Books tagged: bonobo

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Found 4 results

Strange New Feet
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 68,410. Language: English. Published: June 11, 2010. Categories: Fiction » Science fiction » General
Dr. Ivan Vogler has found a way to save a dying species of chimpanzee. But at what cost to humans? As scientists and politicians scramble to protect the world from the new threat he has created, one child becomes the target of public outrage. Olivia Barnes is thrust into a firestorm of hate, fear and violence at the tender age of fourteen. To survive, she must prove to the world that she is human.
Growing Up Sam
Price: $1.99 USD. Words: 3,860. Language: English. Published: June 15, 2011 by Olo Books. Categories: Fiction » Science fiction » Short stories
Hi. I Sam. I half bonobo, half human. That make people want to kill me. I not care. I play in my steel room. But then something go very wrong. Honorable Mention, The Year's Best Science Fiction: Twenty-Second Annual Collection "affecting"-- SF Site "strong...In tone the story resembles Flowers for Algernon.... Yuan-Innes pulls off quite a difficult balancing act." --Challenging Destiny
Embryos in Space
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 10,130. Language: English. Published: June 16, 2011 by Olo Books. Categories: Fiction » Science fiction » Short stories
Award-winning author and physician, Melissa Yuan-Innes, explores the strange new worlds of embryo transplantation ("Red"), human-ape genetic engineering ("Growing Up Sam"), and exile (two Shaolin monks banished to outer space in "Iron Monk") in an exclusive collection of her science fiction stories.
Lobulated ears: natural selection gone bionic?
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 4,030. Language: English. Published: December 24, 2012. Categories: Nonfiction » Science and Nature » Life Sciences / Anatomy & Physiology Life Sciences / Human Anatomy & Physiology, Nonfiction » Science and Nature » Life Sciences / Zoology / Primatology
Join us in interviewing our own ear lobe, an unassuming flap of pure skin that assumes more significance the more it is scrutinised. Unique social complexity plus a technical niche has – we hypothesise – created selective pressure in Homo sapiens for an organ allowing personal standing to be updated in ways that were not just more artful than in any ape, but the start of our bionic revolution.