I Talk Slower Than I Think: An Antidote to Helicopter Parenting

Rated 5.00/5 based on 1 reviews
These 52 Creative Nonfiction stories capture some of the amusing tales and a few tragic moments we had growing up. Most of the stories will make funnybones ache, but a few will make heartstrings feel like fresh sutures. Few people have tasted a biscuit that was so hard firemen had to remove it, dodged bobcats on their way to the bathroom, or waded through a treasure of Confederate money. More

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About C. D. Bonner

C. D. Bonner was born and raised in rural Georgia but can claim naturalized citizenship in Tallapoosa County, Alabama and Virginia Beach, Virginia as a retired Coast Guard veteran. C. D. Bonner left the tarpaper shacks of Appalachia for a long military career, rising through the enlisted and officer ranks. He was a skilled Morse telegrapher and a calming voice during many search and rescue cases. He left a town of 300 souls to travel the world, living in Boston, New Orleans, DC, and even on the island of Guam for a couple of years.
C. D. is a skilled Studebaker car mechanic, tube radio repairman and a weekend gold prospector. He is a professional narrator. His upcoming projects include recording two albumns of his original comedy and writing a new compilation of short stories.
His partner PJ, a multi-talented artist, shares these same interests. Together, they travel and spend time at homes in Alabama and Virginia.

Videos

I Talk Slower Than I Think: An Antidote to Helicopter Parenting
An introductory video to the book, "I Talk Slower Than I Think."

Reviews

Review by: Janet Percy on March 10, 2014 :
I Talk Slower Than I Think: An Antidote to Helicopter Parenting (Kindle Edition)

This book is chocked full of adventurous times from the 60’s and 70’s of a southern family. He describes them as poor and by material standards, they probably were. I describe them as rich. They had respect for each other and were able to learn so much that doesn’t have a monetary value. How to prepare Cat Head biscuits, how to collect worms and store them until you go fishing. I’m not sure my Mother would have laughed in that situation, as his Mother did. I had many belly laughs as I read his adventures. Some of which were very dangerous and nearly caused death. I didn’t know you could lose your eyebrows by diving into a quarry from a great height. How to dig a well. My husband related to that story as he helped dig wells by shovel at the age of 13 and 14. I learned not to go fishing beside a creek when the water moccasins were coming out of hibernation and mating. That gave me chills. I’ve heard of many of these adventures of youth from my husband and friends. We were reared in much the same way. We were allowed to explore the country side and suffer the consequences of our actions. I highlighted a passage from his book, “I guess we all lose innocence a bit at a time. It just seems that we had a lot more of it to lose growing up back then.” The generation of today is missing so much but the times prevent them from having the freedom we had. This is a wonderful, nostalgic book to read. I highly recommend it.
(reviewed within a month of purchase)

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