Monday and the Murdered Man

Adult
Rated 4.00/5 based on 1 reviews
In a sprawling urban landscape where magic is as common as technology, Zack Monday is a hard-working private detective, street-smart, resourceful, and clever. When a dead man walks into Zack's office to solve the mystery of his own murder, Zack must confront thugs, corrupt cops, ghosts, undead mobsters, angels, devils and his ex-wife to find the truths that someone powerful doesn't want found. More

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Words: 93,770
Language: English
ISBN: 9780984768202
About Andrew Kirschbaum

Andrew Kirschbaum was born in Nebraska in 1967. Education, employment, and an overseas war kept the Kirschbaum family on the move for the next ten years, living in Nebraska, Iowa, Nevada, and Florida before settling in Massachusetts. A basic ineptitude at anything not related to reading and writing his native language led to a B.A. in English Literature from Brandeis University and a short-lived career as a technical writer. In 1991, he started 3 Trolls Games & Puzzles – a traditional board game and puzzle store in Chelmsford, MA – with his family and has been running it ever since. In 2011 he collaborated with a group of friends and family to produce Verdigris, an interactive novel for the iPhone and iPad; Monday and the Murdered Man followed shortly thereafter. He is currently working on the next Monday adventure, Monday and the Apocalypse Engine, another interactive novel, and various live action role playing games.

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Reviews

Review by: wendy oconnell on Dec. 21, 2011 :
This book made me laugh. The premise is quirky and intriguing. However, it’s not unusual for a ghost to want revenge for his own murder. Shakespeare started that a long time ago with Hamlet’s ghost. But to borrow it, throw in an urban landscape, with a detective much like Phillip Marlowe from the 1930s, well that’s just rich, thug making creativity through a new kind of magnifying glass. Sweet.
Other than Zach Monday, the hero of the story, the rest of the cast left a vivid impression on your mind. They reminded me of the cast from “Who Framed Roger Rabbit?” Let me explain further by using a line from the book and not spoiling anything for you.
“She rewarded me with a laugh, but she didn’t loosen up one notch. I was hoping to put her at ease and relax her. She held the smile, but her eyes were sharp on me and her body language said ‘control, control, control,’ I guess Charming Zack isn’t so charming as far as Alexandra Sycorax is concerned.”
Again, very funny book, it continued to make me chuckle with its colorful cast and strange premise, but about sixty percent of the way through it there was a bump. I won’t go into details, but it had something to do with death. It felt very confusing for the next several chapters; therefore, unnecessary. There seemed to be a number of ways Andy Kirschbaum, the writer, could have reached his very clever plot end without being confusing for so long.
(reviewed long after purchase)

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