Stephen England

Biography

Writing isn’t just what I do. It’s who I am.

The desire to write is nothing new—I’ve been writing for over ten years. In that time I’ve put my keyboard to just about everything—novels, short stories, political opinion pieces, even the odd bit of poetry. The manuscripts from my early days will never see the light of day, much to the collective relief of the world: it is said the definition of self-improvement is when you can recognize your previous work for the ill-written trash it was.

My efforts at writing culminated in the publication of Sword of Neamha by Lulu Publishing in December of 2009. A first-person adventure novel set in pre-Roman Britain, the story was very much a departure from my previous efforts. Covering over thirty years, Sword chronicled the rise and fall of a kingdom as seen through the eyes Cadwalador, a young Gallic warrior caught in the middle of civil war.

Following the publication of Sword of Neamha, I’ve turned back to my first love: counterterrorism thrillers. Pandora’s Grave, the debut novel of the Shadow Warriors series, is coming out this summer, introducing the world to CIA paramilitary operations officer Harry Nichols.

Pandora’s Grave is a complete novel in and of itself, but it is the start of a series, and work has already begun on the sequel, Day of Reckoning.

Where to find Stephen England online


Where to buy in print


Books

This member has not published any books.

Smashwords book reviews by Stephen England

  • Dreams Unleashed, Book 1 of The Prophecies Dystopian Trilogy on Nov. 18, 2011

    Dreams Unleashed is one of those rare books that seem to defy easy categorization, yet manage to enchant, nonetheless. Written in the first-person, Dreams is told through the eyes of Ann Torgeson, a former member of the CIA's Project Stargate--the Agency's research into remote viewing and psychic prediction of threats against the nation. Fast-forward to the year 2015 and Torgeson is a member of an underground organization, fighting against the totalitarian government she once served. To the government, she is nothing more than a weapon--a weapon they want back, very badly. Dreams is an unusual, but well-written, mix of dystopian espionage and metaphysical science fiction. In some ways, the metaphysical elements reminded me of Frank Herbert's Dune books. It's possible that some of the secondary characters could have used a little extra development, but that's a common weakness of the first-person point of view and it does not detract from one's enjoyment of the story. Reading through Dreams Unleashed, it is most important to remember that it is the first novel in a trilogy, and like all trilogies, most of the first book is spent setting the stage for the events to follow. I've already downloaded the sequel and am buckling in for the ride. Heartily recommended for any fan of the genre.
  • Dreams Unleashed, Book 1 of The Prophecies Dystopian Trilogy on Nov. 28, 2011

    Dreams Unleashed is one of those rare books that seem to defy easy categorization, yet manage to enchant, nonetheless. Written in the first-person, Dreams is told through the eyes of Ann Torgeson, a former member of the CIA's Project Stargate--the Agency's research into remote viewing and psychic prediction of threats against the nation. Fast-forward to the year 2015 and Torgeson is a member of an underground organization, fighting against the totalitarian government she once served. To the government, she is nothing more than a weapon--a weapon they want back, very badly. Dreams is an unusual, but well-written, mix of dystopian espionage and metaphysical science fiction. In some ways, the metaphysical elements reminded me of Frank Herbert's Dune books. It's possible that some of the secondary characters could have used a little extra development, but that's a common weakness of the first-person point of view and it does not detract from one's enjoyment of the story. Reading through Dreams Unleashed, it is most important to remember that it is the first novel in a trilogy, and like all trilogies, most of the first book is spent setting the stage for the events to follow. I've already downloaded the sequel and am buckling in for the ride. Heartily recommended for any fan of the genre.
  • Wrath - the life and assassination of a United States Governor on Jan. 25, 2012

    Set against the backdrop of the Kentucky Bluegrass and the birth of the American progressive movement, author Howard McEwen spins a turn-of-the-century tale of one man's lust for power and his willingness to destroy any who stood in his way. William Goebel, the son of German immigrants, rises from poverty to political office in Kentucky, driven by what Nietzsche called "der Wille zur Macht". The will to power. McEwen's portrayal of the historical Goebel is of a man who'll stop at nothing to bend fate to his iron will, a man filled with contempt for those he considers weaker than himself, for those he manipulates to do his bidding. In many ways, Goebel is the classic progressive. Juxtaposed against the political career of William Goebel is the parallel story of the shadowy mountain man who will take his life. Two men from separate walks of life--on a collision course. The result is a gripping look into the politics of late nineteenth-century America. There are moments when the book becomes weighed down by the details of the political process, and a couple times I had to page back to remind myself of the chronology, but those are minor points. The end product of McEwen's first foray into fiction is one of the most interesting historical novels that I've read in a while. Highly recommended for anyone who is interested in the period, and anyone trying to discern how we arrived at our current political situation.