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Comments on Tyler Paytas' Essay (2019) "Divine Hiddenness as Kantian Theodicy"
Series: Intimations of Political Philosophy. Price: $2.00 USD. Words: 2,770. Language: English. Published: March 3, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Christian Theology / Anthropology, Nonfiction » Philosophy » Good & evil
In 2019, Tyler Paytas, at Australian Catholic University, publishes an essay “Of Providence and Puppet Shows: Divine Hiddenness as Kantian Theodicy”. The argument knits two theological questions together. My comments examine this article using the triadic structure of judgment, the category based nested form and the interscope of the society tier.
Comments on Dennis Venema and Scot McKnight’s Book (2017) Adam and the Genome
Series: Reverberations of the Fall. Price: $2.40 USD. Words: 9,330. Language: English. Published: June 24, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Christian Theology / Anthropology, Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Religion & Science
These comments address a book by geneticist, Dennis Venema, and theologian, Scot McKnight. Venema establishes that Adam and Eve cannot be the actual parents of all humans. McKnight establishes the stories of Adam and Eve are written in styles and themes of ancient Near East literature. My goal is to re-articulate their arguments using the category-based nested form and the first singularity.
Comments on Daniel Novotny’s Essay (2017) Izquierdo on Universals
Disputation 17 of the Baroque scholastic treatise The Lighthouse of the Sciences (1659) covers the topic of universals. Sebastian Izquierdo wrote the treatise. Daniel Novotny published a summary in the Spring 2017 issue of the American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly. My comments demonstrate the postmodern relevance of this topic, using the category-based nested form.
Comments on James Madden’s Essay (2017) A Thomistic Theory of Intentionality
This work comments on an essay by James D. Madden published in the Winter 2017 edition of The American Catholic Quarterly. The essay is titled, “Is a Thomistic Theory of Intentionality Consistent with Physicalism?” My goal is to re-articulate the argument in the specialized language of the category-based nested form.
Comments on Father Reniero Cantalamessa’s (2016) Fourth Advent Sermon
Series: Re-Articulations. Price: $1.50 USD. Words: 4,550. Language: English. Published: February 11, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Christian Theology / Anthropology, Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Religion & Science
This essay comments on Father Raniero Cantalamessa’s advent sermon for the Pontifical Household. The lecture is on the nature of Mary in regards to Christmas. My goal is to re-articulate the argument in the specialized language of the category-based nested form.
Being Human: Interviews With Cherith Fee Nordling
Series: You're Included. Price: Free! Words: 18,630. Language: English. Published: August 8, 2016 by Grace Communion International. Categories: Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Christian Theology / Anthropology
Jesus is the Word made flesh, God become human. As a perfect human being, he shows us what humanity really is. In these interviews, Cherith Fee Nordling talks about what Jesus' incarnation tells us about being human, being souls in bodies. This has implications for our sexuality both now and in eternity. How does this help us cope with life difficulties?
The Inevitable Twist: Comments on Lamoureux’s Question
Series: Reverberations of the Fall. Price: $1.25 USD. Words: 2,320. Language: English. Published: March 22, 2015. Categories: Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Biblical Criticism & Interpretation / Old Testament, Nonfiction » Religion & Spirituality » Christian Theology / Anthropology
These comments wrestle with the implications of Denis Lamoureux’s article, entitled “Beyond Original Sin: Is a Theological Paradigm Shift Inevitable?” published in the March 2015 issue of Perspectives on Science and Christian Faith [67(1): 35-49]. The ideas of Julian Jaynes are used for comparison.