Lady of The Sidhe

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A lone Elven woman, Imerra Silverhair, searches for her son, picking up unexpected allies along the way in the ancient might-have-been world of Telamon. Along the way she discovers an ancient menace that had been fought before long ago and seemingly defeated. A part of the Ages of Telamon series. More

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About Shana O'Quinn

Sandoz was born Shana O'Quinn and grew up in the Appalachias in the middle of absolute nowhere. Consequently, she likes to think of herself as everyone's favorite internet redneck.

She loves fantasy, horror, movies with explosions, hobbits, and/or pirates in it. If you know of a hobbit pirate zombie ninja movie with lots of shit blowing up, do let us know.

Sandoz loves to write stuff that entertains her. Hopefully it entertains others as well. She's currently finishing up a BA in Graphic Multimedia and Design. Cause she likes to draw shtuff.

Also in Ages of Telamon

Also by This Author

Reviews

Review by: Christopher Courtley on April 07, 2013 : star star star star star
This book brought back fond memories of playing Dungeons & Dragons and reading the Forgotten Realms fiction of R.A. Salvatore. Shana O'Quinn is a wonderful new author with a vivid imagination and the skill to bring her musings forth in vibrant colour upon the page, not only in her illustrations (the cover art is her own) but in her words as well. "Lady of the Sidhe" will take you back to a time and place that never existed, but perhaps should have; yet it never ceases to remain relevant to our current lives and times. A highly entertaining read that left me hungry for more.

Christopher Courtley, Author & Poet
www.christophercourtley.com
www.courtleymanor.blogspot.com
https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/christophercourtley
(reviewed the day of purchase)

Review by: David H. Keith on Jan. 27, 2013 : star star star star star
Ms. O'Quinn/Driftwood has that refreshing ability to weave a memorable story from myth and, possibly, poetic license, not unlike the bards of old. I was captured by the title - being of Scot's descent and a follower of the Old Religion, to boot - and became even more entangled as the story progressed. Granted, some of her creatures are not of ancient times and myth but Tolkien's, but that in no way detracts from her tale. After all, *someone* has to be the bad guy, right? Might as well be Tolkien's quintessential bearers of evil, the Orcs.

I did have one complaint, however, that bears mentioning. That is that, like so many beginning writers, Ms. O'Quinn/Driftwood fails to pay sufficient attention to the minutiae of story-telling: spelling, grammar, and even punctuation. In her case, that was merely a nuisance for she more than compensated with a compelling yarn full of sword- (and axe-) play, derring do, beautiful damsels, dashing men, and the requisite spice of romance.

Would I recommend this book? In a hummingbird's heartbeat.

David H. Keith
www.davidkeith1.blogspot.com
www.novemberfirstpublications.weebly.com
(review of free book)

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