Books tagged: medical appeal

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Found 4 results

Looks Could Kill
Price: $1.50 USD. Words: 66,950. Language: English. Published: July 29, 2013. Categories: Fiction » Thriller & suspense » Spies & espionage, Fiction » Themes & motifs » Medical
A vicar drops dead after a christening. A mother believes her daughter is evil. Emma Jones has a lethal ability. She becomes a doctor. Some of her patients drops dead. But others are watching her and want to use her powers.
Cupping | الحجامة
Price: Free! Words: 50,420. Language: Arabic. Published: May 6, 2013 by Amin-sheikho.com. Categories: Nonfiction » Health, wellbeing, & medicine » Alternative medicine, Nonfiction » Health, wellbeing, & medicine » Cancer
The Marvelous Medicine that Cured Heart Disease, Paralysis, Hemophilia, Migraine, Sterility and Cancer - A Prophetic Medical Science in its New Perspective. | الدواء العجيب الذي شفى من مرض القلب القاتل والشلل والسرطان- الحجامة علم نبوي طبي في منظوره الجديد.
Deadly Benefits
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 120,550. Language: English. Published: May 6, 2013. Categories: Fiction » Mystery & detective » General, Fiction » Themes & motifs » Medical
(5.00)
A young mother dies in the intensive care unit and the medical center goes into a defensive tailspin. Fingers point to a fatal medication error by moonlighting pharmacist, Heli Harri. But Heli bites back and begins a chase for the truth that becomes a surefire prescription for hidden danger and unexpected romance, while behind the white drape of medicine, a chilling murder almost goes undetected.
The One-Day New Body Makeover
Price: Free! Words: 36,840. Language: English. Published: January 22, 2012 by Banty Hen Publishing. Categories: Nonfiction » Health, wellbeing, & medicine » Medicine
Much of what's written about cosmetic surgery in newspapers and magazines, and even in some medical journals, is half-truth, myth, or advertising. The media has distorted public perception with overly negative or sensationalized stories, and medical specialty organizations contribute to the mayhem by promoting warring viewpoints to establish their own market share.