Books tagged: asian studies

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Found 24 results

In Heat and Flaming in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 1,946,660. Language: English. Published: July 5, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
A reference for Chinese kanji glyphs used in the Japanese language using elements referring to flaming in heat, with pronunciations in both kana and romaji, definitions published by external sources, vocabulary examples and stroke count, with grade and JLPT levels. Each glyph includes its comprising elements, hyperlinks to other glyphs in which it appears, and related glyphs.
Mouths and Orifices (Part 2) in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 1,837,950. Language: English. Published: June 13, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of some entries: Chinese glyph meaning "orifice, mouth, bodily cavity, aperture" is 口. When used alone, it can refer to any sort of entrance portal. Two together 吅 mean "rowdy behavior, deceitful." Moreover, three together 品 represent "the goods, merchandise, stuff for sale." So ask yourself, what merchandise of the old days was equipped with three bodily orifices? (See part 1 for more.)
Mouths and Orifices (Part 1) in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 2,082,600. Language: English. Published: June 13, 2019. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of some entries: Chinese glyph meaning "orifice, mouth, bodily cavity, aperture" is 口. When used alone, it can refer to any sort of entrance portal. Two together 吅 mean "rowdy behavior, deceitful." Moreover, three together 品 represent "the goods, merchandise, stuff for sale." So ask yourself, what merchandise of the old days was equipped with three bodily orifices? (See part 2 for more.)
National Sovereignty: Perdana Discourse Series 7
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 18,270. Language: English. Published: February 27, 2018. Categories: Nonfiction » Social Science » Political science
This publication contains the proceedings of the seventh Perdana Discourse Series organised in 2008 in Putrajaya, Malaysia. At the Discourse, the fourth Prime Minister of Malaysia, His Excellency Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad, dissects the meaning of national sovereignty in relation to Malaysia and how it weighs on policy decisions.
Dogs and Pussycats in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 1,741,610. Language: English. Published: January 26, 2018. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Example of an entry: The Chinese zodiac glyph meaning "canine, dog (male), bitch (female)" is 戌, and when combined with "flowing fluids" (氵) and "flaming in heat" (火), the resulting glyph means "to extinguish, quench." Obviously, the old Chinese sages were vividly depicting that when animals in heat achieve fluid flows, sexual libido is quenched for a time. More than 800 other glyphs are analyzed.
Children in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 962,820. Language: English. Published: January 23, 2018. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of some entries: One of the Chinese glyphs meaning "child" is 子. When the element 乃 (to possess, possessive grammatical case) is added, the resulting glyph means "pregnant" (孕). Combine 子 with "plate, tray" (皿), the meaning becomes "firstborn son" (孟, the one who gets the food). And, with 犭 (pig, dog, animal) added to 孟, the meaning is "aggressive, ferocious, suddenly violent."
Fluid Flows in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 2,145,970. Language: English. Published: July 24, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
The Chinese glyph element meaning "fluid flow" is 氵. When "crotch" (又) is added, the resulting glyph means "Chinese people" (汉). Combined with "rotate, screwing, filled" (十) the meaning becomes "juice, sap, gravy" (汁). And with "group of woodies" (林) the meaning becomes "gonorrhea, filter chunks, lonely" (淋). Adding "night" (夜) results in "secretion" (液), obviously. More than 900 glyphs analyzed.
Crotches in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 1,698,450. Language: English. Published: July 24, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of some entries: The Chinese glyph meaning "crotch, again, yield, both, more and more" is 又. When the element "female" (女) is added, the resulting glyph means "slave" (奴). Four crotches (叕) means "well connected." Crotches are found in many places, including woods and trees (枝). Combined with "meat and skin" (肌) the meaning becomes "whiff, rump" (股). More than 700 glyphs are analyzed.
Wood and Woody in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 1,831,430. Language: English. Published: July 22, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of some entries: The Chinese glyph meaning "wood, woody" is 木. When the element "spread legs" (冂) is added, the resulting glyph means "prick" (朿). Combined with "many emissions" (灬), the meaning becomes "hero, outstanding person, excel" (杰). Obviously, the old Chinese sages were vividly depicting the same vernacular used in English today. More than 800 glyphs are analyzed.
Shamans in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: Free! Words: 2,233,120. Language: English. Published: July 22, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
The word "shaman" (巫, and others) originated in a region that is today part of China, and referred to women who performed divination and doctoring (witch-doctors), among other essential services provided to the local populace, not the least being purveyors of religious and sexual services. More than 800 glyphs are analyzed.
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