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Assorted Language Stuff
Price: Free! Words: 69,110. Language: English. Published: July 25, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » English as a second language
maybe and maybe not
Language Idea
Price: Free! Words: 139,490. Language: English. Published: July 25, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » English as a second language
language idea
Supplemental Multi Language Education Material
Price: Free! Words: 156,340. Language: English. Published: July 24, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » English as a second language
A selected text auto translated into several languages. Concern with PDF and operating systems. Try various. Thank you.
In Heat and Flaming in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 1,946,660. Language: English. Published: July 5, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
A reference for Chinese kanji glyphs used in the Japanese language using elements referring to flaming in heat, with pronunciations in both kana and romaji, definitions published by external sources, vocabulary examples and stroke count, with grade and JLPT levels. Each glyph includes its comprising elements, hyperlinks to other glyphs in which it appears, and related glyphs.
Mouths and Orifices (Part 2) in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 1,837,950. Language: English. Published: June 13, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of some entries: Chinese glyph meaning "orifice, mouth, bodily cavity, aperture" is 口. When used alone, it can refer to any sort of entrance portal. Two together 吅 mean "rowdy behavior, deceitful." Moreover, three together 品 represent "the goods, merchandise, stuff for sale." So ask yourself, what merchandise of the old days was equipped with three bodily orifices? (See part 1 for more.)
Mouths and Orifices (Part 1) in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 2,082,600. Language: English. Published: June 13, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of some entries: Chinese glyph meaning "orifice, mouth, bodily cavity, aperture" is 口. When used alone, it can refer to any sort of entrance portal. Two together 吅 mean "rowdy behavior, deceitful." Moreover, three together 品 represent "the goods, merchandise, stuff for sale." So ask yourself, what merchandise of the old days was equipped with three bodily orifices? (See part 2 for more.)
Method of the 6: English
Price: Free! Words: 57,900. Language: Portuguese. Published: January 27, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Reference » Foreign language study, Nonfiction » Language Instruction » English as a second language
O Method of the 6 é a maior oportunidade de aprender Inglês em aulas de video com o autor da obra. É o mais revolucionário Método de Ensino e Aprendizagem do Inglês. O Método tem uma simplicidade quase que matemática na forma como guia o aluno ao domínio da língua inglesa.
Dogs and Pussycats in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 1,741,610. Language: English. Published: January 26, 2018. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Example of an entry: The Chinese zodiac glyph meaning "canine, dog (male), bitch (female)" is 戌, and when combined with "flowing fluids" (氵) and "flaming in heat" (火), the resulting glyph means "to extinguish, quench." Obviously, the old Chinese sages were vividly depicting that when animals in heat achieve fluid flows, sexual libido is quenched for a time. More than 800 other glyphs are analyzed.
Children in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 962,820. Language: English. Published: January 23, 2018. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of some entries: One of the Chinese glyphs meaning "child" is 子. When the element 乃 (to possess, possessive grammatical case) is added, the resulting glyph means "pregnant" (孕). Combine 子 with "plate, tray" (皿), the meaning becomes "firstborn son" (孟, the one who gets the food). And, with 犭 (pig, dog, animal) added to 孟, the meaning is "aggressive, ferocious, suddenly violent."
Aristotle's Metaphysics in English, Latin and Ancient Greek: Trilingual Edition
Price: Free! Words: 222,990. Language: English. Published: December 25, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Ancient Languages
This volume presents a trilingual edition of Aristotle's Metaphysics. Each paragraph has an English, Latin and (original) Ancient Greek rendition. Students of Classics or anyone interested in ancient philosophy and languages should find in this trilingual edition an a helpful device to approach Aristotle original Greek.
International Communication, Education, Language and Social Science Conference
Price: Free! Words: 82,970. Language: English. Published: December 18, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Education & Study Guides » History, Nonfiction » Language Instruction » English as a second language
Presenters outline their work under the following main themes: Arts, Language, History, Linguistics, Literature, Philosophy, Psychology, Education and Learning.
Fluid Flows in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 2,145,970. Language: English. Published: July 24, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
The Chinese glyph element meaning "fluid flow" is 氵. When "crotch" (又) is added, the resulting glyph means "Chinese people" (汉). Combined with "rotate, screwing, filled" (十) the meaning becomes "juice, sap, gravy" (汁). And with "group of woodies" (林) the meaning becomes "gonorrhea, filter chunks, lonely" (淋). Adding "night" (夜) results in "secretion" (液), obviously. More than 900 glyphs analyzed.
Crotches in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 1,698,450. Language: English. Published: July 24, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of some entries: The Chinese glyph meaning "crotch, again, yield, both, more and more" is 又. When the element "female" (女) is added, the resulting glyph means "slave" (奴). Four crotches (叕) means "well connected." Crotches are found in many places, including woods and trees (枝). Combined with "meat and skin" (肌) the meaning becomes "whiff, rump" (股). More than 700 glyphs are analyzed.
Wood and Woody in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 1,831,430. Language: English. Published: July 22, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of some entries: The Chinese glyph meaning "wood, woody" is 木. When the element "spread legs" (冂) is added, the resulting glyph means "prick" (朿). Combined with "many emissions" (灬), the meaning becomes "hero, outstanding person, excel" (杰). Obviously, the old Chinese sages were vividly depicting the same vernacular used in English today. More than 800 glyphs are analyzed.
Shamans in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 2,233,120. Language: English. Published: July 22, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
The word "shaman" (巫, and others) originated in a region that is today part of China, and referred to women who performed divination and doctoring (witch-doctors), among other essential services provided to the local populace, not the least being purveyors of religious and sexual services. More than 800 glyphs are analyzed.
Rumps and Buttocks in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 2,543,910. Language: English. Published: June 19, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of entries: The Chinese glyph meaning "corpse" "buttocks" or "genitalia" is 尸, and when combined with "to put out" (出), the resulting glyph 屈 means "submissive, feeling wronged, bend over." Combined with "utmost" (屋), it refers to merchandising. Obviously, the old Chinese sages were vividly depicting other than a just feeling. More than 1,000 other glyphs are analyzed.
Foot Binding and Busting Feet Bones in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 2,321,020. Language: English. Published: June 16, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
At its peak, the Chinese practice of busting and binding the feet bones of young girls lamed nearly half the female population. While undeniably a cultural embarrassment by today's standards, it succeeded in preventing one's property from escaping. With such widespread prevalence, it not only made an enormous impact on society, but also is referenced in thousands of glyphs, with over 900 analyzed.
Cocks and Copulation in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 2,063,560. Language: English. Published: June 16, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of entries: The Chinese zodiac glyph meaning "cock, rooster" is 酉, something that roosts or sits atop something else. This same glyph also refers to a wine jug, and cocky behavior. Not surprisingly, when combined with "wood" (木), the result is "soft." And when combined with "royal mouth" (呈), the meaning is "uncomfortable hangover" (酲). More than 1,000 other glyphs are analyzed.
Horsing Around in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 1,198,380. Language: English. Published: June 16, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Example of an entry: The Chinese zodiac glyph meaning "horse" is 午, and when combined with "wood" (木), the resulting glyph (杵) means "to poke into, pestle." The general use glyph (馬) also refers to repetitive mentulomaniacal behavior of males. Obviously, the old Chinese sages were vividly depicting ubiquitous activity of many species, not only humans. More than 400 other glyphs are analyzed.
Females in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 2,654,570. Language: English. Published: June 15, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of some entries: A glyph meaning "all the same, alike" (如) combines "female" (女) with "orifice" (口); "female child" comprises "what is liked" (好, guess why); "female under one's roof" (安) means "inexpensive, safe, easy"; "female on female" (㚣) as "lewd." Obviously, the old Chinese sages were vividly depicting the traditional male view of females worldwide. Over 1,000 glyphs are analyzed.