RJ Lopez

Biography

Please stay tuned for more works coming very soon. If you've enjoyed any of my stories feel free to email me your thoughts and comments, I'd love to hear back from my readers about anything they've read of mine.

Also recently Sleeping Giant has been released for free on BarnesandNoble.com at
http://search.barnesandnoble.com/Sleeping-Giant/RJ-Lopez/e/2940000832936

The Tales of Blood Stripe company will be coming fairly frequently so be sure to check back for more of their adventures.

My wonderful cover designer Tanya Bechara can be contacted at tnbechara@gmail.com or her website http://www.tanyabechara.com if you have any questions, comments, or need your own amazing cover designed.

Books

New Tiber: A Tale of Blood Stripe Company
By
Price: Free! Words: 6,950. Language: English. Published: April 13, 2010. Category: Fiction » Science fiction » General
The first tale of the adventures of Blood Stripe company, an elite force of marines from a future full of adventure and mystery. The first adventure of a marine company fighting to avenge the death of their comrades, and for the glory of the Alliance they serve. Follow their tales under the leadership of the courageous Brother-Captain Jonathan Davis and the mysterious Inquisitor Daniel Ithil.
Sleeping Giant
By
Price: Free! Words: 22,590. Language: English. Published: March 5, 2010. Category: Fiction » Thriller & suspense » General
What happens when someone stops trying to make sense of the world the way it is and lashes back at it? You avoid the unknown stranger, but when it's someone you know who snaps can your world ever be the same? When their dark fantasies and daydreams cross the line into reality will you be able to survive? Will you want to?

RJ Lopez’s tag cloud


Smashwords book reviews by RJ Lopez

  • Sleepwalker: The Last Sandman on April 12, 2010

    Sleepwalker: The Last Sandman is an enjoyable read that takes the reader from the world of commonplace to the world of imagination. Marlowe presents an original take on the world of dreams, and the forces and myths that bind our world to theirs. The backstory created to explain the novel's plot is an enjoyable layer of depth not often seen, and adds further entertainment value to the story. The primary criticism with the book is addressed within the plot itself, one cannot live another persons dream. While Marlowe's dreamland is entertaining and enjoyable, the reader can have difficulty creating a firm connection to the story itself. Marlowe presents the world of imagination and dreams in such vivid detail, that it can be difficult for the reader to create their own visualization and connection to the story as it unfolds. As with any story, the reader must accept the fantasy they are about to enter, but there are moments where the setting and character rationales can overwhelm instead of enthrall. The themes and obstacles faced by the characters are not as fantastic and unbelievable as the setting, and the reader can easily identify with the emotion and thought process each character undergoes. The transparency of the characters emotions invokes personal connections between the reader and story as the plot continues in a way that can only add to the overall reading experience. While the land of Nod may not exist, the emotions the characters and the reader undergo while progressing through the plot surely do. Sleepwalker: The Last Sandman is a read that will if anything inspire the reader to have dreams of their own. That is not to say the story is bad, but instead to say the author successfully provokes the reader to think of the Nod they visit every night when they sleep, and wonder what adventure they will have of their own after finishing the book. Perhaps too all encompassing for a casual beach day or rainy day, the book is most definitely an enjoyable experience for a casual reader looking for a story to work their way through .
  • Music, Food, and Death (The State Of New Orleans Through The Eyes Of The Strippers) on April 12, 2010

    Mailer provides the reader with an uncensored look at a population rocked back onto their heels by catastrophe, and at times the reader almost wishes the work was fiction. The realities news coverage revealed during Katrina were difficult for outsiders to accept, and the portrayal of life in the Big Easy post-Katrina will be no easier. Mailer acknowledges the lives beyond the tourist brochures and concierge recommendation, and offers a glimpse at a dark but honest reality of life in the big city after tragedy.