Books tagged: dickinson

These results show books which have been specifically tagged with this keyword. You can also try doing a general search for the term "dickinson" .
You may also limit results to books that contain two tags.
Some content may be filtered out. To view such content, change your filtering option.

Found 3 results

Emily Dickinson Biography: The Secrets Behind Emily Dickinson’s Life, Poetry and Legacy
Series: Biography Series. Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 8,150. Language: English. Published: September 13, 2017 by Digital Publishing Group. Categories: Nonfiction » Biography » Literary biography, Nonfiction » Literary criticism » Poetry
What inspired Emily Dickinson to write so many poems and become one of the greatest American poets of all time? After her death, Dickinson gained popularity. She tried to make a change in the world through her writings, innermost feelings and inspirations. Despite all the critics, Emily Dickinson did not seek any recognition but the poetry was aimed at her individuality and perception of the world
The Voice at the Door
Price: $9.99 USD. Words: 38,830. Language: English. Published: December 11, 2013 by Fuze Publishing. Categories: Fiction » Historical » Colonial America
The Voice at the Door recreates the fateful meeting of Emily Dickinson with the famous Philadelphia pastor, Charles Wadsworth. The fictional account weaves her letters and poems into a tapestry of intellectual and spiritual communion. It encompasses the three great mysteries of Emily Dickinson’s life: her agonized love poetry, her partial blindness, and her subsequent withdrawal from the world.
The Lonely House: A Biography of Emily Dickinson
Series: Unofficial Biographies, Book 8. Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 10,120. Language: English. Published: March 19, 2013 by BookCaps. Categories: Nonfiction » Biography » Literary biography
During her lifetime, Emily Dickinson did not seek out recognition or attempt to change the world around her, even in the smallest way. A private but not antisocial person, she kept her life’s work, and her innermost feelings, almost entirely to herself. Her life was rich in intellectual pursuits, and she had many friends with whom she exchanged witty and brilliant letters, but she rarely left the