We, The Watched

Rated 4.00/5 based on 5 reviews
An amnesiac calling himself Seven enters a dystopian surveillance society where the government keeps a Watched list of its own citizens and the Church has become as powerful as the state. Seven's blank-slate perspective helps him see through the propaganda, and he soon gets involved with a group of rebels called the Underground. More

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About Adam Bender

Adam Bender is an award-winning journalist and author of speculative fiction that explores modern-day societal fears with a mix of action and romance.

Adam's latest novel is The Wanderer and the New West, a dystopian western about lawlessness in near-future America. He's also the author of two dystopian sci-fi novels about government surveillance: We, The Watched and Divided We Fall. Adam adapted his first novel into a screenplay and has written several short stories.

In his day job as a journalist, Adam has covered politics and technology for Communications Daily and Computerworld Australia. He has won multiple investigative reporting awards from the Society of Professional Journalists and the Specialized Information Publishers Association for his telecom and internet news coverage.

Despite how this all might appear, Adam is generally a rather modest and amiable fellow. He lives in Philadelphia with his wife Mallika, and he'd be happy to have a craft beer with you at the next Phillies game.

Learn more about Adam at WatchAdam.blog and @WatchAdam on Twitter!

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Reviews

Review by: Phoebe Goh on July 25, 2012 :
A dystopian future society run by a religion with an iron fist. A likeable protagonist with no memory exploring the world with the reader.

I really enjoyed the way this story was written, it was engaging and entertaining but not lighthearted. The environments and atmosphere was created well, although sometimes the plot felt a little staged.

The ending felt a little rushed, but overall it was a great read. I'd recommend it to anyone who enjoys stories like Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep (or Blade Runner) or the Hunger Games.
(reviewed 22 days after purchase)

Review by: Phillip Benages on Nov. 01, 2011 :
We the Watched is an intriguing thought experiment into the application of an extremist approach to domestic monitoring of citizens on a modern day era. Though no specific country names or religions are mentioned, it is very simple to draw the connection between already existing situations such as The Patriot Act, and religious law in the Middle East.

The narrative begins with a somewhat jarring entry into the mind of the protagonist, an amnesic mind, desperate for answers, every bit as confused and erratic as one might expect. With every deduction and distraction, the reader is pulled into the mind themselves. It is somewhat of a brute force tactic, but in the end it results in a deep connection with the character drawing extremely visceral responses from the reader to the events that unfold as the story progresses.

Bender does a good job of lyrically painting the landscape. Even when the environments themselves are supposed to be somewhat industrial and plain, the reader is able to visualize vivid mental pictures, complete with imagery of the citizens of this dystopian society and tinges of the white noise that are indicative of the dark secrets it hides.

Ultimately, We the Watched is definitely worth the read. There is room for expansion and elaboration of the world, but doing so would have been wholly unnecessary for the narrative portrayed. It is a fantastic debut for Bender, and I look forward to seeing what else he comes up with.
(reviewed 20 days after purchase)

Review by: Phillip Benages on Nov. 01, 2011 :
We the Watched is an intriguing thought experiment into the application of an extremist approach to domestic monitoring of citizens on a modern day era. Though no specific country names or religions are mentioned, it is very simple to draw the connection between already existing situations such as The Patriot Act, and religious law in the Middle East.

The narrative begins with a somewhat jarring entry into the mind of the protagonist, an amnesic mind, desperate for answers, every bit as confused and erratic as one might expect. With every deduction and distraction, the reader is pulled into the mind themselves. It is somewhat of a brute force tactic, but in the end it results in a deep connection with the character drawing extremely visceral responses from the reader to the events that unfold as the story progresses.

Bender does a good job of lyrically painting the landscape. Even when the environments themselves are supposed to be somewhat industrial and plain, the reader is able to visualize vivid mental pictures, complete with imagery of the citizens of this dystopian society and tinges of the white noise that are indicative of the dark secrets it hides.

Ultimately, We the Watched is definitely worth the read. There is room for expansion and elaboration of the world, but doing so would have been wholly unnecessary for the narrative portrayed. It is a fantastic debut for Bender, and I look forward to seeing what else he comes up with.
(reviewed 20 days after purchase)

Review by: JJ Williams on Aug. 25, 2011 :
Enjoyed this story of a dystopian future. Well written, felt the story ended well but that the writing tapered off a bit as if teh author was having difficulty.
(reviewed 2 years after purchase)

Review by: Marjorie Mindel on Jan. 22, 2011 :
A very thoughtful, frightening look at a possible future if "Big Brother" becomes a reality. I was expected a depressing rehash of past published works but was pleasantly surprised by We, The Watched. Kudos.
(reviewed 23 days after purchase)

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