Books tagged: tax allocation

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Found 4 results

U.S. Taxes for Worldly Americans: The Traveling Expat's Guide to Living, Working, and Staying Tax Compliant Abroad (Updated for 2018)
Price: $9.99 USD. Words: 30,320. Language: English. Published: April 22, 2018. Categories: Nonfiction » Business & Economics » Accounting, Nonfiction » Law » Tax law
Are you a citizen of the United States who lives abroad? You probably know America is one of only two countries that taxes its citizens on their worldwide income, regardless of where they live or work. If you’re thinking about becoming a digital nomad or expatriating to another country, do you know how to avoid paying unfair taxes on your income while abroad?
Taxation IPs (Principles of Nepal taxation with examples)
Price: Free! Words: 98,900. Language: English (Indian dialect). Published: March 21, 2018. Categories: Nonfiction » Law » Tax law, Nonfiction » Business & Economics » Tax planning
Nepal Tax principles and examples based on Income Tax Act, 2058 and Value Tax Act, 2052.
A Walk Through Income Tax
Price: $2.08 USD. Words: 103,520. Language: English. Published: May 26, 2016. Categories: Nonfiction » Law » Educational Law & Legislation
BASIC CONCEPTS History of Income Tax The tax was introduced for the first time in India in 1860 by Sir James Wilson in order to cover up losses sustained by the government due to mutiny of 1857. There were many amendments from time to time, at last a separate Income Tax Act was passed in 1886. This Income Tax Act was replaced by Income Tax Act, 1918, which was further replaced by Income Tax Act 19
Taxation and Representation?
Price: Free! Words: 3,070. Language: American English. Published: September 28, 2015. Categories: Essay » Political, Essay » Legal
What if a simple change would allow the individual taxpayer to influence the US government at the highest level while blunting the influence of the wealthy, the political action committees, and multinational corporations? What if the system has been in place and working for decades?