Nonfiction » Reference » Quotations

Tragedy and Self-Destruction as Humor in Microliterature, Volume 2
Price: Free! Words: 339,410. Language: English. Published: October 18, 2015. Categories: Nonfiction » Entertainment » Humor and satire, Nonfiction » Reference » Quotations
(5.00 from 1 review)
The PDF version on a tablet or larger size screen offers the BEST READING EXPERIENCE. It RENDERS CORRECTLY IN ADOBE ACROBAT READER but not in Adobe Digital Editions. Tragedy & Self-Destruction shows how microliterature entertains, informs and persuades in its treatment of everyday life and the extremes of the human condition. Find your own situation reflected and perhaps re-defined through humor.
Tragedy and Self-Destruction as Humor in Microliterature, Volume 1
Price: Free! Words: 366,420. Language: English. Published: October 18, 2015. Categories: Nonfiction » Entertainment » Humor and satire, Nonfiction » Reference » Quotations
The PDF version on a tablet or larger size screen offers the BEST READING EXPERIENCE. It RENDERS CORRECTLY IN ADOBE ACROBAT READER but not in Adobe Digital Editions. Tragedy & Self-Destruction shows how microliterature entertains, informs and persuades in its treatment of everyday life and the extremes of the human condition. Find your own situation reflected and perhaps re-defined through humor.
A Dictionary of Love - Over 650 quotes on love from the profane to the profound arranged alphabetically
You set the price! Words: 30,310. Language: English. Published: March 16, 2012. Categories: Nonfiction » Reference » Quotations, Nonfiction » Relationships and Family » Family relationships
(5.00 from 1 review)
NEW EXPANDED EDITION! A Dictionary of Love with 22 more subject categories and over 50 more authors than the first edition. A Dictionary of Love consists of over 650 quotes on love from the profane to the profound arrange alphabetically in 213 subject categories by more than 350 authors, philosophers and celebrities including Kahlil Gibran, Bertrand Russell, Erich Fromm, and Mother Teresa.
They Cooked the Books
You set the price! Words: 51,120. Language: English. Published: August 31, 2011. Categories: Nonfiction » Reference » Quotations
A fascinating historical tour of some of today’s most familiar financial expressions. For instance, “Cooking the books” originated in England when the Earl of Strafford said: “The proof was once clear; however, they have cooked it ever since.” - the Earl was referring to altering ingredients in a recipe - not the “creative accounting” all too common in today’s business world.

Related Categories