Nonfiction » Art, Architecture, Photography » Architecture » Criticism

New Delhi: New Annotated Edition
Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 23,720. Language: English. Published: August 9, 2017 by INDEX ebooks. Categories: Nonfiction » Art, Architecture, Photography » Architecture, Nonfiction » Art, Architecture, Photography » Architecture
Just before New Delhi was inaugurated as capital of colonial India in February 13, 1931, the magazine "The Architectural Review" published an issue devoted to a study of the new capital of India, with texts, criticisms, and photographs by Robert Byron. In this edition, the texts and photographs of the author are complemented by annotations and links to modern photos of the buildings and places.
Practice of Consumption and Spaces for Goods
Price: $6.48 USD. Words: 37,980. Language: English. Published: April 18, 2013. Categories: Essay » Sociology, Nonfiction » Art, Architecture, Photography » Architecture
The practice of consumption and the spaces for goods are in continuous evolution, constantly eluding typological and functional definition. One of the objectives of this book is to understand what mechanisms are at work, what competences, the roles which have impacted on, still impact on today and will continue to impact on this sector in the future.
Moscow's Cathedral of Christ the Savior
Price: $9.99 USD. Words: 112,590. Language: English. Published: January 18, 2013. Categories: Nonfiction » Art, Architecture, Photography » Architecture, Nonfiction » Art, Architecture, Photography » Architecture
Translated for the first time into English, Kirichenko’s absorbing account brings to life the history of Russia’s largest church--its origins, conception, the fits and starts of its planning and construction, the life that developed in and around the Cathedral, its demise in the Soviet period--and its recent reincarnation.
Death of American Architecture
Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 52,830. Language: English. Published: November 27, 2012 by The von Raesfeld Agency. Categories: Nonfiction » Art, Architecture, Photography » Architecture, Nonfiction » Politics and Current Affairs » Social policy
American architecture is dying a slow, agonizing death, akin to a disease that eats away at the human spirit. The individualist creative minds in American architecture flourished between the World Wars - Organic, Arts & Crafts, Art Deco. Now the death toll rings monotonously as artistic endeavors of architectural design melt into mediocrity. Greatness is poorly imitated and rarely improved upon.