The Crows: A Campfire Tale

Rated 3.50/5 based on 4 reviews
In the middle of the forest, a man shoots down a crow as it flies by, for no other reason than to simply see it die. As he makes his way back to his hunting cabin, he finds himself watched by other crows. Ones who are not so easily frightened off by his loud noises and threats. Now, trapped in his cabin, he begins to fear what the true purpose is behind the presence of the crows. More
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About G.P. Burdon

G.P. Burdon predominantly writes dark thrillers, taking his inspiration from authors such as Edgar Allan Poe and Stephen King, but has his own delightfully twisted style. Anything can happen in his stories and he revels in shocking his readers, as he aims to provide original tales that readers will love and will haunt them long after finishing the final page.

Burdon currently lives in Melbourne, Australia, and has completed his first novel (Kings & Pawns) in 2013, which is available through Amazon and Kindle. Burdon has also recently begun work on a fantasy trilogy entitled Reaper.

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Reviews

Review by: Taron White on Aug. 28, 2013 :
I'll definitely tell that at my next camping trip.
(review of free book)

Review by: Taron White on Aug. 28, 2013 :
I'll definitely tell that at my next camping trip.
(review of free book)

Review by: Matthew Sawyer on Jan. 08, 2012 :
The author has a promising story - it begins with a old man outside shooting crows for recreation. The author implies the murderous pastime is a result of being fired from a job. The reader doesn't learn much about the man, or even his name, but "The Crows" is a short story and is written to feel in-the-moment - telling more might interrupt the sprint. Unfortunately, the ending is predictable and the story itself quickly moves lockstep into shopworn rhythm. Still, it's an enjoyable and fast read. I'd recommend the tale and tell it at a campfire.

Although, I'd polish the tale and fix the instances of overlooked, novice-like flaws - none of which really disturbs the story but the tale has potential to become poetic prose - probably not great, but stronger. I'm talking about examples such as "he heard a sharp squawk and a blur of shadow." I just can't imagine what a blur of shadow sounds like - blur is a visual word, so the author can step in and make suggestions. Also, there is a little confusion with verb use - ie. swoop, swooping, swooped. This story can generate more dynamic images if the author drops the "-ing." Then again, that's me being picky and my own writing has plenty of room for improvement. I must reiterate, "The Crows" is an enjoyable story, even if it does sound familiar.
(review of free book)

Review by: Mark Lambert on Jan. 08, 2012 :
Well written, but very much reminds of "The Birds" certianly how they gather, and how they come in the chimney and attack.
(review of free book)

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