Hunger

Rated 4.50/5 based on 2 reviews
Hunger is an anthology of short science fiction and fantasy stories. Each of them relates to the hungers that drive humanity--for food, for love, for power, for release from drudgery, or escape from times that have become too interesting. The stories in Hunger speak to the deep drives that move you, the appetites that lurk beneath the surface, struggling to emerge into the light.

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About S. A. Barton

S.A. Barton lives in coastal Virginia with his wife, teen stepson, two under-5s, and demanding cat (as they all are). His path to the present was a strange, sometimes harrowing, and winding one; you may find this reflected in his writing.

He has appeared in the pages of Penumbra magazine, in Daily Science Fiction, and in OMNI Reboot. He is also proud to be a self-published indie author with dozens of short ebooks and collections to his credit, which may be found through sabarton.com, and tweets far too much as @Tao23.

While most of S.A. Barton's work is in science fiction, some of it strays into other genres such as fantasy, mainstream, alternate history and others -- like the cat, it wanders some.

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Reviews

Review by: C.R. Rice on Sep. 13, 2013 :
Hunger is fantastic. Way too short for me, but an excellent read. I realize that this is Barton’s preferred medium (he’s likes writing short stories and he’s good at it), but some of these narratives felt like dipping my toe in the ocean. I know there could be more, but I’ll never find out because the tide went out. All were equally good, but the first one, the Mask of Sisyphus left marks on me. It’s about a man who works at a fast food joint in the future whose boss makes him an offer he can’t refuse. I don’t know whether to call it fiction or a critique on modern society’s minimum wage slaves. Each paragraph is bursting with the author’s thoughts on the subject, but cleverly masked to read like fiction. I don’t want to give too much away, but suffice it to say that the protagonist does what his boss wants, and things go topsy-turvy from there. I do have a small issue though: his style reads like a stream of consciousness making the narrative a little less tight than it could be. I found myself rereading several paragraphs over to try to get what he was telling me. Overall, the entire book is excellent and I highly recommend it. Barton’s writing reminds me of Philip K. Dick and I can see his work being optioned into Hollywood movies years down the line. It’s really that good.

I'd give Hunger 5 stars because the story is excellent, but is overridden by the writing style at times and jolts me out of the flow.
(reviewed long after purchase)

Review by: Nick Angelis on July 20, 2013 :
First of all, I do feel hungry after reading these unusual stories. Some of them have common themes while others employ subjects and plot elements I would have never thought of. Either way, never anger a chicken or verbally assault tropical fruit.
(reviewed the day of purchase)

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