Books tagged: florida keys

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Found 87 results

The 3rd Key: Sharks in the Water
Series: Mike Scott thriller series. Price: $4.99 USD. Words: 85,260. Language: English. Published: August 18, 2017. Categories: Fiction » Adventure » Sea adventures, Fiction » Thriller & suspense » Action & suspense
Sharks are attacking divers in the Florida Keys. Mike Scott barely survives the first incident. But it doesn’t make sense. Is there something else going on? Is it the statue itself? Or is there a larger conspiracy? It’s up to Mike to unravel the mystery before anyone else gets hurt. Or killed.
Snook Recover After 2010 Cold Snap
Pre-release—available September 17, 2017. Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 2,560. Language: English. Categories: Nonfiction » Sports & outdoor recreation » Scuba & Snorkeling, Nonfiction » Science and Nature » Life Sciences / Marine Biology
All in all, snook demonstrate a great comeback for an iconic species with some protection in place, the positive effect of spillover from protection as a fishery management technique, and the importance of protecting diverse habitats to ensure the transition of juveniles to the adult population.
The Eagle Has Landed... or Not
Pre-release—available September 10, 2017. Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 2,760. Language: English. Categories: Nonfiction » Sports & outdoor recreation » Scuba & Snorkeling, Nonfiction » Science and Nature » Life Sciences / Marine Biology
One of the most popular charismatic mega fauna in our waters is the spotted eagle ray. Kim Bassos-Hull, from Mote Marine Laboratory, has been collecting data in the Florida Keys to enhance and expand her studies, but as of today, no critical habitats for feeding, mating and pupping have been found. Kim and the Mote crew have captured, documented and tagged over 300 rays in the last 4 years.
Oh! Those Sweet Red Lips!
Pre-release—available August 27, 2017. Price: $0.99 USD. Words: 2,530. Language: English. Categories: Nonfiction » Sports & outdoor recreation » Scuba & Snorkeling, Nonfiction » Science and Nature » Life Sciences / Marine Biology
I want to spend more time watching redlip blennies. They mate beginning at first light in two week cycles that start ten days before the full moon. The mating sessions last about three hours each morning, and males generally have female visitors every day. Sometimes the same females come back, but usually there are different mixes among males and females.
Damselfish May Be More Aggressive Than You Think
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 2,500. Language: English. Published: August 20, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Sports & outdoor recreation » Scuba & Snorkeling, Nonfiction » Science and Nature » Life Sciences / Marine Biology
How aggressive are damselfish, pound for pound? As it turns out, divers invading their space is not the only thing damselfish exhibit aggression over. I don’t blame them for defending their territory when I’m trying to get a shot. That’s common, and can be comical. The species in our waters vary in size, color and behavior. There is an excellent, detailed chapter on all the damselfish species.
Spadefish Have to Dig Their Way Out of a Hole
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 2,650. Language: English. Published: August 13, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Sports & outdoor recreation » Scuba & Snorkeling, Nonfiction » Children's Books » Animals / Marine Life
Spadefish are the only species of its family that reside in the Western Atlantic. In the Pacific there are at least six species, where they are commonly known as batfish. While they are common in the Keys, in other parts of the Caribbean they are not as prevalent. I’ve seen schools numbering in the hundreds from Molasses up to Carysfort. One of the largest schools I’ve seen was on Deep French.
Wrasses: the Smartest Fish?
Series: Marine Life. Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 2,430. Language: English. Published: July 30, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Sports & outdoor recreation » Scuba & Snorkeling, Nonfiction » Science and Nature » Life Sciences / Marine Biology
Wrasses are a large and diverse family, and seem to be everywhere. They are quick and colorful. Perhaps some of the most vibrant colors on our reefs belong to the family of wrasses. Worldwide there are over five hundred species of wrasse. Here we have about twenty. Most species are carnivorous, feeding on small crustaceans.
This Goat Is a Hero
Series: Marine Life. Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 2,690. Language: English. Published: July 23, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Sports & outdoor recreation » Scuba & Snorkeling, Nonfiction » Science and Nature » Life Sciences / Marine Biology
Classified as a “nuclear” species, goatfish truly play a leadership role. Other species are attracted to the substratum-disturbing foraging. And when several goatfish are involved in the fray, the groupies increase in number and diversity. Goatfish groups attract up to six follower species. While many of the follower species eat the same food, the goatfish don’t seem to mind.
All Puffed Up
Series: Marine Life. Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 2,650. Language: English. Published: July 16, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Sports & outdoor recreation » Scuba & Snorkeling, Nonfiction » Science and Nature » Life Sciences / Marine Biology
Puffers are a group of fish I like to shoot, especially the big ones. They have a shy, jovial personality. At least they always look like they are smiling. Puffers are related to boxfish, and are also toxic, but in a different way. I found references to two toxins, tetrodotoxin (TTX) and saxitoxin (STX), which are nerve agents. They are chemically distinct, but act on the nervous system similarly.
Let's Wake Up an Eel and Go Hunting
Series: Marine Life. Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 2,780. Language: English. Published: June 25, 2017. Categories: Nonfiction » Sports & outdoor recreation » Scuba & Snorkeling, Nonfiction » Science and Nature » Life Sciences / Marine Biology
While the majority of observations during the day are while eels are resting or on a cleaning station, a few times I have seen an eel coupled with a grouper. The first time I saw it was on the Winch Hole. A graysby came to a stop on a pile of rubble, and a goldentail came out from its lair. At first they just sort of looked at each other, then came cheek to cheek, touched, and took off together.