Books tagged: ancient hawaii

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Found 3 results

Strong Roads: A Spanish-Shipwreck Survivor in Ancient Hawaii
Price: $9.99 USD. Words: 128,820. Language: English. Published: August 31, 2015. Categories: Fiction » Holiday » Adventure
In 1565 the Spanish perfected, after 40 years of failure, a circular course between Acapulco Mexico and Manila, in the Philippines. Their ships, laden with silver ingots, were sent from Acapulco every year until the early 1800's. Stories exist that the Hawaiian Islands were known to the Spanish before their 'discovery'. Beyond this, Hawaiian stories accurately tell of people washing ashore their l
For You are Beautiful
Price: $1.99 USD. Words: 6,810. Language: American English. Published: October 3, 2014. Categories: Fiction » Fantasy » Short stories, Fiction » Romance » Short stories
While shipwrecked on the Sandwich Islands, King Kamehameha allows the officers and crew to stay while their ship is made seaworthy. Officer Hancock falls in love with Kamea, the daughter of Kalei, a powerful holy priest who speaks to spirits. Her love for Hancock bothers Kalei, and when asked if they could marry, Kalei quickly plots a contest that Hancock must win or be put to death.
Punahou Blues: THE LOST CHAPTERS (The Fishpond)
Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 4,430. Language: English. Published: January 15, 2012. Categories: Fiction » Historical » Western & American frontier, Fiction » Literature » Literary
Puko'o Fishpond had been built in the 1500s by the king of Moloka'i. Before its construction, a man named Kilo had told the king that the work could not be done without the help of kahunas. The king said Kilo's punishment for this outburst was to be cooked alive in an imu when the pond was complete. Instead of worrying about his impending doom, Kilo organized the men from Moloka'i into a long line from the ocean up into the mountain. Stones were passed hand-to-hand down to the men building the walls. The tramping of so many feet raised a big red cloud of dust over Puko'o that blotted out the sun. The men's hair and skin turned red. They threw dust into each other's faces and said, "Kanaka o Moloka'i ehu i ka lepo," a protest slogan over having to slave for the king. Kilo told the men that he would soon be part of the swirling red dust when the pond was finished.