Heaven 2.0

1 star1 star1 star0.25 star
In the future, the technology exists to allow every human being who has ever lived to be rescued at the time of their deaths. Unfortunately, the fate of the departed is left in the hands of a money-hungry corporation. More

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Published: Feb. 16, 2012
Words: 61,860
Language: English
ISBN: 9781465933904
About Scott Haworth

Scott was born in the wagon of a traveling show. His Momma used to dance for the money they'd throw. Pappa would do whatever he could... Well, not really. That would have been a lot more interesting though. He was actually born in the suburbs of Cleveland.

After existing for several more decades, Scott graduated from college in 2004 with a degree in history and political science. Six months later he decided he wanted to be a writer, which made the degree largely worthless. Oops.

Scott has written many novels in genres ranging from science fiction to political satire. He tried combining the two genres once, but he didn't think anyone would be interested in a sex scandal involving the President of Blargon 7.

When not writing, he enjoys being asleep.

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Reviews

Review by: Angela Baxter on Sep. 22, 2012 : star star star
I don't usually read much sci-fi so this was an unusual book choice for me. However, I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed the story. It was an unusual subject matter but I found it interesting and different. The story had me gripped until about 80 per cent of the way through when I found it rather far-fetched (yes, even for a sci-fi story!) and it did feel that it was rushing to a conclusion. However, it did finish satisfactorily and I won't hestitate to recommend this book.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Angela Baxter on Sep. 22, 2012 : (no rating)
I don't usually read much sci-fi so this was an unusual book choice for me. However, I was pleasantly surprised by how much I enjoyed the story. It was an unusual subject matter but I found it interesting and different. The story had me gripped until about 80 per cent of the way through when I found it rather far-fetched (yes, even for a sci-fi story!) and it did feel that it was rushing to a conclusion. However, it did finish satisfactorily and I won't hestitate to recommend this book.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Amanda Capper on Sep. 19, 2012 : (no rating)
Chairman Robertson called a meeting concerning an incident that happened “on the fourteenth of July in the year of our Almighty God 2769”. Michael Kepler, a first year extractor, and his mentor, Gabrielle Hawking, are both at the meeting. In fact, they are the reason for the meeting because of a bit of bother with The Computer. Seems they almost extracted someone before their time.

Scott Haworth has created a very interesting concept for his readers; the notion that God intended humans to use the intelligence He gave them, to create their own Heaven and Hell. Using extremely advanced medical procedures, no one ever dies, though those consigned to Hell desperately want to. Intelligent though they may be, humans are still subject to corruption, as Mike discovers when a person he knows to be decent and good is sent to Hell. Mike, like any good hero, cannot let this happen and takes on those who make the decisions.

Heaven 2.0 is a good read and well worth at least thrice the price. There is one niggle pertaining to the writing that needs to be addressed (sometimes the adverbs got out of hand), but it wasn’t enough to take me out of the story. Thought-provoking, and with a hint of romance, I recommend it and would welcome comments.

Reviewed by Amanda J. Capper for TheGenReview www.thegenreview.com
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: Roger Lawrence on Sep. 04, 2012 : star star star star
This is a beautifully written book, and just as important for one self publish novel, very well edited. It is an engaging and unique plot which I enjoyed throughout. Ultimately, the test of a new book and writer is: Would I read it again? Well I would, and recommend it to anyone.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

Review by: GeekyGirlReview on Sep. 01, 2012 : star star star
This is a good book but it wasn't one that got me hooked into the story. It took me a few days to read.The storyline was good, very well written and a little different from what I would usually read but it was good. If you like this kind of books you might like it.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Ron C. Nieto on July 13, 2012 : star star star
This is one of those books that are hard to review. It falls mostly outside of my usual genre choices, but when I got the review request, I just couldn’t resist the concept. I’m glad I read it, and yet there are things that keep me from gushing about it.

Plot and characters are fairly straightforward, for example. It’s not simplistic, just simple. The story cuts to the chase and leaves out anything that doesn’t propel the plot, which means character development scenes are nonexistent, meaningful relationships are scarce, and the action itself sometimes reads too convenient. I can deal with the character issues, because this kind of story is more about mankind than about any particular person and the author got me invested successfully in the general plight—namely, destroying that crappy 28th century society and doing so by yesterday if at all possible. I truly disliked them with this uneasy feeling in your gut that you reserve for really abhorrent people. In that respect, kudos to Heaven 2.0... because not only it was dreadful, it was also entirely possible.

The plot part was a bit harder to swallow. I think a good comparison for this book, in the movie world, would be the Isle (you know, with Ewan McGregor?). It’s that kind of desperate fight against impossible odds, of individuals against the system, of claustrophobia... except that everything was so matter-of-fact, so quick, so straight, that there was no tension. Even when the real action takes place, I had no expectations about the results because it was too farfetched to work. And later, things just fell into place: after all, if you don’t know anything about a huge compound called Hell and you just venture in, how likely are you to actually find the two people you’re looking for in the first try?

Another aspect that nagged me a little was the science side of things. The level of tech here is mind-numbing; it needs to be in order for Heaven to exist. In general, breezing through all that as if it was normal, as if it was magic, shouldn’t be a problem, but some sci-fi fans like to have an attempt at explanation behind all the evolution. I liked some details, like pen and paper no longer existing, handwriting being considered a Dark Ages activity, or people crammed up in Mars. Even space-time travel, I could handle. The refrigerators, which are actually matter generators and voice-operated, confused me a bit more, which I understand is ridiculous after you’ve gone an accepted the engineering of Heaven.

Perhaps I had trouble transitioning to the future because I had only a very sketchy idea about how we got there. Or perhaps I would just have been happy if you’d thrown in some buttons with the frigs... In any case, a warning here because there’s a lot of progress to take in.

Should you read Heaven 2.0? Well, I certainly enjoyed the read. I liked the concept, and I always like to read about human nature. That said, though, I think this novel could have used a few more pages (that’s weird... usually I complain about the opposite!) in order to allow for more detailed characters to make the reader’s investment more personal and in order to muddy up the convenient line of events to create more tension. It’s really short as it is, though, so if you have a chance to check it out you should probably see how you feel about it.
(reviewed long after purchase)

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