttle.
  • Complement for a King II: Redemption on March 02, 2011

    I have read every ebook written by Tuttle (most purchased in years past at Fictionwise), and this book and its companion volume adhere to the excellent story-telling tradition of the earlier works. Highly recommend this and every fantasy book written by Tuttle.
  • Brittle Shadows on March 02, 2011

    Yet another excellent book by Tyley. Clearly of the class of PD James. Highly recommend all of her books.
  • Thin Blood on March 02, 2011

    Yet another excellent book by Tyley. Clearly of the class of PD James. Highly recommend all of her books.
  • Sleight Malice on March 02, 2011

    Yet another excellent book by Tyley. Clearly of the class of PD James. Highly recommend all of her books.
  • Amsterdam 2012 on March 26, 2011

    An interesting concept that is not particularly well executed. At best, the book is middling.
  • Olivia's Kiss on March 26, 2011

    A particularly intriguing book. The author could have used some professional editorial help, but even its absence, the book is an excellent buy and and read. A more detailed review is available here: On Books: Olivia’s Kiss (http://americaneditor.wordpress.com/2010/11/09/on-books-olivias-kiss/).
  • The Eagle Society on March 26, 2011

    This book was unreadable as a result of the formatting and grammar/spelling errors. I would not recommend this particular book by Boone.
  • All I Want on April 02, 2011

    I absolutely hate reading short stories. I never buy or read them because they always have left me feeling short-changed. But Shayne Parkinson's All I Want is the exception. Just like her Promises to Keep quartet, this is an outstanding story that complements the world of Amy Lieth. Now, all I want is the next novel in the life of Amy Lieth.
  • Ice Blue on May 13, 2011

    Few authors are deserving of a 5-star review as few books are so well-crafted that they capture my interest and keep it. This is especially true in fiction genres outside of fantasy, which seems to be my preferred genre for the past few years. But Emma Jameson's debut is worth celebrating. Ice Blue is well-written with well-developed and interesting characters. Kate Wakefield reminds me of myself, especially the inability to keep the foot out of the mouth. Like her, I had difficulty working in a structured environment when I considered my superiors fools. I am looking forward to future installments in this series. Like Vicki Tyley, another mystery writer, and Shayne Parkinson, a historical fiction writer, both of whom are available here on Smashwords, Emma Jameson has joined my must-buy list of indie authors.
  • Empire (In Her Name: Redemption, Book 1) on June 22, 2011

    An excellent beginning to an excellent series. I read this first book and before I finished this first volume, I was buying the other 4 books that are currently available. Every book has been a pleasure and hard to put down. Well-formed characters, and nearly no grammar/spelling mistakes to distract the reader.
  • Confederation (In Her Name: Redemption, Book 2) on June 22, 2011

    An excellent followup to Empire. Well-written and definitely captivating. One of the best fantasy series I have read in a long time. Well-worth the price.
  • Final Battle (In Her Name: Redemption, Book 3) on June 22, 2011

    An excellent followup to Confederation. Well-written and definitely captivating. I not only did not want the story to end, but I wanted a promise of more to come. One of the best fantasy series I have read in a long time. Well-worth the price.
  • First Contact (In Her Name: The Last War, Book 1) on June 22, 2011

    Although written as if the United States' political system morphed into the dominant political system of the future, the characterizations of the politicians seems universal. An excellent prequel to the Empire-Confederation-Last Battle trilogy. Well-written and definitely one of the best fantasy series I have read in a long time. Well-worth the price.
  • The Light Horseman's Daughter on Sep. 15, 2011

    Another excellent story. This is the third book written by Crookes that I have read and every one was a fantastic read. There are some errors in the books, but overall they are well written and produced.
  • Redcoat on Sep. 15, 2011

    Another excellent story. This is the second book written by Crookes that I have read -- the first was Blackbird, which is also outstanding -- and every one was a fantastic read. There are some errors in the books, but overall they are well written and produced. After reading this book, I bought all of his books that I hadn't yet read and I'm reading them one after the other.
  • Someday Soon on Sep. 19, 2011

    Another well-written historical novel. My only complaint with all of Crookes' books that I have read to date is that he really needs a proofreader for the ebooks. It becomes tiresome, for example, to read "your" when what is meant is "you're" or "you are". The homonym errors are annoying but not such as to detract from Crookes' natural story-telling abilities.
  • The Academy on Oct. 28, 2011

    One of the most difficult things to do is to write in the first person when the first-person character keeps changing. Yet Trigili pulls this off without a problem. In this case, use of the first person narrative enhances the story. The characters are well-developed and the story interesting. There are a few very minor grammar errors, but they are so insignificant as almost to be not worth mentioning. I look forward to the next volume in the series.
  • The Enemy of an Enemy on Oct. 28, 2011

    I prefer to "buy" a free book, especially if it is the first book in a series, from an unknown author. That is how I discovered this book and author. Volume 1 is well-written and Vydor, the lead character, is multidimensional. Because the story is intriguing and the book so well-written, I purchased (yes, for $$$) the second volume before finishing the first -- I wanted no lag between finishing the first volume and starting the second volume. My only disappointment is that the third and fourth volumes are forthcoming. I'd like to read them NOW. It is worth noting that there are only a few very minor grammatcial and spelling errors -- almost too few to mention. Unlike many of the free ebooks I have tried to read, this one is eminently readable and enjoyable.
  • The Legend of Oescienne - The Finding (Book One) on April 08, 2012

    A basically well-written story that with intriguing characters. It would be a 5-star book except for some glaring misuse of language. For example. Jahrra is expecting Raax to bring the "anecdote" (read: "antidote") to a plague that has infected her foster father. There were a couple of gaffes like this. The problem with this type of gaffe is that it is not easy to quickly know what is meant, as is the case with gaffes like "you're" instead of "your". I give the book 4.5 stars and have purchased the second volume.
  • Daisy's War on May 19, 2012

    I have read the entire series and now Daisy's War. The book is exceptionally well-written, just as were the previous 4 books in the series. Even with the noted "problems" below and in other comments, this is a 5-star book, especially if you look at the series as a whole rather than the book as a standalone book. The description does not do justice to the book. The book is a reflection on World War I and its impact on New Zealand, a far-flung outpost of the British Empire, as seen through the eyes of a child who almost understands the whats and whys of war but can’t quite grasp them. Daisy’s dreams take a back seat to the impact of World War I on her extended family and how the need for soldiers ultimately leads to conscription, beginning with single young men but rapidly moving to include married men with children, including Daisy’s father. The story seems incomplete. We tangentially are given glimpses into the war’s effect on the adults. Because of how the prior books were written, I think Daisy’s War should have run with both major and minor story lines, the major being the tale we are given and the minor a more in-depth look at the effect on the adults. For example, Daisy’s Uncle Alf returns from the battlefields a changed man. We are briefly given a glimpse into why and we know that the children want to avoid him, but we are not given more insight into the change in family dynamics. Perhaps this broader look at intra- and interfamily dynamics is a tale that will be picked up in the next book. However, I think there are 2 failings. First, there was no synopsis of the prior books and of the relationships among the characters. I read the fourth book in the series nearly 2 years ago and have read undreds of books since. I needed a refresher. In this case, the lack of the information poses another problem: The book doesn’t work well as a standalone book. You need to have read the previous books in the series to understand the importance of what is happening. Although that is good from a series sense, it is bad from the reader sense. A reader who picks up this book first, not having read the previous entries in the series, will not walk away singing the high praises the books deserve. Instead, they will be disappointed because much of the impact of book relies on knowing the relationships. Regardless, as with the first four books in the series, Daisy’s War is exceptionally well-written. If you have read and enjoyed the first books in the series, then this is a must read for you. The book is reasonably priced and is clearly a 5-star read. If you haven’t read Shayne Parkinson’s books, begin with Sentence of Marriage, the first in the series, which is free. If you like historical fiction and/or family sagas, you are likely to find this a captivating series.
  • Home Lost on July 02, 2012

    This book is a conundrum. The story is excellent, the characters are interesting -- BUT I do not think the author has yet met a dictionary that he understands how to use. I have rated this book 3 stars because it is free even though it is a poorly edited book. At the price asked, I believe I shoulld be more tolerant of language abuse. However, having read the rest of the series, I think for the price asked for each of the subsequent volume, I am entitled to a professionally edited book, one that doesn't misuse words, omit punctuation, has a clue about the use of the apostrophe with possessives, and understands that there is a reason for the hyphen in compounds. If the author had hired a professional editor to clean up his misuses of language, this would easily have been a 5-star book. But the neverending misuse of language ultimately becomes annoying and highly distracting. The author uses, for example, disburse, when he means disperse; that when he means who; forth when he means fourth; there for their; where for were; etc. Even more problematic are when he cannot remember the names of his characters (e.g., two of several examples, in a later volume the fairy Umi becomes Renee and the baby Niki becomes Nike) and when he doesn't indicate that the scene is changing by using asterisks to separate the paragraphs ending the prior scene and beginning the next scene. It is jarring to be reading and then suddenly wonder what happened to the transition. This book (and series) could be a 5-star series with professional editing. Unfortunately, the author's apparent lack of interest in correcting errors and making the story flow as it should renders this a 2-star volume and series.
  • Cry For Justice on July 17, 2012

    One of the best thrillers/suspense stories I have read in a long time. Well-written and pretty much free of errors (the most prominent error being the switch between Robertson and Roberson), this was a can't-put-down book.
  • The Sixth Discipline on Nov. 13, 2012

    Although the premise of the book is far from unique, the writing is excellent and the story is well told. The characters are interesting and well-developed, and the growth from tolerance to love is well done. The planet is divided into 3 civilizations, each vastly different from the other even though they have a common origin. The story centers on the "arranged" marriage involving 2 of the civilizations; the third civiliation is only passingly mentioned. The story requires you to accept that 3 such unique civilizations can coexist yet know so little about the others. However, the story is written well-enough that this is a very minor irritant. Unlike many books, this one had very few errors. When I finally got around to reading it, finished the book in 1 day. I plan to next read the sequel, No Safe Haven.
  • No Safe Haven on Nov. 13, 2012

    Excellent followup to The Sixth Discipline. Well written although predictable. I found that I enjoyed the story enough that I read it in 1 day. I like the interaction between Ran-Del and Francesca, the main characters in both books, enough that I wish additional books revolving around them were available.
  • Forged In Flame (In Her Name: The First Empress, Book 2) on March 13, 2013

    The story and the writing are great, just as was true of the other novels in the Empire and In Her Name series. But there is one problem. Multiple chapters are in italics. I find it difficult to read so much text in italics -- especially when there appears to be no reason for using italics. I don't know if this was a deliberate decision or something went wrong in the creation of the ePub file, but at least this reader is unhappy -- not with the writing or the story, but with the extensive use of italics, nearly every other chapter. If you find reading italic print is difficult, then this book should be avoided even though it is exceptionally well-written. I rate the book 5 stars for the writing and the story development. I think it unfair to rate a book based on formatting problems that are easily corrected. However, as much as I looked forward to buying and reading this book, had I known of the italics problem in advance, I would not have bought the book. At my age, it is simply too difficult and tiring to read so many chapters in italic.
  • When Women Were Warriors Book I: The Warrior's Path on April 21, 2013

    I think this book deserves 5+ stars. Unlike many indie-authored books, this is well written, virtually error-free, and provides a coherent story about a naïve girl who grows up among strong women. I downloaded this book many months ago and finally got around to reading it. I am very sorry I took so long to get to it. I found the characters so-well formed that I spent the day reading the book from beginning to end. The different personalities and the insights each brings to shaping naïve Tamra's world, especially her warrior Maara and the Lady Merin, make this a compelling read. The problem is that the tale continues in volumes 2 and 3 in very expensive ebooks ($9.99 each). As good as this first volume is, I personally find it difficult to spend $9.99 on each of the subsequent volumes; I would not have hesitated at $4.99 each. I think that if you are unfazed by such pricing, then you should definitely read this volume and be prepared to continue the adventure. If you are unwilling to spend $9.99 for each subsequent volume, then you might want to think about whether it is worth your while to read this first volume knowing you will not get the whole story. But, again, this volume is excellent, and worthy of 5+ stars. I just do not know if the subsequent volumes are equally as good and thus justify the price asked.