Nonfiction » Social Science » Ethnic Studies / Native American Studies

The Fighting Colonel: Ranald S. Mackenzie's Leadership on the Texas Frontier - Conflicts Between White Settlers and Comanche Indians at Battles of Blanco Canyon, McClellan's Creek, Palo Duro
Price: $6.99 USD. Words: 39,730. Language: English. Published: January 28, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » History » Military, Nonfiction » Social Science » Ethnic Studies / Native American Studies
The Texas frontier during the years following the Civil War was a dangerous place. Comanche constantly harassed and raided white settlements. Despite the efforts of President Ulysses S. Grant's Peace Policy, conflict between white settlers and Indians persisted.
Analysis of Health Service Support with Frontier Surgeons and Ambulance Corps to 1876 Centennial Campaign - Sheridan's War Against the Sioux and Cheyenne Native American on Indian Hunting Grounds
Price: $6.99 USD. Words: 33,150. Language: English. Published: January 27, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Social Science » Ethnic Studies / Native American Studies, Nonfiction » History » Military
The Centennial Campaign of 1876 is a valuable example of warfare between the US and Native Americans. Originally conceived as a punitive campaign, three columns of combined cavalry and infantry units under the overall command of General Phillip Sheridan converged on the Sioux and Cheyenne Indian hunting grounds with the goal of subduing recalcitrant groups.
The Northern Cheyenne Exodus: A Reappraisal of the Army's Response - Why it Took the Army Seven Months and One Thousand Miles to Capture Fleeing Indians Under Chiefs Dull Knife and Little Wolf
Price: $6.99 USD. Words: 45,440. Language: English. Published: January 26, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Social Science » Ethnic Studies / Native American Studies, Nonfiction » History » Military
The Northern Cheyenne, along with other tribes the US Government forcibly removed to IT, never considered it home. Their home was on the Northern Plains. Treaty misrepresentations had left the Northern Cheyenne tribe in limbo for most of the past decade because the past treaties did not deal with them as an individually separate tribe, independent from their cousins, the Southern Cheyenne.