Books tagged: fictional characters

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Found 4 results

From Experience to Innocence: The Zen in Hemingway's Heroes
Series: Continuing Education. Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 4,270. Language: English. Published: June 12, 2016. Categories: Essay » Literature, Nonfiction » Reference » Study guides
This particular look at the development of Hemingway's heroes from the perspective of Zen thought is part of our Continuing Education Series, which hopes to provide readers with thoughtful consideration of various books, stories and essays.
Living and Breathing: How to Make Your Characters Come Alive
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 18,570. Language: English. Published: April 22, 2014. Categories: Nonfiction » Reference » Writing skills
Create and develop fictional characters who are multi-dimensional and believable, whether based on real people or larger-than-life creations from your very own vivid imagination. Make your characters come alive. Included are tips for creating family backgrounds and family histories for a character, examples of many character traits, use of dialect and dialogue, and sample character sketches.
Writing Characters Who'll Keep Readers Captivated: Nail Your Novel
Price: $6.93 USD. Words: 42,810. Language: English. Published: May 1, 2013. Categories: Nonfiction » Reference » Writing skills, Nonfiction » Reference » Publishing and books
How do you create characters with depth? How do you write the opposite sex? What makes teenagers sound authentic? Inhabitants of a dystopia? How do you write plausible antagonists and chilling villains? How do you inhabit a character who isn't like you? Whether you write literary or genre fiction, this book shows you how to create people who keep readers hooked and make you want to tell stories
Creating Realistic Characters
Price: $5.99 USD. Words: 2,630. Language: English. Published: February 28, 2011 by FrostProof808. Categories: Nonfiction » Reference » Writing skills
A realistic character is just like a real human being, and the reader should be able to identify with the protagonist, the antagonist, and a minor character or two as soon as he meets them. The more quickly the reader identifies with the character, the more quickly he will become engaged in the story line.