Books tagged: unfeeling doctor

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Found 3 results

Broken Bones: New True Noir Essays From the Emergency Room by the Most Unfeeling Doctor in the World
Price: $3.99 USD. Words: 21,530. Language: English. Published: August 18, 2014 by Olo Books. Categories: Nonfiction » Biography » Physicians & medical professionals, Nonfiction » Entertainment » Humor and satire
New, blistering, darkly funny essays breaking bones. And fixing them. And the seamy underside of life in the emergency room, with its cornucopia of crazy cases, not just bone-centred ones. For example, the man who tried to eat his own thumb and the case of bleeding brains. Warning: 1. Broken Bones bears no authorized resemblance to any TV show. Rated R. Medical noir. With cussing. Don’t read it.
The Unfeeling Thousandaire: How I Made $10,000 Indie Publishing and You Can, Too!
Price: $2.99 USD. Words: 9,880. Language: English. Published: September 26, 2012 by Olo Books. Categories: Nonfiction » Publishing » Self-publishing, Nonfiction » Entertainment » Humor and satire
In my first few months of indie publishing, I made zero dollars. That's right. The big donut. But by the end of my first year, I'd grossed over $10,000, making me not a millionaire, but a thousandaire. How? Hard work and a bit of good luck. We can all profit from indie publishing, whether it's a little or a lot. Come join the thousandaires club!
Buddhish: Exploring Buddhism in a Time of Grief: One Doctor's Story
Price: $5.99 USD. Words: 41,640. Language: English. Published: December 9, 2011 by Olo Books. Categories: Nonfiction » Biography » Autobiographies & Memoirs, Nonfiction » Self-improvement » Death, Grief, Bereavement
When you can’t eat, pray, or love. Dr. Melissa Yuan-Innes lost her heart when her first pregnancy ended in stillbirth. Join her on a fresh journey inward, where even a teaspoon of Buddhism—becoming “Buddhish”—helps her, and all of us, wade through grief and slowly rekindle joy."I am a better person and a better Buddhist (whatever that label means) for having read this book."—Barry W. Morris