Secular religious stories

Series Order
Newest
Genesis, We Begin
Series: Secular religious stories, Book 1. Price: $2.99 USD. (Free until Dec. 31!) Words: 31,520. Language: English. Published: November 28, 2018. Categories: Fiction » Historical » Ancient
"Genesis, We Begin" is a fictional history of the twelve thousand year old Gobekli Tepe archeological site recently unearthed in Southwest Turkey. The story imagines people and events which might have existed at the emergence of civilization. "Genesis, We Begin" is a secular retelling of the book of Genesis
The Lord
Series: Secular religious stories, Book 2. Price: $2.99 USD. (Free until Dec. 31!) Words: 5,660. Language: English. Published: December 15, 2013. Categories: Fiction » Historical » Ancient
“The Lord” is a 5000 word short story which narrates a secular explanation for the traditions in the period of history between Abraham and Moses. It hopefully respects the sensibilities of the three major religions that hold this period to be governed by the supernatural. The story is part science fiction and part speculative religious history.
Joshua Maximus, The Gospel According To The Storyteller
Series: Secular religious stories, Book 3. Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 15,670. Language: English. Published: November 28, 2013. Categories: Fiction » Historical » Ancient
"Joshua Maximus, The Gospel According To The Storyteller” is a novellette of 15,700 words.The genre is historical religious fiction revolving around Jesus and John the Baptist. The story provides a secular interpretation of two of the most significant religious figures in history. This is a secular interpretation of supernatural events and should not be confused with "Christian Book" genre.
The Disciple
Series: Secular religious stories, Book 4. Price: $1.99 USD. Words: 2,770. Language: English. Published: December 20, 2013. Categories: Fiction » Humor & comedy » Satire
“The Disciple” is a 2600 word, irreverent, satirical farce. It is a tongue-in-cheek offering to those who take every word in the King James Bible as absolute literal truth and exclude the possibility that other interpretations and faiths are as valid as their own. The story supposes what Satan would have done after he had been rejected by Jesus in the Garden that night.