Nonfiction » Philosophy » Movements / existentialism

Soren Kierkegaard Attacks the Church
By Robert Herrmann-Keeling
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 51,270. Language: English. Published: February 24, 2014. Category: Nonfiction » Philosophy » Movements / existentialism
A philosopher-theologian’s scholarly but highly readable book on Soren Kierkegaard, Danish “father of modern existentialism.” Chapters include: his life, his literary methods, his themes, his attack on the 1840s Danish church for “making a fool of God,” an objective life of Jesus, a summary of the first-generation church, and Kierkegaard’s message to the church in our time. Bibliography.
Paranoia
By Plamen Chetelyazov
Price: Free! Words: 25,460. Language: English. Published: October 11, 2012. Category: Nonfiction » Biography » Autobiographies & Memoirs
“Paranoia” is a personal life story constructed of memoirs in the form of short essays. It reveals my primitive complexes, inmost emotions and cracked dreams. A tale about an escape from the elemental impulses and social cliches through a journey. A path that rambles between the unbearable hypocrisy of the sentiment-free society, an self-destructive self-denial and an awe of the natural insanity.
Mammon III: Thriving in the Age of Austerity
By Newton Fortuin
Price: Free! Words: 42,020. Language: English. Published: July 16, 2012. Category: Nonfiction » Philosophy » Movements / existentialism
At its core Mammon essentially is a critique of The Secret. That is despite its much broader context. Why then read a book about what many, including Deepak Chopra, refer to as ridiculous? And so many years after it was first published? The primary reason is that Mammon expounds a philosophy for thriving in a climate of adversity. This is particularly relevant given the global economic crisis.
Mammon I: Demise of Critical Thinking in the Age of The Secret
By Newton Fortuin
Price: Free! Words: 41,780. Language: English. Published: July 11, 2012. Category: Nonfiction » Philosophy » Movements / existentialism
This installment argues that "The Secret" is emblematic of the greater social milieu we are finding ourselves in at this time. For this reason I isolated it as a particularly good example of how similar frauds are conveyed. It shows how easily we may unknowingly give away our power to quacks and con-men. That's if we fail to think critically, instead to abandon our sanity to reckless delusion.