Nonfiction » True Crime » Espionage

Implosion at Los Alamos: How Crime, Corruption and Cover-ups Jeopardize America's Nuclear Weapons Secrets
Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 99,290. Language: English. Published: June 20, 2016. Categories: Nonfiction » True Crime » Espionage, Nonfiction » Politics and Current Affairs » Current affairs
2011 IPPY Award Winner Implosion At Los Alamos is a frightening exposé that reveals failed security, crime, mismanagement, cover-ups, and corruption at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Ground Zero for America’s strongest defense against rogue nations and terroristic entities -- at least it should be.
Chinese Intelligence Operations
Price: $5.99 USD. Words: 47,670. Language: English. Published: November 22, 2011. Categories: Nonfiction » Politics and Current Affairs » Current affairs, Nonfiction » True Crime » Espionage
This book is by far the best ever published on the subject. The author makes extensive use of primary and secondary sources including active Chinese Intelligence officers, internal Chinese documents, and publications. His approach is clearly analytical with no unsupported opinions. This work is the only one of its kind. It remains a "bible" in the Intelligence Community.
Master Spy: The Life of Robert P. Hanssen
Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 100,990. Language: English. Published: July 23, 2012. Categories: Nonfiction » Biography » Military biography, Nonfiction » True Crime » Espionage
For fifteen years, government worker Robert Hanssen passed along to the Soviets over 6,000 pages of top secret and classified information, including information on the U.S. investigation of smuggling nuclear weapons to third world countries and the entire plan for the continuity of the U.S. government if suddenly attacked. This is the story behind the man who so heinously betrayed his country.
Judith Coplon Barnard College Graduate Justice Department Political Analyst Russian Spy?
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 2,540. Language: English. Published: November 8, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » True Crime » Espionage, Nonfiction » Politics and Current Affairs » Communism and socialism
Judith Coplon is an aberration in the annals of American-Soviet espionage. Convicted twice for spying for the Soviet Union, she nevertheless remained free on bail. Her two convictions, in 1949 and 1950, weren't resolved until 1967. There are numerous questions why the U.S. government failed to pursue Coplon's imprisonment. My e-book looks at the circumstances of her spy convictions and the era.

Related Categories