Books tagged: asian studies

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Found 21 results

Dogs and Pussycats in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: $8.00 USD. Words: 1,696,780. Language: English. Published: January 26, 2018. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Example of an entry: The Chinese zodiac glyph meaning "canine, dog (male), bitch (female)" is 戌, and when combined with "flowing fluids" (氵) and "flaming in heat" (火), the resulting glyph means "to extinguish, quench." Obviously, the old Chinese sages were vividly depicting that when animals in heat achieve fluid flows, sexual libido is quenched for a time. More than 800 other glyphs are analyzed.
Children in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
Price: $8.00 USD. Words: 992,350. Language: English. Published: January 23, 2018. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of some entries: One of the Chinese glyphs meaning "child" is 子. When the element 乃 (to possess, possessive grammatical case) is added, the resulting glyph means "pregnant" (孕). Combine 子 with "plate, tray" (皿), the meaning becomes "firstborn son" (孟, the one who gets the food). And, with 犭 (pig, dog, animal) added to 孟, the meaning is "aggressive, ferocious, suddenly violent."
Flaming in Heat in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
You set the price! Words: 1,959,930. Language: English. Published: July 24, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of some entries: The Chinese glyph meaning "flame, in heat" is 火. When the element "犭" (animal, swine, dog) is added, the resulting glyph means "barbarian, berserker, low-ranking government employee" (狄). Combined with "head and neck exposed, in danger" (⺈) and "a long time, since long ago" (旧), the meaning becomes "lust, passion" (焔). More than 700 glyphs are analyzed.
Fluid Flows in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
You set the price! Words: 2,128,230. Language: English. Published: July 24, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
The Chinese glyph element meaning "fluid flow" is 氵. When "crotch" (又) is added, the resulting glyph means "Chinese people" (汉). Combined with "rotate, screwing, filled" (十) the meaning becomes "juice, sap, gravy" (汁). And with "group of woodies" (林) the meaning becomes "gonorrhea, filter chunks, lonely" (淋). Adding "night" (夜) results in "secretion" (液), obviously. More than 900 glyphs analyzed.
Crotches in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
You set the price! Words: 1,754,010. Language: English. Published: July 24, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of some entries: The Chinese glyph meaning "crotch, again, yield, both, more and more" is 又. When the element "female" (女) is added, the resulting glyph means "slave" (奴). Four crotches (叕) means "well connected." Crotches are found in many places, including woods and trees (枝). Combined with "meat and skin" (肌) the meaning becomes "whiff, rump" (股). More than 700 glyphs are analyzed.
Wood and Woody in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
You set the price! Words: 1,872,610. Language: English. Published: July 22, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of some entries: The Chinese glyph meaning "wood, woody" is 木. When the element "spread legs" (冂) is added, the resulting glyph means "prick" (朿). Combined with "many emissions" (灬), the meaning becomes "hero, outstanding person, excel" (杰). Obviously, the old Chinese sages were vividly depicting the same vernacular used in English today. More than 800 glyphs are analyzed.
Shamans in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
You set the price! Words: 2,222,820. Language: English. Published: July 22, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
The word "shaman" (巫, and others) originated in a region that is today part of China, and referred to women who performed divination and doctoring (witch-doctors), among other essential services provided to the local populace, not the least being purveyors of religious and sexual services. More than 800 glyphs are analyzed.
Rumps and Buttocks in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
You set the price! Words: 2,434,030. Language: English. Published: June 19, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of entries: The Chinese glyph meaning "corpse" "buttocks" or "genitalia" is 尸, and when combined with "to put out" (出), the resulting glyph 屈 means "submissive, feeling wronged, bend over." Combined with "utmost" (屋), it refers to merchandising. Obviously, the old Chinese sages were vividly depicting other than a just feeling. More than 1,000 other glyphs are analyzed.
Foot Binding and Busting Feet Bones in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
You set the price! Words: 2,188,260. Language: English. Published: June 16, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
At its peak, the Chinese practice of busting and binding the feet bones of young girls lamed nearly half the female population. While undeniably a cultural embarrassment by today's standards, it succeeded in preventing one's property from escaping. With such widespread prevalence, it not only made an enormous impact on society, but also is referenced in thousands of glyphs, with over 900 analyzed.
Cocks and Copulation in Chinese Kanji: Debunking Confusion
You set the price! Words: 2,093,560. Language: English. Published: June 16, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Language Instruction » Japanese
Examples of entries: The Chinese zodiac glyph meaning "cock, rooster" is 酉, something that roosts or sits atop something else. This same glyph also refers to a wine jug, and cocky behavior. Not surprisingly, when combined with "wood" (木), the result is "soft." And when combined with "royal mouth" (呈), the meaning is "uncomfortable hangover" (酲). More than 1,000 other glyphs are analyzed.