Nonfiction » Reference » Quotations

Tragedy and Self-Destruction as Humor in Microliterature, Volume 2
Price: Free! Words: 339,410. Language: English. Published: October 18, 2015. Categories: Nonfiction » Entertainment » Humor and satire, Nonfiction » Reference » Quotations
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The PDF version on a tablet or larger size screen offers the BEST READING EXPERIENCE. It RENDERS CORRECTLY IN ADOBE ACROBAT READER but not in Adobe Digital Editions. Tragedy & Self-Destruction shows how microliterature entertains, informs and persuades in its treatment of everyday life and the extremes of the human condition. Find your own situation reflected and perhaps re-defined through humor.
Tragedy and Self-Destruction as Humor in Microliterature, Volume 1
Price: Free! Words: 366,420. Language: English. Published: October 18, 2015. Categories: Nonfiction » Entertainment » Humor and satire, Nonfiction » Reference » Quotations
The PDF version on a tablet or larger size screen offers the BEST READING EXPERIENCE. It RENDERS CORRECTLY IN ADOBE ACROBAT READER but not in Adobe Digital Editions. Tragedy & Self-Destruction shows how microliterature entertains, informs and persuades in its treatment of everyday life and the extremes of the human condition. Find your own situation reflected and perhaps re-defined through humor.
The Elements of Fiction
You set the price! Words: 130,290. Language: English. Published: March 2, 2014. Categories: Nonfiction » Reference » Quotations, Nonfiction » Reference » Writing skills
It was John Gardner, the legendary teacher of the craft, who said that the elements of fiction, like the words in a language, are finite. Oh, are they? I thought, and set about to verify this by collecting authors’ quotes about them. This task began as a cheat sheet, a short list of those elements I recognized and documented by quotes, but soon took on a life of its own. This is the result.
They Cooked the Books
You set the price! Words: 51,120. Language: English. Published: August 31, 2011. Categories: Nonfiction » Reference » Quotations
A fascinating historical tour of some of today’s most familiar financial expressions. For instance, “Cooking the books” originated in England when the Earl of Strafford said: “The proof was once clear; however, they have cooked it ever since.” - the Earl was referring to altering ingredients in a recipe - not the “creative accounting” all too common in today’s business world.

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